UOA targets

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Hello Oil Gurus! I am pretty new to this site and find myself pretty well addicted to it. My wife says that I am now officially a "no lifer". Anyhow, I have been reading many of the UOAs with great interest. Is there a list or file out there someplace to tell me what ranges each category should fall into and what significance each one has to my engine? I think I am getting a rough idea, but would like to have a "cheat sheet to reference as I peruse. Thanks!
 
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Oil Analyzers, Inc. list follows: Total Base Number - A measure of the reserve capability of the oil to counteract (neutralize) acid formation from combustion by-products. Typically evaluated for gasoline & diesel engine oils. TBN values decrease over the service life of a lubricant as it neutralizes acidic by-products. OXD - Causes viscosity increase, solids and acid formation, lacquer deposits and shortened equipment life. NOX - Causes sludge build-up and varnish. Causes acid by-product formation leading to increased oxidation. Fe - Iron cylinders, pistons, camshafts, crankshafts, gears, rocker arms, valve bridges, cam follower rollers, etc. Also cylinder heads and rust. Cr - Piston ring face ("chrome"), shafts, rings, and chromate from cooling systems. Pb - Babbit overlay and alloy matrix of connecting rod and crankshaft main bearings. Cu - Slipper (wrist pin) bushings, cam follower roller bushings, rocker arm clevis bushings, connecting rod bushings, camshaft thrust washers, oil coolers, and radiators. Sn - Piston plate coating, babbit overlay of connecting rod and crankshaft main bearings. Ni - Valve stems, valve guides, ring inserts on pistons. Ag - Bearing cages (low friction bearings), silver solder, turbocharger bearings & wrist pin bushings. Si - Silicone gaskets and sealant, silicone anti-foam additives, silica from airborne sand or dust (dirt). B - Coolant additive, lube oil additive. Na - Coolant additive, lube oil additive. Sodium is not a wear metal. It is an indicator of contamination by either coolant leaks, or the environment (external contamination, road salt, etc.) Mg - Lube oil alkaline (base) detergent used to neutralize acids formed by products of combustion in engine oils. Also found in aluminum alloys. Ca - Lube oil alkaline (base) detergent used to neutralize acids formed by products of combustion in engine oils. Ba - Detergent found in lube oil additives. P - Lube oil anti-wear/extreme pressure/antioxidant additive. Zn - Lube oil additive/extreme pressure/antioxidant additive. Mo - Lube oil friction modifier additive, anti-wear coating on some piston rings. Fuel - Improper adjustment of injection pump, injector, or fuel line leaks, excessive idling. Viscosity - Increases caused by contamination, oxidation, nitration, additive depletion. Decreases caused by fuel dilution or shearing of viscosity modifiers. Water - Coolant leak, condensation, outside source (contamination). Soot Level - Relative amount of soot from combustion, leading to poor engine performance, poor fuel economy, increased wear & shortened oil life due to increase in viscosity, (oil thickening). Solids - Usually soot or other combustion products with increased levels from high sulfur content fuels. Also generated from the processes of nitration and oxidation, or plugged filtration systems. Glycol - Coolant leak from head, block or cooler. 20W 5.6 - 9.3 30W 9.3 - 12.5 40W 12.5 - 16.3 50W 16.3 - 21.9 60W 21.9 - 26.1
 

pacers1994

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Thanks Benjamming That really helps explain the significance of the results. Do you have a list that details suggested mins and maxs of each component. For example how much is too much of fe or na?
 
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quote:
Originally posted by pacers1994: Thanks Benjamming That really helps explain the significance of the results. Do you have a list that details suggested mins and maxs of each component. For example how much is too much of fe or na?
Every engine has different ranges for "normal" Blackstone labs has alot of averages.
 
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