PEA question

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530
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NC
So we know that Techron has been a useful tool regarding fuel level sending units, freeing up whatever is stuck and allowing the guage to read correctly. My question is this: Does PEA work its cleaning when sitting in the tank without the presence of heat/compression/combustion? Would pouring Regane or Techron on a carboned up engine part and letting it sit clean it?
 
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WatUpDoc
^I don't believe PEA is a solvent, more like a detergent, so probably more helpful during operation than sitting? I'd use Kreen as a piston soak or as an interval parts cleaner, on a non-severely sludged up engine mind you(otherwise manual cleaning to follow is generally more advisable), but I may be off base. Otherwise, I'd venture to say for carbon treatment using Kreen would help. That or a top-end cleaner. Now, about carbon deposits on the valves, etc? Something like Techron, Redline SI-1, Amsoil Pi and the like are all solid. Gumout REGANE is popular as well. I doubt it can do much just sitting in the gas tank, though.
 
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2,434
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Oconomowoc Wi
BG 44K has worked for me as recently as last week... It really does clean things up. Redline is the other one that I have used in a few other cars. BG does say that 44K works better if it sits in a tank for a week or so. It must somehow loosen up deposits, etc... I am assuming that gas or vapors settle in the injectors, cylinders, etc while the car sits.
 
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2,081
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Los Angeles, California
Originally Posted By: hisilver
So we know that Techron has been a useful tool regarding fuel level sending units, freeing up whatever is stuck and allowing the guage to read correctly. My question is this: Does PEA work its cleaning when sitting in the tank without the presence of heat/compression/combustion? Would pouring Regane or Techron on a carboned up engine part and letting it sit clean it?
hisilver, I read an auto article long ago about additives and they stated that part of the cleaning process involves allowing the detergent/PEA/solvent to sit in the tank. This is especiall true when cleaning valves and such. To toss it in your tank and drive it to empty doesn't help as much. This is why I wondered so much about buying low grade gasoline and putting a bottle of Techron or such to bring the PEA levels up to Top Tier grade gas. On another forum I was told it can't be done so that blows my theory. Durango
 
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1,478
Location
Iowa
Originally Posted By: hisilver
Would pouring Regane or Techron on a carboned up engine part and letting it sit clean it?
I used Techron Fuel System Cleaner to submerge old fuel injectors in for an over night soak. It didn't fully dissolve the baked on varnish on the exterior tips of the injectors, but softened it to the point that it was very easy to gently wipe away with a q-tip. These were deposits that carburetor cleaner and scrubbing had no effect on.
 
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I have tried many of the cleaners in question by dunking spark plug in them for days but I have yet to find anything which will make them clean.
 
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2,435
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Mizzou-land
Give EasyOff oven cleaner a try on your plugs. You may be surprised. Keep in mind that is primarily NaOH - so be careful with your skin.
 
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26,146
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Quote:
BG does say that 44K works better if it sits in a tank for a week or so. It must somehow loosen up deposits, etc... I am assuming that gas or vapors settle in the injectors, cylinders, etc while the car sits.
That seems to be the case with all cleaners, the longer it can sit in the injectors the better. Short hop cars that take a weeks to go through the tank of fuel probably benefit more from these products more than the car that gets a bottle added and run on the highway for the whole tank.
Originally Posted By: samilcar
I used Techron Fuel System Cleaner to submerge old fuel injectors in for an over night soak. It didn't fully dissolve the baked on varnish on the exterior tips of the injectors, but softened it to the point that it was very easy to gently wipe away with a q-tip. These were deposits that carburetor cleaner and scrubbing had no effect on.
That works sometimes but there could be a few problems with doing it that way. There are small filters in the injectors themselves, once the stuff is loosened in the injector it needs to be blown back out for the injector or it can get trapped between the needle and seat. The only way this can be done is with the filter out and applying constant pressure backwards while triggering the injector. The stuff i use in my machine eats carbon, rust, paint and varnish in minutes but its not an OTC product and does not mix well with fuel or other chemicals. It is used in a heated 1kw ultrasonic tank then the injector goes in another ultrasonic tank to flush the chemical out.
 
