Storing snow tires

Joined
Jan 12, 2008
Messages
517
Location
Long Island, NY
The key to storing tires is to keep them unloaded, away from contaminants (especially oil) and away from sources of ozone = electric motors.

Ideally, they should be stored in a bag of nitrogen in a cold environment.

Then re-inflate them just before use.
So in the not ideal of being in the shed, stacked on top of each other 8 high, and 8 more side by side under shelf, should pressure be reduced and to what amount?

This was the first year I had something that I never checked. I was putting the snows on the Pilot (Conti WinterContact Si) that were mounted on factory rims in November 2018. I took valve cap off to check air pressure and one was leaking air. I screwed cap back on and it stopped. I checked air pressure and it was the same as the other 3, down about 6psi. Took off cap and tapped the valve core needle a couple times, no change. Used my valve core tool and it was about 1/2 turn loose. I then removed/inspected cleaned and light coat of silicone grease on the seal and reinstalled it. I checked all the other tires 11 tires being swapped and all were tight.

I might buy some more of the Honda valve caps as it looks like they have a small O-ring in them to help seal. Not to rely on them, just an added thing.
 

Sam_Julier

$50 Site Donor 2023
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May 22, 2012
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I wear out snow tires in 3 seasons. Summer tires in about 5.

They get stacked in the basement or shed in spot I can find.
 
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Joined
Nov 20, 2013
Messages
780
Location
Eastern Wa.
All my winter tires are mounted on rims, I stack them in the garage not bagged. I have some cardboard on the concrete and I rotate them monthly so the bottom tire moves to the top. Been doing this for decades never had any issues
 
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Messages
364
Location
Ontario, Canada
The key to storing tires is to keep them unloaded, away from contaminants (especially oil) and away from sources of ozone = electric motors.

Ideally, they should be stored in a bag of nitrogen in a cold environment.

Then re-inflate them just before use.

Trying out a new solution this year for my two sets.

Bought the largest sized vacuum sealed storage bags - 110cm x 100cm.

To remove the air, it comes with a manual pump or an attachment for portable dyson vacuums.

Bags are advertised to be reusable but that remains to be seen.

Total cost: $11 for 8 bags + $27 for shipping
= $38USD

Winter tires are going on tomorrow so will post a follow up photo soon.

IMG_7309.JPG
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
5,229
Location
Northeast
Place each tire in a clear 39 gallon lawn bag and close with a twist tie . Usually use 2 bags for the winter tires with studs so not to puncture the bags . Keep the tires upright and rotate them every month so not to get flat spots .
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
4,305
Location
Somewhere in the US
So in the not ideal of being in the shed, stacked on top of each other 8 high, and 8 more side by side under shelf, should pressure be reduced and to what amount?

This was the first year I had something that I never checked. I was putting the snows on the Pilot (Conti WinterContact Si) that were mounted on factory rims in November 2018. I took valve cap off to check air pressure and one was leaking air. I screwed cap back on and it stopped. I checked air pressure and it was the same as the other 3, down about 6psi. Took off cap and tapped the valve core needle a couple times, no change. Used my valve core tool and it was about 1/2 turn loose. I then removed/inspected cleaned and light coat of silicone grease on the seal and reinstalled it. I checked all the other tires 11 tires being swapped and all were tight.

I might buy some more of the Honda valve caps as it looks like they have a small O-ring in them to help seal. Not to rely on them, just an added thing.
Lots to unpack. Pressure first.

I think that deflating the tires during storage actually makes things worse. The less pressure trying to force oxygen through the tire is offset by the fresh (meaning fully oxygenated) air that is put in later. Plus, the tires don't flatspot as much with full pressure.

Stacking, sidewall to sidewall: I think 4 high is OK. Cardboard between would be better, but if not, white side to white side. The black sides will bleed into the white. Don't put anything on top of the stack.

Standing up or leaning against each other. I think that is OK. Again, don't put anything on top og them.
 
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