Offered a job

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Hey all. So I graduated last month and have been searching for a job where I worked as an intern for a year. They offered me a job today, but the money offered was a little lower than I was hoping/expecting. Now, I know that it is acceptable policy to negotiate pay in this company, but I'm unsure of how to go about negotiating without risking losing the job offer. How would you negotiate an increased salary before accepting the job? Start higher than you are expecting and negotiate down, or just throw out the desired salary and hope they take it? Here's some useful information: - It is a large company (100k+ employees) - They have pay scales based upon job level (desired salary is within the pay scale of the offered salary) Thanks!
 
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I graduated in December, got my job offer in Novemberand officially started last week Congrats! Btw. If you KNOW you are worth more and the position is worth more, that gives you grounds to negotiate. You could leverage your experience already working with them as an intern. If you could find starting salaries in the SAME area for a higher price, you could leverage that. My offer was right with market demand. My advice is: if you don't have other offers lined up, I wouldn't negotiate unless they are severely underpaying for your experience or job position. This is your first job, I don't think you have enough leverage to really negotiate, especially if there offer isnt that much lower. In my opinion. Jobs are in high demand and I wouldn't want you to keep searching for a job because they declined your offer, remember how stressful the application process is. All in all, you should feel good that you have a job in times like these, but I'm assuming their offer isn't THAT low. Good luck!
 
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JustN89

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Originally Posted By: JeepWJ19
I graduated in December, got my job offer in Novemberand officially started last week Congrats! Btw. If you KNOW you are worth more and the position is worth more, that gives you grounds to negotiate. You could leverage your experience already working with them as an intern. If you could find starting salaries in the SAME area for a higher price, you could leverage that. My offer was right with market demand. My advice is: if you don't have other offers lined up, I wouldn't negotiate unless they are severely underpaying for your experience or job position. This is your first job, I don't think you have enough leverage to really negotiate, especially if there offer isnt that much lower. In my opinion. Jobs are in high demand and I wouldn't want you to keep searching for a job because they declined your offer, remember how stressful the application process is. All in all, you should feel good that you have a job in times like these, but I'm assuming their offer isn't THAT low. Good luck!
Thank you!
 
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I'm old school, prove your worth then get the big bucks. As long as the offer isn't an insult I'd jump on it. Once you prove your worth and get contacts at other companies then you can turn the screws.
 
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Keep it fact based. You desire a higher salary, but that’s not a fact that gets you there. If you have another higher offer, then you have something compelling. If you have market data that shows the offer is below market, that would also be compelling.
 
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It's your first job offer with a large company...take it, work hard and have a good attitude. Raises will come and if not, the economy is just starting to heat up. In a couple of years there will be other opportunities for you. Remember, it's always easier to get a job when you have one.
 
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Also, depends on your area and field, if you think they won't be able to find a talent like yours quickly - I would negotiate, otherwise I'll just start, learn and keep my options open. Congrats and good luck thumbsup
 
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there is nothing wrong with saying that you are really interested; can they do a little better on the salary. (don't get greedy) and be prepared how you will respond if they don't raise their offer. at this point it would be best, once you talk, to make your decision on the spot; you have already "taken some time".
 
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Since when can interns negotiate a higher salary? What work experience do you have to justify asking for more money? Your best bet is to have competing offers from different employers (hopefully ones that compete with one another in industry) if you want a bump.
 
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So I have 40+ years in corp America working in IT for insurance/financial and IBM. You could lightly ask if there is any flexibility in the starting salary but don't push too hard. Many companies give a yearly bonus based upon your appraisal rating and company results. Add that to salary to get to total compensation. Read Glassdoor.com about your company. Create an account to get the most info. On the outside there are many things about company salary policy you don't know right now. Typically each job has a job grade and for that job grade there is a minimum and maximum salary and a median salary. You get good raises easily to bring you up to median but smaller raises when you are above median. Once close to the maximum it's almost impossible to get a raise. Most large companies participate in salary surveys with other similar companies. Hopefully as you approach median you get promoted to the next job grade and are then below median for that job grade. At some point you get up high in the salary range for the top job grade in your specific specialty. Then the raises only come when they raise the minimum and maximum based upon salary surveys and other company policies.
 
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Originally Posted By: Reddy45
Since when can interns negotiate a higher salary? What work experience do you have to justify asking for more money? Your best bet is to have competing offers from different employers (hopefully ones that compete with one another in industry) if you want a bump.
It depends. 1. Being an intern they already know the system and there's less to learn which means less time in training and on-boarding. 2. Already has built relationships with team members, and it appears they've been favorable enough to get an extended offer 3. Some internships do have quality work. We often hear how a lot of internships are essentially meaningless jobs (coffee guy, pencil sharpener etc). But if their internship was meaningful, that is a measurable experience, even if it was only for a couple months.
 
