The ‘Yoda was rear ended

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Nov 21, 2020
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140
I’m a body shop technician/foreman and the skill level of body techs has a HUGE spread. We have a full i-car certification but that doesn’t mean ****. I oversee all the repairs and I tell my techs this: “You’re messing with the safety of our clients by doing a substandard repair. If you can’t do it correctly you’ll be working elsewhere “.
That said, there are some aftermarket parts that are of decent quality. First you need to buy CAPA certified parts. Second, close inspection when you receive the part. Third, EVERYTHING is test fitted before paint work to ensure a quality fit and finish.
As for paint, it’s all in what you buy. I use PPG waterborne base with a high end clear coat. My paint looks nicer than factory and covers better. You’d be surprised at how little paint the factories put on. Some Honda’s and most GM cars in silver you can see through the color to the sealer at certain angles.
Lastly is proper corrosion protection application. Every quarter panel, door skin, or welded repair we do gets comprehensive rust preventative measures. Even new factory door shells get corrosion inhibitor regardless if the factory applied any. What we do is probably better than the factory in most cases but it’s necessary when a corrosion prone area is repaired.
My paint work is warranted as long as you own your car, and I give a five year corrosion warranty.
Refreshing to read. Chasing hailstorms i have been in alot of body shops around the country, and it is frightening what some shops turn out. When i was a shop tech, as well as a manager, safety took precedence over all else. “Micky Mouse” seems to be the norm in most shops now days.
Speaking of GM finishes, do you remember when white diamond pearl first came out? Their mottling issues where out of control, and it all boiled down to them applying the material too thin. Back in the day, i ran into a brand new white diamond Escalade that made me second guess my career choice. Non blend able for sure. Had Dupont reps flying people in trying to help with color match. Even tried replicating the mottling in the finish to no avail. Ended up painting everything but the roof and the liftgate when it was all said and done. At the end of the day it looked like a show car! Lol
 

CKN

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I hope you’re right, but it’ll have 1 accident on it too. Do they go into depth on how much damage was done?

We looked at a few used 4R’s and lost interest for that very reason.
If you trade it in you can have a civilized dialog with the used car appraiser. I have done that that a few times. I had a passenger front quarter panel dented by a shopping cart on a 4Runner. They painted and replaced the whole panel. Never noted on the Carfax. The used car manager noticed the numbers didn't match on the lip under the hood (the paint was perfect) and I explain to him it was a very minor repair-and I'm sure he could tell as well. It was front lined at the Chevy used car lot-and it would have been terrible for someone like you to pass it up because of a very minor repair. It sold in less than a week. Absolutely no effect what so ever on resale.
 
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dlundblad

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What I would do is take pictures of the damages you have right now (If it’s minor). If it’s just a bumper cover and some scratches, and there’s no sign of any extensive damage you can use that to your advantage when you sell it. And if the bumper cover is going to be replaced, ask the body shop to take pictures for you of the lack of damage underneath that bumper.

I personally bought a vehicle in the past that was in a previous accident and it hurt me when I went to sell the vehicle three years later. I could nit sell it private party unless I basically gave it away. Half the people flat out had no interest once they discovered it was in a previous accident...the other half used it as a negotiating tool and low balled me to the point where it was worthless. Same on trade in years later. So keep those pictures for PROOF that all you received was a little tiny bump. None of this is the end of the world either. You’ll keep that SUV a long long time and enjoy every second of it. And no matter what 5-10 years from now, if you take good care of it someone will buy it.
I’ll do that. The body guy will take photos for me.

I took my $1500 Jeep there to get some rust repaired on the dog leg and he took several photos for me. The repairs cost $2500. Lol.
 
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I’m a body shop technician/foreman and the skill level of body techs has a HUGE spread. We have a full i-car certification but that doesn’t mean ****. I oversee all the repairs and I tell my techs this: “You’re messing with the safety of our clients by doing a substandard repair. If you can’t do it correctly you’ll be working elsewhere “.
That said, there are some aftermarket parts that are of decent quality. First you need to buy CAPA certified parts. Second, close inspection when you receive the part. Third, EVERYTHING is test fitted before paint work to ensure a quality fit and finish.
As for paint, it’s all in what you buy. I use PPG waterborne base with a high end clear coat. My paint looks nicer than factory and covers better. You’d be surprised at how little paint the factories put on. Some Honda’s and most GM cars in silver you can see through the color to the sealer at certain angles.
Lastly is proper corrosion protection application. Every quarter panel, door skin, or welded repair we do gets comprehensive rust preventative measures. Even new factory door shells get corrosion inhibitor regardless if the factory applied any. What we do is probably better than the factory in most cases but it’s necessary when a corrosion prone area is repaired.
My paint work is warranted as long as you own your car, and I give a five year corrosion warranty.
So, this resonates with me. I’m one of those people with a Good, if not Great, Carmax turnout. My 2014 Lexus came from there, and the whole thing is kinda funny. Part of my positive experience is that the warranty paid for itself, as I found about $2500 worth of issues and they fixed them all. But the other thing is this- they had to repaint 3 areas of the car, which is also their max allowable. Pretty sure it came with new front bumper, headlamps, right front fender repaint and left front fender repaint. Not sure how it got within the 3 surface rule, but the hood was also sprayed, as the paint settled into chips underneath. The luster from the resprayed areas is better than the oem. Oddly enough, I feel better about the whole thing because good work is good work. I have no issue driving a vehicle repaired by someone who did great work.
 
