NGK Ruthenium Spark Plugs

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Originally Posted by The_Nuke
Originally Posted by Dave_Mark
I know a person who purchased spark plugs from an AutoZone. The spark plugs were returned by a previous customer but were "new." The previous customer actually painted some old spark plugs from a different vehicle silver and stuck them in the box. This person who purchased the "new" spark plugs ended up destroying their engine. The plugs were too long.
Why did the person use the silver-painted plugs in his engine instead of returning them for actual new plugs?
Probably because the next person probably thought he bought new plugs
 
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Originally Posted by Dave_Mark
Originally Posted by The_Nuke
Originally Posted by Dave_Mark
I know a person who purchased spark plugs from an AutoZone. The spark plugs were returned by a previous customer but were "new." The previous customer actually painted some old spark plugs from a different vehicle silver and stuck them in the box. This person who purchased the "new" spark plugs ended up destroying their engine. The plugs were too long.
Why did the person use the silver-painted plugs in his engine instead of returning them for actual new plugs?
They were painted pretty well and all the plugs purchased were painted, so none of them really stuck out. What can you say: weekend mechanic slaps something into his car without much thought. A "real" mechanic might have noticed the slightly dull silver finish instead of shiny nickel plating.
A "real" weekend mechanic would have compared new to old and caught the different length. I've NEVER "slapped" new plugs into a vehicle, even as a teenager. How do you know the parts guy gave you the right parts? Everyone is capable of making mistakes, even the people who work in factories and pack the boxes.
 
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I just did the plugs on our GS 350, which should be the same or similar engine. 72k miles on it. The original 3 electrode (not really, it's weird) denso came out and I installed the exact same back in. Denso was $8.99 per and rutheniums were $19. Observations: the old plugs had wildly varying gaps. Some looked nearly new and others were 2-3 times the gap. I've never seen iridiums worm as much as these were at 70k. What's going on in these 3.5s? The idle was immediately smoother and acceleration also seemed a little less rowdy. I really don't understand the denso design. There are three anodes (cathode is center) but only one has the tiny gap along with the iridium pellet. It, like a standard plug, is in line with the axis of the anode. The other 2 are off to the side, kind of like the multi-electrode bosch designs, except they are far away and don't have any iridium pellets on them. It is very weird and I don't see how they do anything. There was no wear on the ones that came out. I hope mine gets an uptick in mileage- we bought this as a 3rd car but it gets worse mpg that my f150, except on the interstate. Sort of silly to drive the truck for better mpg. It is, however, a beautiful and highly refined vehicle to drive. M
 
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Originally Posted by Ihatetochangeoil
Originally Posted by Dave_Mark
Originally Posted by The_Nuke
Originally Posted by Dave_Mark
I know a person who purchased spark plugs from an AutoZone. The spark plugs were returned by a previous customer but were "new." The previous customer actually painted some old spark plugs from a different vehicle silver and stuck them in the box. This person who purchased the "new" spark plugs ended up destroying their engine. The plugs were too long.
Why did the person use the silver-painted plugs in his engine instead of returning them for actual new plugs?
They were painted pretty well and all the plugs purchased were painted, so none of them really stuck out. What can you say: weekend mechanic slaps something into his car without much thought. A "real" mechanic might have noticed the slightly dull silver finish instead of shiny nickel plating.
A "real" weekend mechanic would have compared new to old and caught the different length. I've NEVER "slapped" new plugs into a vehicle, even as a teenager. How do you know the parts guy gave you the right parts? Everyone is capable of making mistakes, even the people who work in factories and pack the boxes.
That is a great point ^^^^^^ Always compare "new" to old parts... You just never know what happened prior to you getting the parts.
 
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My Tacoma uses copper denso or ngk plugs. 30K intervals. Easy to change. I stick to manufactures recommendations. Don’t try to reinvent the wheel when it comes to plugs.
 
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Apr 7, 2010
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I'm trying to figure out what exactly makes Ruthenium better than Iridium.

Ruthenium has less density, less thermal conductivity, less corrosion resistance, a lower melting point, and higher electrical resistivity.

I'm not a chemist, but it seems like it should be less desirable than iridium as a spark plug electrode material.

What is the comparative advantage of Ru vs Ir?
 
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I'm trying to figure out what exactly makes Ruthenium better than Iridium.

Ruthenium has less density, less thermal conductivity, less corrosion resistance, a lower melting point, and higher electrical resistivity.

I'm not a chemist, but it seems like it should be less desirable than iridium as a spark plug electrode material.

What is the comparative advantage of Ru vs Ir?
Ruthenium costs less than iridium, for ngk to buy.
 
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I'm trying to figure out what exactly makes Ruthenium better than Iridium.

Ruthenium has less density, less thermal conductivity, less corrosion resistance, a lower melting point, and higher electrical resistivity.

I'm not a chemist, but it seems like it should be less desirable than iridium as a spark plug electrode material.

What is the comparative advantage of Ru vs Ir?

That may be true when looking at them in their pure form but what happens when you use it in a mix with other metals to form an alloy?
It is also interesting that they make two electrode designs, one is specifically designed for forced induction engines which is a big deal with so many smaller turbo engines being used today.

 
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