Sealing Redundant Door

gathermewool

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LARGEST GAP IS 1/2" The door doesn't seal well and has been bothering me since we moved in a couple of years ago. In the afternoon, I can feel the heat coming through some of the worst parts of the poorly-installed door. From the outside, with music blasting, I can hear a major difference when I pull the door hard toward me, connecting the seal more fully. This door is redundant - it has been used ZERO times since we've moved in. We use the sliding door to access the deck. When this section of the house was added by the previous owners (living room over garage), it's almost as if it was an afterthought. What's the best way to semi-permanently seal it. // If we ever do a major renovation, it'll likely be replaced with just a window, though I'll likely be too cheap to actually opt for that if I can seal it off well enough! Here are the pics. I didn't clean, because, well, I've got a lot more going on than needing to pretend my house is actually ever cleaner than it looks in these pics! [Linked Image] [Linked Image]
 
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If you don't ever use it, just get rid of it. A few 2x4's and some drywall and paint. Never no it was there.
 
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Yes adjust the door jam latch more towards the inside. you will have to pull the door harder to close. Otherwise just replace the weather stripping and scoot it a bit forward of the previous one.
 

gathermewool

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My wife wants the sunlight. Would using closed-cell foam actually make more sense in this case? -------------------------------------------- Note: I'm a total newb carpenter. My wife wants the light there for all the plants she intends to kill throughout the year. The largest gap is on the outswing side. The door will literally never be used in the next few years or until we demo the door and replace it with a window (beyond my skill-set at this time). -------------------------------------------- 1. Weatherseal replacement only makes sense for a door in-use 2. re-orienting the door only makes sense for a door in-use Right?
 

gathermewool

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Originally Posted by hemitom
can you move the door latch plate a little to tighten the door when you pull it closed ??
I could install a deadbolt, and try to make it so that the bolt only inserts with the door FULLY shut. With my skills, there's a 50/50 chance that won't seal the door sufficiently for my needs (i.e.,. never to be used, max seal)
 
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May only need one 2x4 down the middle of the door add some insulation then drywall then paint. You may have to replace all the siding to make it look right tho.
 
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Maybe something like a caulking backer rod would work? Closed cell foam tubes, come in a variety of sizes. Easy to stuff in there. jeff
 
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You can actually buy weatherstripping and door seals that will help, along with making adjustments to the door. If you really don't use the door at all, you can also get some peel & seal caulking along with some backer rod (1/2 inch gap is huge). The peel & seal caulking has the advantage of working like regular caulk, but also peels right off if you ever want to use (or remove) the door.
 
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Is there any chance the doorway is needed to meet building code? If so, the building inspection during re-sale might get interesting.
 

AZjeff

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Originally Posted by RayCJ
Is there any chance the doorway is needed to meet building code? If so, the building inspection during re-sale might get interesting.
With that sliding door nearby likely not. I had great success on some old windows with a kit from Home Depot (or wherever) that was double stick tape and heat shrink plastic. I'd get something to stuff in the crack around the door, take the inside knob off, install the plastic and forget about it until it's time to update. Like this
 
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One silicone sealant cartridge will take care of this. You can purchase a cartridge and gun for under $10. Also, this would be a very newb-friendly project.
 
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gathermewool

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I'm going through some rough times and need to conserve money until things get back to normal. The door is steel, if that makes any difference 1. Removing door: I've got a guy I know who may be able to teach me how to remove the door, frame it and add a window there for cheap, but I'd rather the CHEAPEST POSSIBLE OPTION for now. My plan was to get rid of the door and add a window when the rest of the windows are due some time in the future, so they all match. 2. Caulk: I've got a bunch of 3/8" closed-cell tubing that I use for the window A/C units. I could stuff some in there, but the gaps are so disparate that it wouldn't work all the way around the door. Would it make sense to get varying sizes of the tubing, stuff the crap out of every bit of it and then top with caulk? What kind of caulk? I've got a tube left of clear silicone from when I did redid the moldy bathroom caulking
Originally Posted by oldhp
Open it, chalk it really good, shut it, put 2 drywall screws to hold it tight. Smooth the chalk out. Fuhgedaboudit........
Did you mean caulk? If not, can you explain a little more, please?
Originally Posted by AZjeff
Originally Posted by RayCJ
Is there any chance the doorway is needed to meet building code? If so, the building inspection during re-sale might get interesting.
With that sliding door nearby likely not. I had great success on some old windows with a kit from Home Depot (or wherever) that was double stick tape and heat shrink plastic. I'd get something to stuff in the crack around the door, take the inside knob off, install the plastic and forget about it until it's time to update. Like this
I didn't even think about whether it would affect code to remove the door. I'll remember to bring that up when/if we ever replace the door with a window. I don't mind the door looking like a door, so the knob can stay. You bring up a good point, though; I DO need to actually seal the windows with the stuff you linked to save some money on heating. Thank you for the reminder!'
Originally Posted by Miller88
I don't think those skylights are helping you too much - how are those insulated or blocked?
Both were replaced relatively recently and the blinds help immensely. They provide a lot of cheery light during the other three seasons of the year. Combined with the also-south-facing sliding door, the skylights warm up the space surprisingly well. As some of you may remember, I like to keep the spaces outside of the bedroom pretty chilly in the winter. I've seen the space go from 50F to the high 50s without turning on the heat. That's great, considering how much baseboard heating costs!!!!
 

gathermewool

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What about Great Stuff foam? It's on-sale at Walmart for $3/12oz can It would probably look like crap when it bulges out, right?
 
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