Sil-Glide Grease for sliding pins, pad ears, etc

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In the past, when I've been getting ready for a brake job, I've normally grabbed one or two of those little packets of brake grease at the parts store counter. I use the orange CRC goop on the back of pads, but always like to pull the sliding pins, clean and grease them, and also put a bit of grease on the pad ears or any other pad sliding surface(not sure if that's the right practice or not, but it's also very unusual that I have squeaky brakes or have any trouble getting pads/hardware out at the next pad change).

The other day, I spotted a big tube of something called Sil-Glide on the shelf that seems to report being more or less the same thing as the little packets(a high temperature silicone grease for sliding surfaces). I grabbed it, but I can't seem to find a lot of references to using it as a brake grease. Does anyone use this stuff for this application? If not this, what do you suggest that I can buy in bulk that will do a similar job?

There's some motivation behind my question in that I'm getting ready to do a full poly bushing job on the MG, and most of the advice out there is to grease the inside of the bushings with a silicone brake grease(or the "magic sauce" some bushing makers supply that looks just like it) to prevent sqeaking down the road. I'm using graphite impregnated bushings that are not supposed to have that problem, but the "belt and suspenders" approach seems right. I'm also wondering if this grease can work in that application.
 

JRed

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Been using the same tube of Sil-Glyde when I do brake jobs and bushings for years. I think I bought the tube for $5 vs $2 for the little packets and I've used it for all kinds of stuff. It isn't quite as thick as the stuff in the packets in my experience but silicone grease is silicone grease for the most part.

I use a little anti-seize on the ears of pads and brake drum hardware.
 
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I have used sil-glyde for brake pins for a few years now, it's great. I haven't had any issues with it drying out or having an adverse effect on pin boots.

I can't speak on how it would interact with poly, you may want to ring up the manufacturer, American Grease Stick, and see they say.
 
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I don't know about using Sil-Glyde for sliding surfaces, I've only used it on the pins. For the sliding surfaces I bought a tube of Honda M77 (as recommended by The_Critic) and that seems to work for me.
 
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It's mostly castor oil mixed with a small bit of silicone. From my experience, it works fine and doesn't swell rubber parts. I used it for sliding pins. Nothing last long on the ears anyway. It gets dry by the time the next brake pads needed to be replaced, which for me is probably much longer than for most of you.

Now I use silicone paste for everything involving brakes.
 
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I settled on Sil-Glyde after trying a few other products. It works well and doesn't get sticky as it dries, causing issues it's supposed to prevent (looking at you, Permatex).

FYI: Sil-Glyde is Sil-Glyde. Depending on where you buy it it's sometimes marketed as an all-purpose rubber-safe lubricant and others it's marketed specifically as brake lube. It's all the same stuff.
 
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It works great on slide pins, but will not last very long on areas that are exposed to the outside environment.

If you subscribe to the theory of lubing caliper contact points and pad ears, I would consider M77 paste from a Honda dealership.
 
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It works well and doesn't get sticky as it dries
My Dad had a tube of Sil-Glyde in the garage that I used and I don't know the age of it, but I can confidently say that it seems to have a usable shelf life. I used it on one of our cars and when I went to do a "service" on that same car, the Sil-Glyde was like tacky glue. Where it was really bad was the back of the brake pads / caliper ears. I had to pry the pad off of the caliper ! I tossed that tube at that point and bought fresh stuff.

Using the fresh stuff on our Fusion in May '18, I serviced them in the past month and the slide pins moved nicely and still had a film of Sil-Glyde on them.

I don't use Sil-Glyde on the pad ears or caliper though. I use Permatex ceramic lubricant or their anti-seize there.
 

bunnspecial

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Thanks everyone.

Sounds like it's a decent choice at least on sliding pins. I'll research before I start slathering it on poly bushings.
 
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It's mostly castor oil mixed with a small bit of silicone. From my experience, it works fine and doesn't swell rubber parts. I used it for sliding pins. Nothing last long on the ears anyway. It gets dry by the time the next brake pads needed to be replaced, which for me is probably much longer than for most of you.

Now I use silicone paste for everything involving brakes.
Even on the backing plate of the brake pads and ears?
 
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Even on the backing plate of the brake pads and ears?
Depending on the environment, don't expect it to stay there. How long it may stay, no one can answer. When people talk about doing a "brake service", that just means removing the pads, slide pins, etc, cleaning all the surfaces and re-lubricating things. Why ? Because over time it gets washed away and so on. Now, slide pin boots generally do a very good job keeping the slide pins protected and lubricated but the other surfaces are exposed.
 
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I use Sil-Glyde on slide pins. I use this on the brake pad ears I use this: Permatex Green No problems to report, even on roads coated with salt in anticipation of snow.
 
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In the past, when I've been getting ready for a brake job, I've normally grabbed one or two of those little packets of brake grease at the parts store counter. I use the orange CRC goop on the back of pads, but always like to pull the sliding pins, clean and grease them, and also put a bit of grease on the pad ears or any other pad sliding surface(not sure if that's the right practice or not, but it's also very unusual that I have squeaky brakes or have any trouble getting pads/hardware out at the next pad change).

The other day, I spotted a big tube of something called Sil-Glide on the shelf that seems to report being more or less the same thing as the little packets(a high temperature silicone grease for sliding surfaces). I grabbed it, but I can't seem to find a lot of references to using it as a brake grease. Does anyone use this stuff for this application? If not this, what do you suggest that I can buy in bulk that will do a similar job?

There's some motivation behind my question in that I'm getting ready to do a full poly bushing job on the MG, and most of the advice out there is to grease the inside of the bushings with a silicone brake grease(or the "magic sauce" some bushing makers supply that looks just like it) to prevent sqeaking down the road. I'm using graphite impregnated bushings that are not supposed to have that problem, but the "belt and suspenders" approach seems right. I'm also wondering if this grease can work in that application.
For poly bushings, you need something tackier to stay on the poly bushing, like Prothane Super Grease.

 
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Even on the backing plate of the brake pads and ears?
If you're asking if I use silicone paste on those areas, sure but I only put a little bit on the contact ring surface of the brake piston. Sometimes the ears but I don't view those points as necessary. Sometimes I put a bit of permatex brake grease on the ears/hardware-clips just to use the tube a bit. I originally bought that green permatex since it said it was for caliper pins but that swelled the rubber boot and bushing and I will never do that again.
 
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Used this for my rear brakes, My mechanic used this on the ears, pins and the backing plate. Two years and 16K miles later, the grease on the ears has washed off. However, the grease on the backing plate hardened up.

Also two years ago, the patent for Syl Glide expired and people found out the grease is mostly castor oil with 2% silicone.
 
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Copper anti seize works great on pad ears and contact surfaces that are exposed to elements. I would not use rubber safe grease outside of caliper pins because it dries out and only attracts dirt and grime.
Copper anti-seize also dries out when applied on pads ears. At least that has been my experience with the 3M one.

Very few products "last" when exposed to the elements if you only apply a thin coat.
 
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I've used syl-glyde without issue. But I used it up. I bought this to try on my next brake job.
IMG_20210106_215818647.jpg
 
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