Can use Torque wrench Horizontally?

Can I use a clicker torque wrench horizontally to tighten my oil drain plug? If so, must I also reall try to get the threads clean of oul so as not to over torque as is common with oiled threads? Not looking or answers like, "get it good n tight".. I asked about torque wrenches.
 
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As long as the wrench is at 90 degrees to the fastener you will be fine. I always torque drain plugs-just wipe off the plug, insert in the hole and tighten. Whatever used oil is on the threads of the pan just acts as a lubricant.
 

SumpChump

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Oh I thought it specifically HAD to be pushed down vertically on a vertical plane (not the aircraft use of the word), and preferably nearing final torque click at about level. And hand pressure focused at middle of hand grip area.
 
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It also doesn't matter about the oiled threads. Think of how many DIYers and Jiffy Lubers leave the threads oily and enjoy success.
 

SumpChump

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Oh, I thought oiled threads added 30% un intended torque. But I bet the engineers knew an oil plug would never be dry. Right, little known to me ...deep in the factory ifficial manual it says, "ensure threads are cleaned with a solvent and inspected prior to replacing oil plug ." LOL. Probably the truth.
 
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The limitation to click type torque wrenches is that you must have a straight pull along with the above 90 degrees. If you are pulling up or down relative to the plane of the wrench it won't torque accurately. Also, the use of a crowfoot wrench requires a correction for the offset of the wrench from the fastener access. If the length of the wrench is changed by the crowfoot, that required a correction as well. Bottom line, you are fine.
 
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Same force applied to it. The wrench doesn't care. I don't think I've ever used a torque wrench on an oil drain volt. Six inch wrench, can't get much torque on it. I have to wonder if you put in the bolt finger tight if it would move at all.
 
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Nick1994

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Originally Posted By: eljefino
It also doesn't matter about the oiled threads. Think of how many DIYers and Jiffy Lubers leave the threads oily and enjoy success.
LOL Jiffy Lube torquing down an oil drain plug. Maybe with a 6 foot pipe on the end of a ratchet.
 

JC1

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Originally Posted By: Nick1994
LOL Jiffy Lube torquing down an oil drain plug. Maybe with a 6 foot pipe on the end of a ratchet.
LMAO. Good one ;-P Regards, JC.
 
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Originally Posted By: SumpChump
So AITG, as long as I PUSH to torque even though horizontal to the earth surface...I will be ok? What would be in error would be to PULL the wrench? If un understand correctly.
It is good that you understand torque and proper tool usage. Why bother using a good tool if you don't use it correctly (garbage in/garbage out)?? I see many people assume that because they are using a torque wrench, no matter how bad the technique is, they will get good results. WRONG - Remember that the accuracy and precision needed varies on the job at hand. Spark plugs, wheel lugs, oil plugs are important to be close enough. Head gasket fasteners need to be more accurate and more even/equal. Space shuttle fasteners......... - Fastener condition and prep? Lube vs. dry? This gets more critical as the job becomes more critical described above. But, people even debate lube/antiseize on wheel lugs and spark plugs. Research and make your own decision, because there is no consensus. - The 30% rule (you've been studying)? This is the established engineering +/- variance possible with a calibrated wrench due to many variables: fastener coating/condition/lube, and on and on. Tool errors. User errors, etc.. Quibbling about 3% vs. 4% new wrench accuracy is moot. FYI, with my last new vehicle (1.5 years old), the factory torque spec. for the oil pan bolt is 20 ft. lbs.. Curious about clean vs. oiled (impossible not to have dripping), I put a mark on the OEM factory bolt, removed it, then reinserted and torqued it to 20 ft. lbs (oily). The mark lined up, telling me that oiled threads didn't matter in this case. With head bolts, I would follow mfg. instructions. ALL torque wrench mfg. recommend to PULL the handle vs. PUSHING it. I think this is to ONLY prevent injury should something slip, but I am all ears if someone has a better answer. As stated by others, use the wrench in any position, but make sure you are pulling perpendicular (right angle) to the FASTENER, not "horizontal to earth", etc.. Don't pull in all twisted and contorted directions. Don't over think this, but it is commendable to learn correct, basic technique vs. the gorilla method. I, too, don't understand the "finger tight", "tight as can get" recommendations. I can (have) snap off lug bolts with a 18 inch breaker bar. "tight as can get" must be for very old or weenie types, LOL.
 
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Originally Posted By: SumpChump
So AITG, as long as I PUSH to torque even though horizontal to the earth surface...I will be ok? What would be in error would be to PULL the wrench? If un understand correctly.
Doesn't matter if you push or pull on the end of the handle (in the correct manner of course). It clicks when the torque setting is reached.
 
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I always use a torque wrench on my drain plugs. I have torque wrenches, I have the torque spec, so I see no reason not to do it.
 
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I've always pulled torque wrenches and never worried how they were lined up with the surface of the earth. I figured as long as they were lined up properly with bolt/nut that was being torqued all was well. For me, "pulling" allows more control. Just my two cents worth.
 
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Originally Posted By: stephen9666
I always use a torque wrench on my drain plugs. I have torque wrenches, I have the torque spec, so I see no reason not to do it.
And lug nuts same way. I was told that a properly torqued lug nut will prevent a warped disc brake rotor.
 
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Marshfield , MA
Originally Posted By: GreeCguy
Originally Posted By: stephen9666
I always use a torque wrench on my drain plugs. I have torque wrenches, I have the torque spec, so I see no reason not to do it.
And lug nuts same way. I was told that a properly torqued lug nut will prevent a warped disc brake rotor.
True, Even tightening in stages is waaay better. A torque wrench is fine but over kill. Lugs just need to be tight enough so the wheels don't fall off. I use the wrench provided by BMW to tighten the lugs. That way I know I can get the greased lugs off and not have the wheel stick to the hub because it is greased. grin2
 
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Originally Posted By: Nick1994
Originally Posted By: eljefino
It also doesn't matter about the oiled threads. Think of how many DIYers and Jiffy Lubers leave the threads oily and enjoy success.
LOL Jiffy Lube torquing down an oil drain plug. Maybe with a 6 foot pipe on the end of a ratchet.
Then final tightening with an impact and a tack weld.
 
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