DIY plug vs. prof patch

Status
Not open for further replies.
I also keep a small compressor and plug kit in each vehicle..and have used them plenty of times with no failures. Sidewall problems are beyond any help regardless but I have fixed tread punctures many times that lasted the life of the tire. I have been told by a couple of shops that they can only legally fix a couple (2-3 I can't remember) holes in a tire. I'm sure there is a certain failure rate with the repairs but so far mine have worked well.
 
Just a couple of points: To my knowledge, there aren't any laws in the US about repairing tires. What most shops that repair tires are concerned about is the legal liability of repairing tires differently than what the RMA recommends. They are also concerned about the effect repeated underinflation (due to the punctures) might have on the durability of the tire they are repairing, and how that might affect THEIR legal liability. Many folks close to the problem think that one repair per tire is the sensible limit. Let face it. Any time a tire has been operated underinflated, some of its durability has been lost. How much? Depends on how long and how underinflated the tire was. Plus having the puncture provides an avenue for pressurized air to enter the casing, something that doesn't happen otherwise. Not to mention outside contaminants, like water, in contact with the steel belts. This is why plugs are specifically called out as unacceptable by the RMA. One of the things I think gets lost in these discussions is failure rates. Using the Firestone situation as a reference point, you'd have to have 1 tire fail out of 300 repairs to get the same failure rate - meaning the average Joe isn't going to experience this. Hope this helps.
 
that rma repair guide just SCREAMS buracracy! man they have like way to many steps to repair a tyre. you look on the back of a swizzle stick tyre plug kit, and at the most there is 12 words and maybe 2 illustrations. 6 of the words are probably in spanish. the rma even warns about tyre celemt exploding and causing death! this is a classic example of industry. they want to sell more rubber so they try to discourage tyre patching.
 
on the worst set of tires i have ever owned i had at least 4 plugs in each tire (4x4 tires, any stick i ran over would puncture them). I never had an issue with any of them leaking or coming out, when i did finally get a flat on the freeway it was due to a "bruised" sidewall. those tires were firestone firehawk atx's, later known as firestone wilderness atx, aka flip your explorer over firestones. they were junk but i did get 45,000 miles out of them!.
 
I post above, I go on a trip and got a screw in my new motorcycle tire. [Duh!] I plugged it, aired up and went on my way. Looks like I'm going to be op-testing a plug for a little while. At least this one is between the tread blocks. Did some dirt riding and still no problem. I'm going to use it up until I go on my big 10k mile ride in August, then I'll get new rubber before the trip. My bike that I mentioned above had it right in the middle of the tire, and Dunlop 208s don't have tread blocks.
 
Another vote for tire plugs! I've been using them for years and never had one leak or come out. It's common in rock crawling to tear a sidewall and usually you can get back to camp if you have enough plugs to patch the hole. In my younger days I did many a burn out with a plug in a tire and they never came out. Currantly I have 41 plugs between 4 tires on my ATV! The tires don't lose any air between rides which may be a month or more sometimes. Plugs are the only way to go on ATV tires because breaking them down is a major ordeal and the tires flex too much for a patch........Patches won't stick very long in these conditions. Pep boys sells the good "Camel" brand plugs and 4-West off road sells the good tire plug tools. [Cheers!]
 
quote:
Originally posted by moribundman:
quote:
I was really skeptical of those twisted rubber cord "swizzle stick" plugs when I first used them but after patching many tires with them I've never had one fail.
Exactly, I've never had one come out or leak. But don't get me wrong, I trust them only to a point, which is street-legal speeds. What really bugs me is that I always get a punctured tire right after buying new tires. If I see construction site near my house, I go the other way and around the site. I saw a slow motion video showing how a tire picks up nail or screw. It's pretty amazing to watch!

Have a link?
 
quote:
Originally posted by robbobster: If the hole is within reason, Michelin does not downgrade the speed rating of their high-performance tires if they have a proper plug/repair. I think that's really saying something.
Yeah but then the day before a very important trip they will refuse to certify the tire for the activity for which it was specificaly designed, causing you and your fellow Michelin owners to boycott the event.
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lumberg: Yeah but then the day before a very important trip they will refuse to certify the tire for the activity for which it was specificaly designed, causing you and your fellow Michelin owners to boycott the event.
[LOL!] Classic!
 
