Pennzoil Platinum 5W-30 TDS

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I’m really not agreeing or disagreeing, just trying to understand why people think that about Pennzoil. I use it often and have no issues, but I am not cornered to any one brand either.

I have asked others who state similar about Pennzoil, and nobody will provide any sort of answer. Its like a myth began, and folks ran with it. Happens a lot, unfortunately.
I personally don’t think Pennzoil was cheapened. I have used PYB 10w30, 10w40 (clearance from family dollar) and PP 10w30 HM. I LIKE THAT THEY ARE USING SOME GTL basestock. Never a issue using either oil
 
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I see what you are saying, maybe I should have worded it different, I once thought Pennzoil Platinum and Pennzoil Ultra were the best oils out there. Then I read what I read here, and I was turned onto a different oil and I like that oil better.

drtyler, 1 thing we must all do is be open minded, this Forum is here to discuss everything about motor oils and sometimes we do not agree on things here.
Truth be told folks think that because it seems thin there’s no cling factor to parts. Grab some latex gloves dip a finger tip and rub between fingers. Next wipe of once. Notice the film. Mind you factors come in to play of additives that over time build a layer on metal parts.
Thicker oil helps protect in cheap additive packages. But also makes engines work harder.
Sure I rather have protection over mileage. But too thick can create issues to parts that need lubrication. If you’ve ever seen a crank bearing with to thick oil it can actually go dry in some cases.
 
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Thicker oil helps protect in cheap additive packages. But also makes engines work harder.
Sure I rather have protection over mileage. But too thick can create issues to parts that need lubrication. If you’ve ever seen a crank bearing with to thick oil it can actually go dry in some cases.
What parts won’t get lubrication with a thicker oil?
 
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I’m really not agreeing or disagreeing, just trying to understand why people think that about Pennzoil. I use it often and have no issues, but I am not cornered to any one brand either.

I have asked others who state similar about Pennzoil, and nobody will provide any sort of answer. Its like a myth began, and folks ran with it. Happens a lot, unfortunately.
I use it without hesitation, and have a long maintenance history with no issues, and several UOAs if you care to look at those. As stated above, HTHS is more important than KV, and a 30wt oil is a 30wt oil.

The purpose of a UOA is to see if the oil is still performing in spec, and if you have a fuel diluter I would always start with a short or factory OCI, sample it, and go from there. I ran PUP 5w20 out to 17k in my ‘11 Fusion and it had started to thicken a little, even though TBN was good. I’d then roll the OCI back to 15k and motor on happily.
 
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What parts won’t get lubrication with a thicker oil?
Too* thick of an oil. You ever seen a jeep in bumper high water. Your actually sopost to keep a certain speed to where you create a wake that pushes vs coming over the hood. That same affect happens to bearings an the oil ports on your crank. Now certain engines have a viscosity range based on temp. Offering from 5w30-10w50 an some engines have a set viscosity.
Subarus have a big enough crank ports to have that range. Toyotas require a 0w20 do not.
Again too thick of an oil can be bad for bearings.
 
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I use it without hesitation, and have a long maintenance history with no issues, and several UOAs if you care to look at those. As stated above, HTHS is more important than KV, and a 30wt oil is a 30wt oil.

The purpose of a UOA is to see if the oil is still performing in spec, and if you have a fuel diluter I would always start with a short or factory OCI, sample it, and go from there. I ran PUP 5w20 out to 17k in my ‘11 Fusion and it had started to thicken a little, even though TBN was good. I’d then roll the OCI back to 15k and motor on happily.
That’s usually due to evaporation but at that mileage and heat cycles is about normal. Wonderful thing about viscosity is it can go up or down based on conditions. Fuel dilution or no dilution. All depends really. If I stretch an OCI that will happen. If I’m early no real affect. Driving conditions as a factor.
 
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Too* thick of an oil. You ever seen a jeep in bumper high water. Your actually sopost to keep a certain speed to where you create a wake that pushes vs coming over the hood. That same affect happens to bearings an the oil ports on your crank. Now certain engines have a viscosity range based on temp. Offering from 5w30-10w50 an some engines have a set viscosity.
Subarus have a big enough crank ports to have that range. Toyotas require a 0w20 do not.
Again too thick of an oil can be bad for bearings.
The Toyota engine does not require a grade, that's just silly. No engine requires a grade other than requiring one that provides sufficient film thickness to prevent damage.

No SAE grade is going to be too thick to be "bad for bearings" unless the winter rating is so inappropriate for the starting temperature that the oil cannot be pumped. If that were the case then every engine in Australia or the Middle East would be destroyed in short order. Or every engine that is started at any temperature other than normal operating temperature.

There is such imagination sometimes about lubrication in engines.
 