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Well...I have traded in two cars with minor accidents-one of them was a 4Runner. The effect on trade in values was ZERO. They tried to "work it" and I told them to stop playing games.
You're exactly right. The next buyer will finance it and not see the title. Even if they run a carfax and skip it someone else will come along and pay top dollar.
 
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I had a terrible battle with someone who had Geico that hit me. Finally had to file a claim with my own insurance company. My insurance then settled with Geico for almost 100% of the claim.

NEVER -EVER will I do business with Geico-no matter how cheap they are-supposedly.
This isn't directed at you, but at every driver out there.

Collisions aren't fun. It's everybody's duty to avoid one.

I have one of the "big" companies that advertise on TV. I've used a couple and flip flop for better intro rates. I drive defensively and expect others do to the same; if they don't, they can face the wrath of my tightwad carrier.
 
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At least she didn’t have Geico LOL. . Everyone that has hit me or my dad has had Geico and they will not do anything for you. It’s always a nasty battle with them. Sorry about your 4Runner those are very nice cars also very tough too. I would not take anything but factory for something that new and aftermarket probably would not be available yet anyway.
The funny about Geico is that they are Warren Buffett’s main money maker - besides paint, batteries, underwear and milkshakes but I would never recommend them to anyone who asks me. Now, Ben Moore, Duracell, Fruit of the Loom and Dairy Queen, I’ll recommend 2 out of those 4.
 

dlundblad

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The insurance came out and looked at it. $750 in damage. OE parts. Rear bumper and the silver cover.

I need to double check, but I was hoping the foam behind the bumper would get replaced too. In the appraisers defense, the whole thing is raved back to normal so there’s just a visual scuff now. Maybe the foam is okay.
 
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The insurance came out and looked at it. $750 in damage. OE parts. Rear bumper and the silver cover.

I need to double check, but I was hoping the foam behind the bumper would get replaced too. In the appraisers defense, the whole thing is raved back to normal so there’s just a visual scuff now. Maybe the foam is okay.
Preliminary estimate is only written for what the adjuster can physically see. Once the shop removes the rear cover, they will supplement if additional “hidden” damage is found.
 

dlundblad

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The insurance came out and looked at it. $750 in damage. OE parts. Rear bumper and the silver cover.

I need to double check, but I was hoping the foam behind the bumper would get replaced too. In the appraisers defense, the whole thing is raved back to normal so there’s just a visual scuff now. Maybe the foam is okay.
“Flexed” not is raved.

‘Twas too early with not enough coffee.
 
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Reading the OP's post really made me cringe; sucks big time that your property gets damaged due to someone else's negligence and/or carelessness.

There are reputable body shops where even an owner can't tell the vehicle was in a wreck after fixing -insurance or not. It's just making sure that it is taken to a good body shop.

I completely agree with your statement. My Envoy got rear-ended in July by a Yukon Denali that swerved behind me at speeds in excess of 100 MPH (I had cruise set to 80 MPH at the time of the collision). There was no frame damage; however the driver's side of the tailgate and part of the bumper took the hit. Both parts had to be replaced. I personally choose to go with OEM, or CAPA certified parts if OE is not available for whatever reason. OEM was not available on the local market, just cheap aftermarket junk. But OE parts were still available in the U.S. and after it took 3 months to get here by sea freight, the vehicle was ready to go to a very reputable body shop that primarily works on exotics. My vehicle was literally the cheapest valued vehicle in the shop, but they still took on the job (mostly because they knew I wasn't looking to cut corners) and did a marvelous job at that.

Granted everything was replaced, right down to new badges/emblems and a trailer hitch cover, I honestly could not tell the difference when they were done. The fit and finish was perfect and the paint was perfectly matched to the rest of the vehicle (they exclusively use Nippon Paint). The tailgate and rear glass would open and close just like it did before the collision, and there were no gaps, etc.

It all depends who you take it to and how skilled they are. Of course, these shops will command a premium but IMHO, it is worth the extra money if you intend on keeping the vehicle.
 
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