Stripped oil pan

Messages
22
Location
Orlando
Hello, I have a 2008 Honda odyssey and the threads inside the oil pan have been stripped. However, only the first four or five threads are stripped and there are still three or four good threads in the back, see picture. I bought a longer drain plug and it seem to catch the back threads and I was able to tighten it snug. Is this an acceptable fix?

071AF0F6-92B7-445D-BF86-9496B926B954.jpeg
 
Messages
25
Location
Harleysville, Pa
I'm not an oil expert, but I am a machinist. If you are able to fully engage the good threads and tighten the nut so it doesn't leak, it's probably fine (at least in the short term). If you are just grabbing one thread to tighten, get it fixed professionally ASAP. You should still get it fixed or replace the pan.
 
Messages
25,433
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Short term it will hold but every time it is removed and tightened there is the chance of the rest of the thread failing. Buy this, repair it properly on the car then sell the tool. This is why a torque wrench is helpful when dealing with aluminum pans especially those on Honda vehicles. Time Sert Edit: I see they offer this one, it includes a tap guide which may be helpful if you don't do this sort of work often and have some guides. For Oil Pans
 
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Messages
23,380
Location
CA
New pan, but a time-sert kit will work as well. Rockauto has aftermarket oil pans available for about $60, which is cheaper than the time-sert kit. Oil Pan replacement is not a terrible job on those engines once you remove the exhaust pipe.
 
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Messages
369
Location
New Jersey
It should be fine as long as you don't over tighten it in the future. Might wrap the threads in some teflon tape to help seal it. Teflon acts as a lubricant so be EZ on the torque applied. Check for leaks.
 
Messages
443
Location
Nevada
If you can grab those 3 or 4 good threads as shown in the picture, you will be fine as long as you don't overtighten.
 
Messages
16,552
Location
Upper Midwest
I repaired a similar Honda oil pan on a friend's Civic, the threads were stripped just the same. I ended up replacing the pan since that was less expensive than a TImesert kit.
 
Messages
3,442
Location
Austin, TX MSA
Originally Posted by Trav
Short term it will hold but every time it is removed and tightened there is the chance of the rest of the thread failing. Buy this, repair it properly on the car then sell the tool. This is why a torque wrench is helpful when dealing with aluminum pans especially those on Honda vehicles. Time Sert Edit: I see they offer this one, it includes a tap guide which may be helpful if you don't do this sort of work often and have some guides. For Oil Pans
In the comments of the part that you linked, Time Sert says not to use it for drain plug repair, instead use this product Alternate tool link Now, knowing that you are a professional mechanic, I'm sure you could make either part work, just pointing it out that the manufacturer suggests a different part than you originally linked to.
 
Messages
695
Location
GA
I'd get it good and dry with some brake cleaner and use a clean, dry bolt. If that didn't hold I'd tap it one size bigger. Make sure you keep it the same SAE or metric. Just don't put that one new bolt in one of the other holes or you'll have to do another one!
 
Messages
10,002
Location
Waco, TX
Originally Posted by heynow
If you can grab those 3 or 4 good threads as shown in the picture, you will be fine as long as you don't overtighten.
And also use a vacuum oil extractor from this point forward! Never touch the drain plug again!
 
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