ZeeOSix

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Too* thick of an oil. You ever seen a jeep in bumper high water. Your actually sopost to keep a certain speed to where you create a wake that pushes vs coming over the hood. That same affect happens to bearings an the oil ports on your crank. Now certain engines have a viscosity range based on temp. Offering from 5w30-10w50 an some engines have a set viscosity.
Subarus have a big enough crank ports to have that range. Toyotas require a 0w20 do not.
Again too thick of an oil can be bad for bearings.
You realize that motor oil when cold is 100s of times thicker than oil at 100C, yet those force fed lubricated bearings don't self destruct or get damaged from oil that thick. The Jeep analogy driving in water isn't relative in any way with journal bearing lubrication.
 

ZeeOSix

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Wonderful thing about viscosity is it can go up or down based on conditions. Fuel dilution or no dilution. All depends really.
Yeah, it goes down with increased heat, which means using a thinner oil (or having badly diluted oil) for more demanding engine use gives less MOFT between moving parts and less wear protection.
 
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The Pennzoil Platinum 5W30 SP / GF-6 synthetic oil appears to be a good oil formulation for GDI engines (10W30 version may even be better - unless you live in North Dakota winters) .
 
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The Pennzoil Platinum 5W30 SP / GF-6 synthetic oil appears to be a good oil formulation for GDI engines (10W30 version may even be better - unless you live in North Dakota winters) .
I use the 10w30 as it’s cheaper by 2-4 dollars before and after taxes. Formulation is still very great. And here in Florida once heated it thins out anyways. I wish they sold a 40 weight to public but don’t understand why not. Even if it’s GTL base stock. Shouldn’t be hard to produce or make public.
How much cleaner does the high mileage platinum clean vs regular platinum or ultra platinum is my question. I’m not too worried about seal swellers as every other change with another platinum should be fine when looking to clean up things.
 
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PP, M1, Castrol, Valv, QS etc all make great motor oils. Like many have said HTHS is the "main factor". Hell, even Supertech and Kirkland have some good oils (Warred distribution I believe). Nothing lasts forever, you can baby your car with the best fluids in the world and then one day, while you are out enjoying your car, some idiot ends up crashing into you. Where are your fluids now?

Bottom line is, if it is in the grade required or a bump above, you are good to go. I prefer a HTHS rating of 3.5 or above, since it helps me sleep better at night and I could care less if 1 - 2 MPG are cut off my hunt for fuel efficiency.
 
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You may wish to instead use Penzoil Platinum Full Synthetic High Mileage 5W-30 oil. It has a viscosity @ 100C of 11.4.
It will treat your oil seals as well to keep them healthy which stops internal oil burning and external oil leaks.

Unfortunately Penzoil doesn't list HTHS on their stats website.
I am hoping that a viscosity @100C of 11.4 implies a HTHS of at least 3.2.

I personality never use any oil with a HTHS < 3.0, so I'll never use a 20 weight oil or lower viscosity
regardless of what the CAFE inflenced owners manual says.
Car makers care more about avoiding CAFE fines, than about your engine's longevity.

In my opinion, following the oil viscosity and oil change interval recommendation in your owners manual
is the best way to shorten the life of your engine.
 
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The proof that the oil hasn't been cheapened can and will be found at the cash register. The data will be found on your receipt.
I think the big oil companies are celebrating with the advent of 0W-16 and 0W-8. It allows them to put less petroleum into each quart of oil and make bigger profits. The movement to thinner fluids seems similar to a fast food restaurant watering down the soft drinks or a bar wattering down the beer from a tap. More profits for the seller, lower quality for the product.
 
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I think the big oil companies are celebrating with the advent of 0W-16 and 0W-8. It allows them to put less petroleum into each quart of oil and make bigger profits. The movement to thinner fluids seems similar to a fast food restaurant watering down the soft drinks or a bar wattering down the beer from a tap. More profits for the seller, lower quality for the product.
Haha wut???

That actually did make me laugh.
 

4WD

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I think the big oil companies are celebrating with the advent of 0W-16 and 0W-8. It allows them to put less petroleum into each quart of oil and make bigger profits. The movement to thinner fluids seems similar to a fast food restaurant watering down the soft drinks or a bar wattering down the beer from a tap. More profits for the seller, lower quality for the product.
Right - because at 0W16 - one can use more carbonated water instead of 60-70% GTL etc …
 
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I think the big oil companies are celebrating with the advent of 0W-16 and 0W-8. It allows them to put less petroleum into each quart of oil and make bigger profits. The movement to thinner fluids seems similar to a fast food restaurant watering down the soft drinks or a bar wattering down the beer from a tap. More profits for the seller, lower quality for the product.

Haha wut???

That actually did make me laugh.

I thought maybe I was reading things wrong since I hadn't had my coffee yet this morning. Just revisited it. Nope, I read it right... now I'm just disappointed.
 
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