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Here is a question for everyone:- 1) One cleaner says don't leave it in the tank for more than a week. Please use it up within a week otherwise bad thing will happen to your fuel system 2) Another cleaner says to keep it in the tank for at least a week. Which one would your preference and why? Similarly, which cleaner would be the stronger? - Vikas
 
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26,146
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
I think PEA based stuff is fine long term, in fact Redline claims its fine for continuous use. With something like Chemtool i might be a bit cautious with long term in an older system. Modern fuel system seals and components are very resistant to solvents and chemicals and given the dilution rate i wouldn't be to concerned.
 
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For some reason the current Redline bottle no longer has continuous usage listed on it. On the other hand it also does not mention anything about how long or short it should stay in the fuel system.
 
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26,146
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MA, Mittelfranken.de
Quote:
So even the plastic 'sock' filters on in-tank fuel pumps are safe from everything save for a tankful of pure tolulene, acetone, or the like??
I see some of these over 20 yrs old and look like the day were put in, its really rare to find one damaged or plugged. The material seems to be resistant to almost everything except high heat.
Originally Posted By: vikas
For some reason the current Redline bottle no longer has continuous usage listed on it. On the other hand it also does not mention anything about how long or short it should stay in the fuel system.
Their website still has it listed for continuous use and it appears to be the latest bottle. I have been using continuously it in my snowblower since day one, the fuel is in with stabil and SI-1 all year, it uses regular fuel hose and has a carb. Last year the hose rubbed on a cover and i had to change it, it show no signs of internal degradation whatsoever. http://www.redlineoil.com/product.aspx?pid=80&pcid=12
Originally Posted By: itslimjim
You know, I wonder if it'd be worth it to replace the 'in-tank' sock at the fuel pump this old Civic I have?
Probably not but you can test pressure and flow if your concerned about it. Unlike regular fuel filters these do not trap and hold particles very well, they just stop it from entering the system. When the pump stops or new fuel is added any particles tend to fall away from it and settles in the bottom of the tank at some point.
 
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WatUpDoc
Originally Posted By: Trav
Originally Posted By: itslimjim
You know, I wonder if it'd be worth it to replace the 'in-tank' sock at the fuel pump this old Civic I have?
Probably not but you can test pressure and flow if your concerned about it. Unlike regular fuel filters these do not trap and hold particles very well, they just stop it from entering the system. When the pump stops or new fuel is added any particles tend to fall away from it and settles in the bottom of the tank at some point.
^Ah, I see. I suspect it's mainly to keep the line free are larger particles and non-entry into the pump itself. The downstream fuel filter in the car has been replaced twice since I've owned the vehicle. Since I changed it a 2nd time though, I did have the run with RL SI-1( a full bottle) only to pull my new spark plugs 2,000 miles later and see the strange discoloration. The verdict is still out whether it was the Red Line or the MMO. IMO, it was the Red Line. Those plugs only saw 3 ounces per 10 gallons of MMO, but a 15 ounce bottle of SI-1 probably shocked the fuel system enough to foul(or perhaps it was only cosmetic? shrug) even these new plugs...but that's another story.
 
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Seattle, WA
PEA detergent is DESIGNED to work with heat of the engine and combustion chamber, so while it will work just by soaking, it works even better with the usage of heat during combustion.
 
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11,656
Location
NorthEast
Originally Posted By: GMorg
Give EasyOff oven cleaner a try on your plugs. You may be surprised. Keep in mind that is primarily NaOH - so be careful with your skin.
I tried the blue one (made for self-cleaning oven); did NOT take off the carbon from the spark plug but did leave its residue which needed to be cleaned off. I suspect you meant the other type oven cleaner.
 
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2,435
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Mizzou-land
Yes, I was talking about the product that is mainly sodium hydroxide and detergent. Again, don't get it on your skin or anything else that you may contact later.
 
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