Cleaning the MAF sensor

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4,477
Location
Kuwait
Unfortunately, CRC's MAF Cleaner is not a product that's available in my neck of the woods. Nearly every other CRC product is widely available, but this particular one isn't. I used to clean my MAF with CRC's QD Electronic Cleaner, but that's a different product judging by its spec sheet. Its propellant is HFC-152a (as opposed to carbon dioxide with the MAF Cleaner), and the evaporation rate is not mentioned other than "fast" (9 with MAF Cleaner). Information is available here: CRC QD Electronic Cleaner CRC MAF Cleaner I've had to replace my MAF today, because I was experiencing poor idle and a lot of bucking at highway speeds, and now I'm quite paranoid about what I should use as a cleaner. I'm not sure if the use of QD Electronic Cleaner has anything to do with my failed MAF, but a year ago I was told my MAP sensor was knackered (which is actually a program utilising the MAF for data) through a DPC code. I'm not sure if the cleaning had anything to do with it, but after cleaning it would always idle and run much smoother. Anyway, based on some reading I've done, I came across another product: CRC Marine QD Electronic Cleaner Looking at the spec sheet, the evaporation rate is the same as the MAF Cleaner, but again the propellant is HFC-152a. Having said that, the dealership uses tape head cleaner to clean the MAF sensor. I was wondering what would be a suitable alternative to the said MAF Cleaner for this application. Should I continue using QD EC, or would it be worthwhile looking into other products? I'm just wondering if I should look for something specific on spec sheets, and maybe a few product recommendations which I may be able to find around here. Thanks!
 
Messages
740
Location
md
MAF should not need cleaning with proper air filtration ahead of it- keep your air filters changed at regular intervals and MAF stays clean- I went 200,000 miles on my Q45 without ever cleaning the MAF.
 

Falcon_LS

Thread starter
Messages
4,477
Location
Kuwait
I change my OE filter every 3,000 miles. But with the amount of dust around here, I'm afraid MAF cleaning is necessary. \:\(
 
Messages
8,439
Location
Texas
 Originally Posted By: sciphi
I've used the QD Electronics Cleaner. Everything is running great so far...
Same here, tried it once when I had no MAF cleaner. No problems.
 
Messages
964
Location
San Antonio, Texas
You can use any non residue electronic parts cleaner on the MAF. I usually end up getting a can from Altex, Radio Shack, and some Office Depot or Office Max stores carry the cleaner also. Just spray it down real well and let it dry.
 
Messages
1,183
Location
Canada
You can use CRC QD electronics cleaner without ANY worry. It is almost the exact same product as the MAF product. The important part is that CRC QD (like the MAF cleaner) is SAFE for plastics, and has NO residue that can be left behind. QD does as good a job cleaning the sensor as MAF cleaner and will clean safer and BETTER than the alcohol will.
 
Messages
19,479
Location
Chicago Area
Rubbing alcohol has water in it. Of course it may help clean a MAF, but I would't use it as a first choice. Electronic parts cleaners often say "leaves no residue", yet say it leaves a protective coating at the same time! Obviously there is a film that you don't want left on the MAF. Naptha [lighter fluid], leaves no residue and is a very good cleaner. No spray is available, though.
 
Messages
5,980
Location
Texas Hill Country
Electrical contact cleaner is what I used. The maf sensor in some of my fords was as black as tar, and it was affecting drive ability. Ford would have replaced the sensor for $200, I cleaned it for the cost of some contact cleaner.
 
Messages
4,872
Location
MN
I use MAF sensor cleaner as well, but have used electrical contact cleaner in the past. I usually clean the MAF and intake at the same time. CRC makes intake cleaner that dissolves the carbon build up in most intakes.
 
Messages
10,738
Location
Nokesville, VA
I realize that this is an old post, but I think the reason that CRC does not use HFC-152a as a propellant in the MAF cleaner is this (from Wikipedia):
Quote:
Flammability and burn-products Difluoroethane is flammable, and will produce both hydrogen fluoride and carbon monoxide if burned. Hydrogen fluoride, in contact with moisture, will create hydrofluoric acid, which is extremely dangerous to humans. Carbon monoxide, upon inhalation, will act as a persistent asphyxiant.
Not an issue unless someone sprays it into a running engine...
 
Messages
1,923
Location
Cincinnati, USA
Originally Posted by qship1996
MAF should not need cleaning with proper air filtration ahead of it- keep your air filters changed at regular intervals and MAF stays clean- I went 200,000 miles on my Q45 without ever cleaning the MAF.
You have no idea what you're talking about. Any engine, when shut off, will have some gradual accumulation of soot in the intake. Think about it! If this were not true then nobody would ever need to clean their throttle bodies. If soot can make it back to the throttle body, the MAF is in the same path with nothing filtering between the two, and it takes much much less soot to foul the MAF than the throttle body. Sorry to reply to such an old topic but your statement was so extremely false to the point of ludicrous that I felt it needed corrected. You could have a theoretically perfect air filter that never lets in ANYTHING and your MAF will still be contaminated over time by the engine.
 
Messages
1,923
Location
Cincinnati, USA
Originally Posted by mechtech2
Rubbing alcohol has water in it. Of course it may help clean a MAF, but I would't use it as a first choice. Electronic parts cleaners often say "leaves no residue", yet say it leaves a protective coating at the same time!
Mmm, no. I have never seen any parts cleaner that claimed both "leaves no residue" and also "leaves a protective coating". Further, while you can pick a low water content rubbing alcohol, water is not a problem. It's in all the air the engine takes in for hundreds of thousands of miles, and the engine itself produces water as the greatest non-gaseous byproduct of combustion.
 
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