Toyota dominates study of longest lasting vehicles including full size pickups

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Originally Posted by mk378
Yes a seemingly large percentage of Land Cruisers still on the road are 20+ years old, but that's because there was a big boom for them in the 1990s, then relatively few new ones sold in the last two decades. ...
That's an example of how the list favors models that have been sold under the same name for a long time, but don't sell in the same numbers they did years ago. The ranking would be different if corrected for age.
 
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Originally Posted by hallstevenson
Originally Posted by mrsilv04
Hopefully, one of these years, Toyota will figure out that they can't sell the 2014/2007 Tundra forever...
If it ain't broke, don't fix it ?
There you go. Mine rides like a dream, has great power, and all the latest driver aids that I have disabled. smile
 

CKN

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Originally Posted by mrsilv04
Hopefully, one of these years, Toyota will figure out that they can't sell the 2014/2007 Tundra forever...
YEP.....................THIS!
 
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Originally Posted by CKN
Originally Posted by mrsilv04
Hopefully, one of these years, Toyota will figure out that they can't sell the 2014/2007 Tundra forever...
YEP.....................THIS!
Tundras are well made; that's for sure. But expensive and horrid gas mileage. I believe the new generation will use the great Turbo V6 engine designs like Ford. Until then, I couldn't afford to feed one. Our trusty old 2001 V8 is bad enough.
 
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The Tundra is old in the tooth. It really needs some fresh blood. I think the Prius needs to be put out to pasture or made exclusively only as a rental fleet or Uber/Lyft/Amazon/Doordash driver exclusive via closed-end inclusive lease. Kill the Mirai, sell your fuel cell project to Ballard or New Flyer and make an BEV Camry/Corolla/RAV4 and outsource the Highlander/Sienna to Subaru. As much as I bash the Toyota of the 2010s-now for having cheap interiors and taking a step backwards compared to the Toyota I grew up with, I'd still count on one to hit the 200K mark without breaking much of a sweat.
 
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JHZR2

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Originally Posted by wdn
What model has the highest percentage of cars with over 200,000 miles on them? Gee is that really a tough question to understand? Hint: neither the question nor the answer has anything to do with sales figures.
Hmmm... did you actually read the article? "More specifically, the study analyzed nearly 16 million used vehicle transactions to see which models owners keep over 200,000 miles most frequently." So it has everything to do with sales. And in some form, it has to do with numbers initially sold, where/how they were sold, how people keep their vehicles, what kind of transactions and condemnation criteria are used, resale values vs how they are "totaled" in collisions, fleet use, etc. Yes, lots of metrics influence this beyond used car lot sales being an absolute metric.
Originally Posted by SeaJay
My guess is that these are actual statistics from real data. Nothing fake about the numbers. However, how they are presented and what they mean are subject to interpretation.
Agreed.
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted by Cujet
Originally Posted by JHZR2
I don't know that I give much credence to this.
Truedelta.com took real world owner reports and parsed the data. It's accurate, and eye opening. Toyota took top honors. Of particular interest, the most reliable Toyota was an order of magnitude better than the typical Volkswagen Passat. I think Michael ran out of money or dedication and the truedelta site is no longer active, the data is still valid. His information had no agenda and it was not "initial quality" or some other silliness. His site shows the following: The most reliable car: Camry The most reliable pickup: Tundra The most reliable brand: Toyota
So.... per the rest of my post, I was surprised that the Accord edged out the Camry, and the Odyssey edged out the sienna. You post that Camry is most reliable, looking at true delta the odyssey is "less reliable" then the sienna. Since the 99-05(ish) odyssey was in the midst of transmission problems, and, is the right cross section to be hitting 200k+ miles at this point, it was interesting to read. It's interesting to read all the folks coming to "protect" Toyota. My position, as an owner of both and accord and odyssey, was surprise at their presence. So it's kind of funny to see others get their panties in a bunch over this. Kind of different when coming in from an angle of surprise that my vehicles we're on the list, huh?
 

4WD

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Some of the comments on Tundra are a bit harsh … They are solid "heavy half tons" … but I'll add a comment since I live in a PU truck intense part of the world. The Tundra units around here (made in Texas) are not used for work much at all. They are clean and shiny and if anything is hooked up, it's a small fishing boat ~ not a trailer of hay, farm equipment, livestock, or gas compressor components. The Taco' around here at least get as dirty as the other trucks ~ but more as a young dudes play thing versus the farmer, rancher, or rig Toolpusher, taking them on beat up dirt roads loaded down or towing.
 
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Originally Posted by 4WD
Some of the comments on Tundra are a bit harsh … They are solid "heavy half tons" … but I'll add a comment since I live in a PU truck intense part of the world. The Tundra units around here (made in Texas) are not used for work much at all. They are clean and shiny and if anything is hooked up, it's a small fishing boat ~ not a trailer of hay, farm equipment, livestock, or gas compressor components. The Taco' around here at least get as dirty as the other trucks ~ but more as a young dudes play thing versus the farmer, rancher, or rig Toolpusher, taking them on beat up dirt roads loaded down or towing.
Around here, most of the Ford's Chevys and Dodges don't have a scratch on them. Point: There are full sized trucks by everyone that aren't used for real work. The number one selling vehicle in the country is the Ford f-series. Pretty obvious nowhere near all of them are used for work.
 

