0-65 mph within 90 seconds of cold start?

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5,628
Location
London, ON, Canada
Where I work, I regularly start my car (in any temps) and merely a minute to two minutes later am going 60-70mph. Helps the car warm up a lot faster than going as slow as possible...
 
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2,750
Location
Rochester, NY
My opinion is no more than 1/2 throttle, 1/2 of redline during warmup. Given a commute like this, I'd either drive to the next nearest exit before getting on, or drive an extra mile around the block before getting on.
 
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35,631
Location
NY
Originally Posted By: Bill in Utah
Originally Posted By: demarpaint
I would however idle the engine at least until it comes off its fast idle and settles in at around 1000 rpms before I took off.
If I waited till the RPM went down to 1000 RPM before putting it into gear and going I'd be idling for over 10 minutes when its cold. My cold start-up idle is close to 2000 RPM and even after driving it for 2-3 minutes the idle is still close to 1600. The high idle comes off when the water temp is around 180 degrees which at idling takes about 15 minutes when its single digits. I get 180 degrees with driving it in about 6-8 minutes. (This was one of my Daughters Science projects a few years ago) Bill
I'll have to look at the coolant temp when my idle hits 1000 rpms. Even at -5*F it never took longer than 3-4 minutes.
 
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18,449
Location
East of IGO
Originally Posted By: demarpaint
I don't think there is much of an issue, as long as the pedal isn't mashed to the floor. I would however idle the engine at least until it comes off its fast idle and settles in at around 1000 rpms before I took off. Now if you believe that engine pistons and bores [I forget the exact terminology] are out of round when cold and oil doesn't really protect until it reaches operating temps then that kind of driving is harmful to an engine. hide
The pistons are oval when cold, measure one. The bores/cyls are within tolerences round. FYI. And yes oil protects best when at operating temps but there is more to that and besides "usually" engines are pretty tough.
 
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35,631
Location
NY
Thanks, oval and out of round are close enough for the point I was trying to make. In the perfect world the OP's conditions are far from perfect. Does it matter? That is the real question. The vehicle is a machine, the best way to eliminate wear would be not to use it. smile
 
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6,318
Location
Canton, GA
i have a situation where i go up two steep hills after work.and their is ALWAY`S some butt head tailgating me because i`m not going fast enough for their already warmed up vehicle. smirk
 

Bill in Utah

Staff member
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12,849
Location
UT
Originally Posted By: demarpaint
Originally Posted By: Bill in Utah
Originally Posted By: demarpaint
I would however idle the engine at least until it comes off its fast idle and settles in at around 1000 rpms before I took off.
If I waited till the RPM went down to 1000 RPM before putting it into gear and going I'd be idling for over 10 minutes when its cold. My cold start-up idle is close to 2000 RPM and even after driving it for 2-3 minutes the idle is still close to 1600. The high idle comes off when the water temp is around 180 degrees which at idling takes about 15 minutes when its single digits. I get 180 degrees with driving it in about 6-8 minutes. (This was one of my Daughters Science projects a few years ago) Bill
I'll have to look at the coolant temp when my idle hits 1000 rpms. Even at -5*F it never took longer than 3-4 minutes.
I should also add this is per an scan gauge not the coolant temp in the car. And we did the test for her project with many vehicles. GM 4.8l V8, Ford 3.0l V6, Toyota 1.8l I4 and Honda 3.5l V6 and all warmed up *much* quicker being operated then idling. With the Toyota, I'd much rather be driving it at 2-3k going towards home then sitting at 2000 rpm with no load. Take care, Bill
 
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18,449
Location
East of IGO
Originally Posted By: demarpaint
Thanks, oval and out of round are close enough for the point I was trying to make. In the perfect world the OP's conditions are far from perfect. Does it matter? That is the real question. The vehicle is a machine, the best way to eliminate wear would be not to use it. smile
I agree 100%
 
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18,449
Location
East of IGO
Originally Posted By: lexus114
i have a situation where i go up two steep hills after work.and their is ALWAY`S some butt head tailgating me because i`m not going fast enough for their already warmed up vehicle. smirk
Getting rear ended will mess up your car way more than the pedal to the metal will ever do!!!. I really miss my 92 toyota truck.
 
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35,631
Location
NY
Originally Posted By: Steve S
Originally Posted By: demarpaint
Thanks, oval and out of round are close enough for the point I was trying to make. In the perfect world the OP's conditions are far from perfect. Does it matter? That is the real question. The vehicle is a machine, the best way to eliminate wear would be not to use it. smile
I agree 100%
thumbsup thumbsup I'd really like to think that modern engines, using modern oil should be protected enough that the conditions the OP mentioned are a non-event. Now a 7 grand hole shot on a stone cold engine is another story!
 
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558
Location
Orange Park, FL
Even with "modern" fuel injected engines, you have to let them warm up before you start driving them hard in the winter. Not saying you have to let it sit in the driveway or garage running for 5 minutes before you drive off, but you should drive it lightly (no hard acceleration) until the engine and trans build up heat.
 
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6,318
Location
Canton, GA
Originally Posted By: pavelow
Even with "modern" fuel injected engines, you have to let them warm up before you start driving them hard in the winter. Not saying you have to let it sit in the driveway or garage running for 5 minutes before you drive off, but you should drive it lightly (no hard acceleration) until the engine and trans build up heat.
i agree, thats what i try to do.
 
