Changing to synthetic

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I Just got a new 2010 Camaro 2LT/RS( V6 w/304 hp) about a month ago and did an oil change at 1000 miles w/dyno and plan to do another change at 2000 then 3000 w/dyno(valvoline 5/30)or should I just wait and change at 3000 w/ dyno . My question is after the dyno fills , when should I switch over to synthetic oil and at what mileage should I do it at and which brand of synthetic should I use ? I had plan to use Mobil 1 since they are factory fill in the Camaro's w/ a V8 .. Thanks to all that reply ..
 
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You already did the most important one at 1000 miles. You can switch to synthetic whenever you want to, use whatever brand you're comfortable with. The brand you mentioned would work well. BTW, it's dino oil, not dyno oil. Dyno around here means dynomometer.
 
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I'd check that that V-6 doesn't need synthetic in it. The Caddy's that use that engine need a 4718M synthetic....
 
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Yeah no kidding about the synth. There's a considerable amount of debate around here as well as to whether the factory fill contains break-in additives that shouldn't be changed prematurely as well. Changing motor oil more often than recommended by the manual recommendations can be a reason for the manufacturer to deny waranty coverage on affected components (intake, O2 instrumentation, catalytic converters, etc.). I personally wouldn't recommend it. Oil filters actually do a pretty good job of doing exactly that -- filtering the oil. That's why they're there, and they'll easily collect any break-in particles that may arise that have the potential for damage.
 

lwrnccst

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 Originally Posted By: hate2work
You already did the most important one at 1000 miles. You can switch to synthetic whenever you want to, use whatever brand you're comfortable with. The brand you mentioned would work well. BTW, it's dino oil, not dyno oil. Dyno around here means dynomometer.
Thanks for pointing that out! ! I meant "dino" not "dyno"
 
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Hey Nick, thanks for the signature line reminder. W. Edward Deming went to GM, Ford, and Chrysler to teach them something new about the automobile business, and they laughed him off. (1940's; 1950's) The Japanese started to listen to his new ideas, and they have an Annual Award, named after Edward Deming, given to the best Automobile Manufacturer in Japan; highly regarded Award, by the way. Edward Deming's Ideas have come back to "Haunt" GM, Ford, and Chrysler. Sorry I am off topic on this thread, just wanted people to know why the Japanese and other foreign car producers are doing better than the "Big Three" mess.
 

pbm

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I belong to a union and I don't fully agree with Deming though he may have had it right in the 1940's and 50's.
 
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 Originally Posted By: pitzel
Changing motor oil more often than recommended by the manual recommendations can be a reason for the manufacturer to deny waranty coverage on affected components (intake, O2 instrumentation, catalytic converters, etc.).
WHAT???? I can guarantee you that no auto mfg will ever deny warranty coverage because you changed the oil too often. The ONLY way it might come into play is if you have a situation where the mfg actually uses a break in oil or additive( some Hondas come to mind ). Changing that early could possibly cause you some grief. Most auto mfg's do not use special break in oils or additives however and if you want to change your oil every 1K it will have no bearing on your warranty. Also, changing your oil often is going to have no effect on instrumentation( I really don't get this one? ), 02 sensors, cat's, etc... The only way 02 sensors and cat's are effected by oil is if you have blow bye. Otherwise oil never touches either. Also not sure juste xactly what you mean by intake issues with changing oil too often either. No clue on that? Man no offense but wow where did you come up with this?
 
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 Originally Posted By: addyguy
I'd check that that V-6 doesn't need synthetic in it. The Caddy's that use that engine need a 4718M synthetic....
I thought the same thing when I read the OP's post. Chevy.com doesn't have online manuals up yet for 2010 models but I would almost bet the Camaro takes GM4718M spec'd oil regardless of which engine. To the OP - you should check your oil fill cap as another member posted to see if it says Mobil 1. Even if it doesn't I would check your manual and make sure that you aren't required to run an oil meeting the GM4718M oil standard. If so be advised it is impossible for a conventional oil to meet this standard. It MUST be a synthetic.
 
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You can switch at anytime to Syn oil. Good ones IMO are Mobil 1, Pennzoil Platinum, Amsoil, Valvoline Syn Power, Redline. The best bargain is probably PP. Buy it by the Jug at Walmart or get oil deals as stated above. Autozone has a good deal on Mobil 1 and a Mobil 1 filter for 29.95.
 