I thought a thorough fix would involve not only a plug and patch (possibly a combo "mushroom" patch), but the hole should be drilled out with a carbide cutter. The rationale is that the plug will fit snugly in a round hole drilled out to its specific diameter, and the cutter smooths off any damaged steel tread pieces. Complete repair kits include multiple plug (or plug/patch) and carbide cutter sizes. Rema says that their plugs ("Rema Stems") are meant for a "two piece" repair with a patch. http://www.rematiptop.com/Rema%20Site%20New/Passenger%20and%20Light%20Truck%20Tire%20Nail%20Hole%20Repair%20Catalog.htm
 
quote:
Originally posted by moribundman: A deaf driver would have kept going merrily, smoking, catching fire, burning...
Where is it legal to drive when you cannot hear? It's a prerequisite to hear and have 20/40 vision in order to drive.
 
My 2 quarts I have used the tire patch kits three different times with no problems. I would do it again if I needed a patch again. I don't see them simply "falling out" they are cemented into the rubber and they wear down as the tire does. I would only do it if it wasn't on the sidewall or on the strips to the sides of the outside tread lines. The only major problems that I have come across myself has been when tires have lost their balance. The last time it happened I had a chunk of tar from road construction stick to the tire and it was right before jumping on the 70mph highway, needless to say I coldn't keep up with the traffic, so I pulled off as quickly as I could switch to my spare and cleaned the 1/2" thick hardened tar mess off at home.
 
Ususlly to install a plug you have to ream the hole out larger to get the plug to fit. This does additional damage to the belts, particularly on a steel belt tire. I'd take it to the tire store for a patch, especially since you have the warranty.
 
quote:
Originally posted by ebaker: Ususlly to install a plug you have to ream the hole out larger to get the plug to fit. This does additional damage to the belts, particularly on a steel belt tire. I'd take it to the tire store for a patch, especially since you have the warranty.
Kind of defeats the purpose of a do it yourself kit. [Smile] I brought up the subject of carbide cutters, which as you indicate "ream" out the hole to get a proper plug to fit. Much literature on tire repair says that this step must be done because sharp damaged steel tread fragments can damage a plug. http://www.chemco.ca/Products/Tire_Repair/Goodyear/gdy_carbide_cut.htm
quote:
Carbide cutters are required to prepare injuries for radial tires and follow Goodyear tire repair procedures. When used as directed, injuries can be repaired to meet industry and Goodyear requirements. These carbide cutters remove damaged steel cable from the injury, allowing the insertion of a plug into the injury. Failure to properly prepare the injury with a carbide cutter will leave sharp steel cables in the injury that will damage (tear) the plug as it is inserted. Always use a low speed drill for cutting out the injured area.
Certainly there have been people who have used the DIY repair kits without any apparent problems. However - it's your choice as to whether or not to risk the safety of yourself and your family in order to save $25.
 
quote:
Originally posted by kenw: fyi, modern plugs are much better than the old ones, they have a "cap" that seals the inside much like a patch. It is still inserted from the outside, the head (or patch part) is rolled to fit thru the hole and expands once inside.
Just had a tire plugged Thurs. I wanted the inside patch done. I questioned using a plug over the inside patch and was told the plugs today are fine. No thumping or other problems after some time like the old style plugs. Went with the new plug. Don't know how good or bad it will be as the tire is now the full size spare.
 
I've put in probably a hundred Camel plugs in tires over the years.. the worst that has ever happened was a slow leak developing very near the end of the tire's service life. most of the plugs I've used have gone into Bobcat tires. A skidsteer is about the most demanding applicaton for a tire I can think of. When we're doing concrete demo work w/ the hydrohammer.. it's not uncommon to get 6 or 8 flats a day when removing WWM reinforced concrete. when we returned the last machine.. the tires must have had 20 plugs in each tire w/ no failures of the plugs themselves. of course if the machine wasn't a rental, it'd be running foam filled tires, but that's another story.
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bret Chase: .....the worst that has ever happened was a slow leak developing very near the end of the tire's service life.....A skidsteer is about the most demanding applicaton for a tire I can think of.....
On a Skid Steer tires a leak is generally the worst thing that CAN happen to a repair. It may seem counter intuitive, but skid steer tires are not very demanding when it comes to internal stresses. Sure, skid steer tires are subjected to horrible road hazard conditions, but any tire subjected to high speeds will have far greater internal stresses. This is due to the standing waves that form immediately after the footprint. (watch the tires the next time you watch drag racing.) It's these internal stresses that cause problems with repairs made to street tires. Not to mention that hardly anybody inspects the tire about to be repaired for evidence of excessive underinflation. Let's face it - we know underinflated tires can fail. And a repaired tire was operated underinflated, the only questions are how much and for how long. Hope this helps.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top