Thanks and some info.

Joined
May 31, 2022
Messages
6
So I changed my oil in my 2013 Mustang GT today. Based on advice here and elsewhere I went with Pennzoil Platinum 5w30 and a Motorcraft filter. Thanks for everyone that weighed in!

Change went smooth. The last guy that put on my oil filter did it right and I was able to take it off by hand. Huzzah!

I changed a lot of oil with my dad as a kid but this was the first DIY in 20 years. How I did it:

Drove car until oil temp was on the low end of normal.

Checked to see if I could get the filter off before draining oil.

Let it cool until I could hold hand on oil pan for 10 seconds without burn.

Drained oil, waited for a drip every 2-3 seconds.

Took off oil filter (made a mess because of plastic airfoil that only flops down). Used a ziplock bag to catch most of the spillage. Glad I had an oil blanket!

Got about 1/3 cup more oil to drain out of pan when filter came off (had put a secondary oil container under the drip).

Let it drain for another 20 mins.

Primed filter and lubed seal. Hand tightened.

Put in drain plug, added 7.5 quarts of oil.

Checked dipstick then added another .5qt of oil to get to top of dipstick range.

Fired her up, checked oil pressure. Let run a couple minutes then checked dipstick again and for leaks underneath.

No problems, huzzah!
 
Joined
Oct 27, 2018
Messages
660
Location
MD
Your dad wasn't kidding when he made you help him change oil as a kid back in the day.
IMO, for a healthy person, if you can't work on your car, you don't deserve to drive it.
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2021
Messages
279
Your dad wasn't kidding when he made you help him change oil as a kid back in the day.
Or in my case, aunt. Also spark plugs, cap and wires, and tire rotation. Aunt Carol is a badass, was changing her own oil in the carport up until a couple years ago. She drives electric now at age 77.
 

MilesTeg

Thread starter
Joined
May 31, 2022
Messages
6
Your dad wasn't kidding when he made you help him change oil as a kid back in the day.
IMO, for a healthy person, if you can't work on your car, you don't deserve to drive it.
My Dad was an engineer (i.e. the kind that does mechanical work) for a mining company. He and I did every kind of mechanical maintenance or repair you could imagine on our family cars short of a complete engine, differential or transmission rebuild. Seems like the repairs always needed to happen in the middle of winter, hah!

I didn't much like it most of the time, but I am glad these days to have that knowledge. Recently my interest in DIY has been rekindled.
 
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