Messages
220
Location
Missouri
I'm not so concerned with a cold engine, I drive mine moderately after I start it up for the first few miles. What concerns me is the transmission. On my automatic Versa, when the temps are in the 20's, it takes a good 8 miles on the highway for it to go into overdrive and knock the rpm's down. I'm almost tempted to put one of those engine block heaters under the transaxle.
 
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17,301
Location
OH
As long as you use moderate throttle, and don't exceed 3500 revs or so, you should be fine. The engine will warm quickly when actually worked. M1 0W-40 should be good for winter, as would T6. The oil you are now using would be fine down to -4F, according to the OM for my four cylinder BMW e36.
 
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1,026
Location
Georgia
I want to touch off on a couple of points.... First you would think with the advent of fuel injection that this type of question would be long gone, fuel injection does away with so many issues. RPM's (not picking on the poster, just a inform) RPM = revolutions per minute so there is no place for the s on RPM's.. BUT I'm the worlds worst at english/literature/grammar so please don't take this as a bash, I just wanted to help with some terminology... I'm ignorant on so many things, so I'm in no way perfect If I'm not mistaken piston bores are now bored somewhat oval as the produces a better seal than a"round" which can never be true cylinder... Please do some research on this as car manufactures I have read put a lot of research into this. Maybe it's the piston is oval, or the correct term may be elliptical.. this is something worth researching. Steep hills do not present any more problem than a flat road.. It still takes a certain amount of fuel for the engine to warm up, this is very critical here, fuel=energy, and when the combustion process being so inefficient in a gas engine especially you get heat. If you think a gas engine has a long warm up time try a 3/4 ton or 1 ton truck with a diesel engine, the mass of the engine, extra cooling capacity, and the efficiency of teh diesel make for longer warm up times. Now when it's cold out, raining, snow etc (snow is rare here) still in the mornings I may let my car warm up in the drive way 10-15 minutes so it will be warm for my kids for school trip.. This is my decision, and if anyone thinks it's a huge waste of gas, etc I could care less because I don't hear many people freezing in their house to save gas.. I'm ashamed of all the bashing of women, and young people on this forum.. As in this thread you have seen a man done the very same thing throttle down, yet it's always a woman that has no idea how to drive/maintain a vehicle !! My mother can extract more mileage out of a car, engine than anyone in my family, all of us are boys.. I have also seen cell phone post as well where it's always a young teenager and then at that most times a female that is texting, or just dumb in general for some reason.. yet insurance rates don't like it's the males that have more accidents.. so that must mean in general women are better drivers ? If anything women are ignorant as to how to maintain a vehicle at the most.. and that ignorance would lead back to those who scuff, make fun of, or in general belittle them because they do not know, as for the ones who do know yet still do it, it's across the board males, females etc.. I'm no NAACP, woman rights, or any other freak, yet just by the postings on this forum I can see why those type of people/thinking exist in the world.. and if you really want to know just how dumb a woman is look at how many males are changing oil for females on this sight, girlfriends, coworkers, etc I commend you, however who has the power in this sector....
 
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1,084
Location
Ontario , Canada
Accelerate moderately and change the oil to a 0W40 synthetic ASAP , otherwise I would not be concerned . As you can see in my sig that's the oils I use in my vehicals and I'm up to 100km (60mph) withing 90secs of starting and leaving my driveway unless the weather is really [censored] and I have to clean Ice/snow then it runs for a bit while I do this . I'm in SW Ontario so about the same climate and weather conditions as you in NE Ohio .
 
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Messages
424
Location
Toronto, ON, Canada
You should give it 30 sec or so warm up! At around 32F/ 0C in Toronto, I feel my car do need some warm up. Issue 1) the engine does not response well in cold/not warmed up Issue 2) the engine sounds a lot harsher when pushed
 
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2,054
Location
Toronto-ish, Canada
Originally Posted By: Carzzz
You should give it 30 sec or so warm up! At around 32F/ 0C in Toronto, I feel my car do need some warm up. Issue 1) the engine does not response well in cold/not warmed up Issue 2) the engine sounds a lot harsher when pushed
IMO there's a couple of things at work here which don't include the engine needing to sit idling. Issue 1 can be a function of vehicle condition and design. Different operating parameters are absolutely necessary when running cold. If the engineers/computers/sensors/other equipment aren't doing a good job of supporting the process you may have drive-ability problems. Warming up is a workaround in this case. My vehicle responds a little different when absolutely cold, but has no issues with "response" and getting the job done no matter how cold it is. Issue 2 can be caused by the fact that the whole car is cold, not just the engine. By this I'm talking about exhaust mounts, engine mounts and that sort of thing. Depending on whether the exhaust system is hanging or supported by its hangers, it can be sitting differently or even touching nearby objects. Motor mounts are typically oil filled and that oil is thicker at 0C than it is in mid-summer so more NVH (noise, vibration, harshness) is conducted to the frame of the car. I've ALWAYS found (4 cars now) that, in general, my cars sound a little noisier and less refined in the winter even when fully warmed up. The exception might be sitting in the sun on a nice, calm day after being fully warmed up. As has been mentioned before, it's important to mention that everything is cold and needs to be warmed, not just the engine. Even non-moving parts change character when cold.
 
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