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 Originally Posted By: lwrnccst
I Just got a new 2010 Camaro 2LT/RS( V6 w/304 hp) about a month ago and did an oil change at 1000 miles w/dyno and plan to do another change at 2000 then 3000 w/dyno(valvoline 5/30)or should I just wait and change at 3000 w/ dyno . My question is after the dyno fills , when should I switch over to synthetic oil and at what mileage should I do it at and which brand of synthetic should I use ? I had plan to use Mobil 1 since they are factory fill in the Camaro's w/ a V8 .. Thanks to all that reply ..
lwrnccst, Congratulations on getting your Camaro! I too am a recent buyer of a NEW 08' Impala SS and am currentlystill using the factory fill oil which I found out was Mobil 5000. Currently my plan is just to wait and change my oil when the OLM tells me to do so and then switch to a synthetic from the delaership. Unfortunatly/oddly I just found out the this dealership uses/is exclusive Chevron products. I had thought it's just better for them to use Mobil because I heard they supply big time overall. They have a synthetic version which I've been told that it is a very good product so unless my plans change I'll ask/use the Chevron synthetic. My suggestion to you is to stick to Mobil 1 in the right oil weight until the Camaro is out of warranty and then try what ever synthetic you like. Besides you can't go wrong with M1. Good driving to ya, Durango
 
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 Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
I can guarantee you that no auto mfg will ever deny warranty coverage because you changed the oil too often. The ONLY way it might come into play is if you have a situation where the mfg actually uses a break in oil or additive( some Hondas come to mind ). Changing that early could possibly cause you some grief. Most auto mfg's do not use special break in oils or additives however and if you want to change your oil every 1K it will have no bearing on your warranty.
So when the vapours from brand-new motor oil evaporate and get ingested into the intake through the PCV, where do they go? They go towards gunking up the throttle body, the intake idle air passages, the intake passages, and on some vehicles, even the intake valves! The idea behind not changing oil overly frequently, and following manufacturer's reommendations is to minimize the amount of these vapours that hit the PCV system, since the volatility of motor oil is at its peak when its brand new.
 Quote:
Also, changing your oil often is going to have no effect on instrumentation( I really don't get this one? ), 02 sensors, cat's, etc... The only way 02 sensors and cat's are effected by oil is if you have blow bye. Otherwise oil never touches either. Also not sure juste xactly what you mean by intake issues with changing oil too often either. No clue on that?
The 10% or so of a fill of brand-new modern oil that 'dissappears' during the ASTM 5800 ("Noack") test ends up in exhaust. This oil contains a phosphorous component that is damaging to instrumentation and cats. Its a well-documented issue, and all the evidence to date shows that phosphorous-based off-gassing from motor oil is, again, the highest during the initial period of service, and tapers off as the oil has been broken in. [
 
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 Originally Posted By: pitzel
 Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
I can guarantee you that no auto mfg will ever deny warranty coverage because you changed the oil too often. The ONLY way it might come into play is if you have a situation where the mfg actually uses a break in oil or additive( some Hondas come to mind ). Changing that early could possibly cause you some grief. Most auto mfg's do not use special break in oils or additives however and if you want to change your oil every 1K it will have no bearing on your warranty.
So when the vapours from brand-new motor oil evaporate and get ingested into the intake through the PCV, where do they go? They go towards gunking up the throttle body, the intake idle air passages, the intake passages, and on some vehicles, even the intake valves! The idea behind not changing oil overly frequently, and following manufacturer's reommendations is to minimize the amount of these vapours that hit the PCV system, since the volatility of motor oil is at its peak when its brand new.
 Quote:
Also, changing your oil often is going to have no effect on instrumentation( I really don't get this one? ), 02 sensors, cat's, etc... The only way 02 sensors and cat's are effected by oil is if you have blow bye. Otherwise oil never touches either. Also not sure juste xactly what you mean by intake issues with changing oil too often either. No clue on that?
The 10% or so of a fill of brand-new modern oil that 'dissappears' during the ASTM 5800 ("Noack") test ends up in exhaust. This oil contains a phosphorous component that is damaging to instrumentation and cats. Its a well-documented issue, and all the evidence to date shows that phosphorous-based off-gassing from motor oil is, again, the highest during the initial period of service, and tapers off as the oil has been broken in. [
IF you say so.
 
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