Petro-Canada DuraDrive?

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Looks great for Dex III and would probably be top notch in your P/S system. I'm just wondering why the [censored] it's spec'd for Toyota WS with a cSt @ 100 of 7.4?????? Great for the others, but not WS. Too bad we cant get Petro-Canada here in the states. Great products from the things I have heard.
 
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MGregoir

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I am looking at either DuraDrive, Red Line D6 or Amsoil ATL. I don't tow or run hard, and the thinner fluid is more stable plus has better cold flow than the D4 or ATF. My transmission was back-specced for D-VI and there is nothing wrong with it (knock on wood) so I will change the fluid before there is a problem.
 
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DuraDrive says it has VHVI basestock, meaning that it uses a Group 3 base oil. Amsoil ATL is Group 4 mostly Redline D6 is Group 5 mostly Amsoil and Redline will outlast DuraDrive.
 
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I have not yet used the ATL but the RL D6 has been awesome thus far in my transmission. I have been using RL transmission fluids for a long time and have always preffered them.
 
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Hi folks, I had to join this discussion because I have some experience in the lubricants world (having working in R&D and sales for a major lubricants manufacturer). I just want to clear up a few concerns raised here the best I can. Toyota's WS vs T-IV - Toyota (see link to Service Bulletin < http://www.etimago.com/yaris/TSB/TS-TC01...20Fluid%20).pdf >) does clearly indicate that THEIR own ATF-WS is NOT compatible with T-IV or Dexron ATF and they recommend only the WS be used in vehicles that call for it. It makes perfect sense that they are not compatible because the additive chemistry is different. This is the same reason you should never add "magic" additives to ATF's to convert one to meet another spec - leave the chemistry work to the reputable ATF manufacturers since they spend enormous amounts of money in engineering and testing of their products. - It is also true that the viscosity is very different, WS is a fair bit lighter viscosity. The Japanese are big into fuel efficiency and so the WS is designed with a lower viscosity which tends to result in a gain more fuel economy and it is also designing with a different additive cocktail to be a longer life fluid (similar benefits to GM's Dexron VI). - Why they have not backspec'd the WS for T-IV applications is interesting but I think this is simply to avoid potential confusion especially seeing as the 2 fluids are not compatible - it is easy to see the possibility of dealer filling/top up mistakes. So to use a "multi-vehicle" ATF (from a reputable company - ideally one that is known to make ATF's) with a slightly higher viscosity, the only real trade off will be fuel efficiency. Fuel Efficiency gains from lower viscosity ENGINE oils is proven with standardized tests but it which is much more difficult to quantify such savings between different viscosities of ATF's as there are so many other variables. If you make a switch to a different product and you experience undesirable "shifting" issues, then you might consider changing it back to the OEM product but I can assure you this is highly uunlikely if you use a reputable brand product. More of a concern is ensuring the old fluid is removed before adding a different one. Early, Petro-Canada's DuraDrive MV (Multi-Vehicle) product was mentioned and there were concerns of it working in both T-IV and WS applications. Believe me, a major ATF player like Petro-Canada would not put their name on a product unless it was fully tested. Petro-Canada is a major world supplier of many different ATF's - most notably Dexron VI (they co-developed the product with GM and provide factory fill throughout the world)< http://www.imakenews.com/lng/e_article000384801.cfm?x=b11,0,w >. Another thing to keep in mind, those oil company's that supply the big automotive OEM's have to be very careful when marketing a "multi-vehicle" product because they are also licensed to make specific OEM labelled products. It is possible that their "multi-vehicle" product meets other spec's but they cannot show it because they risk losing their licensing of "specific" products. The ATF world is becoming very complicated as new designs of transmissions are developed. It is even more complicated because classic universal oils such as the old Dexron III/Mercon have been replaced with OEM specific products. The OEM's make a lot of their money on parts and lubricants are treated as a part so it is in their interest to market and protect their own labeled products.
 
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The base oil comparison is a mood point - you need to consider the full package. I am not saying that Amsoil or Redline do not make good products but it is possible that an ATF made from the best PAO oil in the world may not be well formulated. Transmission fluids contain the highest percentage of additives and are the most complex to formulate of any lubricant - the right chemical combination of a high quality additive package with a high quality base oil is critical. Petro-Canada is a global supplier of ATF's to OEM's - they would not put their name on a product unless it was a top quality product. But if we are to talk just base oils, one who has actually done comparison testing of high quality Group III+ (VHVI) base oils versus the equivalent viscosity PAO would be suprised at the marginal difference. PAO for high viscosity lubricants, absolutely PAO owns this space (high viscosity Group III do not exist or even if they do exist, they are extremely difficult to manufacture), but for low viscosity (such as those used in ATF's), the difference is marginal. So for a marginal difference, it is tough to justify paying a premium for a PAO only because it costs more to manufacture. At the end of the day, both Group III (VHVI) and PAO are "synthesized" materials (not naturally occurring) with dramatically better properties for automotive (& industrial) lubricant applications which sets them far apart from classic "conventional" base oils.
 
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Originally Posted By: AzFireGuy79
Looks great for Dex III and would probably be top notch in your P/S system. I'm just wondering why the [censored] it's spec'd for Toyota WS with a cSt @ 100 of 7.4?????? Great for the others, but not WS. Too bad we cant get Petro-Canada here in the states. Great products from the things I have heard.
Hey AzFireGuy79, Petro-Canada markets their lubricants in the USA under Petro-Canada America and have numerous distributors across the USA. For Arizona, the distributor is Pioneer Distributing, 1300 N 24th Ave, Phoenix AZ, 602 278-2693 or visit their website for more info at < http://www.pioneerdistributing.com/products.htm >
 
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