JTK

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They better last considering the 84 month loan it takes to 'afford' one. LOL I believe they last because people make them last. Seriously though. I love them, I just could never justify the Toyota tax on anything beyond a Corolla or Camry.
 
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Originally Posted by JTK
They better last considering the 84 month loan it takes to 'afford' one. LOL I believe they last because people make them last. Seriously though. I love them, I just could never justify the Toyota tax on anything beyond a Corolla or Camry.
Toyota's generally hold their value much better. Paying a little more on the front end is well worth it. As for "people making them last". No amount of maintenance can make up for bad engineering and/or cheaper parts. That's why Toyota's generally last longer and have fewer problems. Better engineering and higher quality parts.
 

4WD

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Just heard the Car Pro say something different. Guy was looking at the Taco and Colorado. Said if you plan to go 250k, get Taco, 150k … get Chevy for lower upfront cost (time value of money) and greater comfort for those miles … Guess neither is worth much at the end of those runs …
 

JTK

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Originally Posted by PowerSurge
Toyota's generally hold their value much better. Paying a little more on the front end is well worth it. As for "people making them last". No amount of maintenance can make up for bad engineering and/or cheaper parts. That's why Toyota's generally last longer and have fewer problems. Better engineering and higher quality parts.
I'm sort of with you on the resale thing, but you pay more to maybe get more, so it's kind of a wash in the end. Problem is, living in the rust belt like I do, you're often rusted out before the better engineered, higher quality parts have a chance to show their value.
 
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Originally Posted by benhen77
Originally Posted by hallstevenson
Originally Posted by mrsilv04
Hopefully, one of these years, Toyota will figure out that they can't sell the 2014/2007 Tundra forever...
If it ain't broke, don't fix it ?
Except that the Tundra is kind of an afterthought in the full size pickup market. If Toyota put the same effort into the Tundra that they put into RAV4/Camry/Corolla, I bet they could take a decent slice of the full size truck market. .
Their 1st-generation was poorly thought out. Size-wise it was more like a Dakota (not Ranger small but not F150 big) and with a 6-cylinder. The latest generation has 5.7L V8. My brother has one and he'll drive it until it quits, if it ever does... It's his work truck too, pulling work trailers, trailers with Bobcats, and his boat on weekends. When it quits, I know what he'll replace it with too.
 
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Originally Posted by hallstevenson
Originally Posted by benhen77
Originally Posted by hallstevenson
Originally Posted by mrsilv04
Hopefully, one of these years, Toyota will figure out that they can't sell the 2014/2007 Tundra forever...
If it ain't broke, don't fix it ?
Except that the Tundra is kind of an afterthought in the full size pickup market. If Toyota put the same effort into the Tundra that they put into RAV4/Camry/Corolla, I bet they could take a decent slice of the full size truck market. .
Their 1st-generation was poorly thought out. Size-wise it was more like a Dakota (not Ranger small but not F150 big) and with a 6-cylinder. The latest generation has 5.7L V8. My brother has one and he'll drive it until it quits, if it ever does... It's his work truck too, pulling work trailers, trailers with Bobcats, and his boat on weekends. When it quits, I know what he'll replace it with too.
Trying to remember back then... wasn't there more of a mid-size market? You had the mini trucks (Ranger, S10, Taco) and then there was the Dakota. Not sure if Toyota wanted to run with the training wheels on in the mid size, or if that was their plan, to corner the market there. Dunno. Wait, there was the T100 too, almost forgot about that. THAT was the mid size. So first gen Tundra was something of an oddball.
 
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These forums are nothing more than brand loyality. Ford, GM, and Toyota brand loyalist will never change their ways. Every brand has their pros and cons. It's a car/truck not an investment. A car or truck is just a tool to get you from point a to point b. Insider hint...the Company Brass only cares about profit and customers are always the last priority. Auto manufactures are just like sports teams. Convince a consumer to buy their product and let them believe they make a difference. It all a ploy to get your money.
 
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Originally Posted by supton
Trying to remember back then... wasn't there more of a mid-size market? You had the mini trucks (Ranger, S10, Taco) and then there was the Dakota. Not sure if Toyota wanted to run with the training wheels on in the mid size, or if that was their plan, to corner the market there. Dunno. Wait, there was the T100 too, almost forgot about that. THAT was the mid size. So first gen Tundra was something of an oddball.
I'd have to look into the Tundra history but the T100 is a good point. I thought the T100 evolved into the Tundra ? The T100 is probably what I was thinking of when I referred to the Dakota-sized truck with, I presume, a 6-cylinder engine. When Toyota asked their dealers why T100s weren't selling, their dealers (and in turn, customers) told them, "you have to offer a full-size truck with a V8".
 
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I question some of the data. They have the Audi TT as the most relaible sports car with the highest percentage on the raod, that makes no sense. IT is not even the most relaible Audi sports car. Mythinks they left a bunch of the N/A AMG's, the IS-F's and R35 GTR out of their calculations as well.
 
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Originally Posted by mk378
Yes a seemingly large percentage of Land Cruisers still on the road are 20+ years old, but that's because there was a big boom for them in the 1990s, then relatively few new ones sold in the last two decades.
I'm surprised the Ranger didn't make the list, since it has to be a current model, but they sold scads of them in the 80's and 90's but then quit making them in 2012 until recently restarting. Who knows, maybe Rangers are so cheap that people don't bother to keep them on the road when they get old? In my experience, they are tough little trucks with a durable drivetrain.
 
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