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When you negotiate and they balk ask then if they can put it in an offer letter that if you meet certain expectations you'll get the higher target in six months. Sometimes the guy who'll pull the trigger on you only has to fill a position now... the merit raises are someone else's problem. laugh
 
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You've worked there they know your work history if they really want you they'll pay more or they can get a bargain on another employee they know squat about!
 
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Originally Posted By: RedOakRanch
I'm old school, prove your worth then get the big bucks.
If only that's how it worked. These days company loyalty is not what it used to be. My first job I took what they offered, worked extremely hard, took on a lot more responsibilities, and never got anywhere. At every review they claimed I was doing an outstanding job but nobody was getting raises. Only when I put in my notice was I offered more pay but it was too late, I had another job lined up already. There are only a few times in your life where you can significantly increase your salary. Starting out a new job is a good time to negotiate. You have a few things working in your favor: 1. They know you and your work ethic, otherwise they wouldn't be offering you the job 2. You know the company, their policies, and expectations 3. With your internship they have already "invested" in training you somewhat, depending on how in depth your internship was Negotiating is an art. Don't do it in a "take it or leave it" way, because then they will retract the offer and tell you to kick rocks. Tell them you appreciate their offer and that you are sincerely interested in the position. Tell them you feel you would be a great fit, and have a lot of good qualities (now would be a good time to throw those on the table) that you feel would help the company grow. Make them feel like they are getting a worthwhile investment for their money. Then say "it would really help me out and solidify my decision to work with this company if I could make X amount per year", or something to that effect. Also make sure it is reasonable. If they offer you 40,000 ask for 50,000 or whatever would be in the acceptable range for your pay level. While you have more of an inside advantage to them being an intern than some guy off the street who would be considered an unknown quantity, you also have to be realistic. If you demand 60k or 70k they will say sorry we can't do anything for you. If you are polite and professional in your negotiation, the worst they can say is the offer stands and that is all we can give you. If they really like you and want to make you happy, they will try to meet you in the middle or maybe give you a little more.
 
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Originally Posted By: Reddy45
Your best bet is to have competing offers from different employers (hopefully ones that compete with one another in industry) if you want a bump.
I would NOT do this unless you already work there and are entertaining the possibility of leaving. I have family members that have hired many people, are directors, work in HR, etc. They all have told me never to do this. The negotiation is between you and your potential employer. I had a friend who did this and the hiring manager said "good, go work for that company then", and the offer was retracted. Competition is very high these days. If an employer selects you for a position, there is usually a reason behind it, and they will likely be open to the idea of slightly increasing their pay to get what they want. Being realistic is key, obviously. The hiring manager also does not want to hire someone knowing that on a whim they could jump ship after investing money in that person for training and have them go somewhere else. As someone else posted, make your decision AT THE MEETING. If you take a lot of time to think about things after they make you an offer, it might pass you by.
 
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Quote:
The negotiation is between you and your potential employer. I had a friend who did this and the hiring manager said "good, go work for that company then", and the offer was retracted. Competition is very high these days.
Yep, never try a bluff cause boss can pull their offer on the spot. JustN89, What type of career field did you intern at ?
 
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you better be prepared to know your answer and your number. If they ask you what do you want you better have what you want ready and if they agree to that number you better say yes. It is bad for your reputation to negotiate just for negotiations sake. Or to declare what you want but then say you need more time. If it is a pure increase of base and you say something like I need to talk to my dad about this, then be prepared for them to pull both offers completely. I would do this as a hiring manager as it shows lack of decision making and just game playing and obv you cant even function without your dad. Only if they're structuring a complex comp package where the total present day comp value can't be determined, can you say I need to review the new offer without losing credibility. Watch a few episodes of shark tank and how negotiation happens. Look at how bad things turn out when they are indecisive or play games.
 
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If you don't ask you don't get. I see no harm in indicating your enthusiastic interest for the position and asking, "is this the best offer you can do?" Not sure what your other perks are, maybe those can be negotiated other than money. Parking, vacation, massages, etc. End of the day this is your first gig, be prideful but not greedy, your employer will respect you for it. Congrats and best of luck!
 
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Disagree that employers will respect the gameplay. Totally sets a bad tone that you only care about the money and not the interest in the job or opportunity, and that immediately you are saying you feel you are not a good fit to their offer. Agree that you should pivot instead to what t are the growth opportunities.
 
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