New Jersey Gun Buy Back Program

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17th century, Unknown, possibly due to resemblance of cockles to hearts.[1] Alternatively, may be corruption of Latin cochleae in cochleae cordis (“ventricles of heart”),[1] or of Irish Gaelic origin. Possibly also inspired by mollusks opening when exposed to warmth, notably cooking. ganked from wiktionary smile
Originally Posted By: NateDN10
Originally Posted By: Shannow
bubbatime, that story warms the cockles of my heart.
Not quite sure what the cockles of ones heart are, but I also agree with bubbatime's post.
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: Astro14
It's been reported that during previous buybacks, gun collectors showed up in the parking lot with lots of cash. If they saw something they liked, then offering a $50 premium (or more) over what the cops were paying got the collector the on-the-spot sale... Still accomplished what the buyback folks wanted, right? They wanted those guns "off the streets"...and now, they are off the streets, and safely kept by a law-abiding citizen....all good, right?
Interesting. Right of first purchase by the population at large, and the right folks right there to process the buy. And as mentioned,guns out of the hads of those who don't want them, who also likely contribute to the 100k guns stolen each year.
 
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Originally Posted By: eljefino
Look at prescription drug turn-in programs. The premise is if there's unused dangerous stuff in peoples' houses, it gives crooks a better chance at grabbing something useful if they break in. People get complacent about the unused cultch in their homes. If its more convenient to turn them in, more will get turned in. If a gun is (nearly) forgotten about it's not serving a home defense purpose anyway.
wrong. the prescription turn in is too keep drugs out of the water system. fail.
 
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Originally Posted By: Astro14
It's been reported that during previous buybacks, gun collectors showed up in the parking lot with lots of cash. If they saw something they liked, then offering a $50 premium (or more) over what the cops were paying got the collector the on-the-spot sale... Still accomplished what the buyback folks wanted, right? They wanted those guns "off the streets"...and now, they are off the streets, and safely kept by a law-abiding citizen....all good, right?
Exactly what my buddies did during the last Seattle buy back. Mostly junk but they got a few good things. Of course the press was all over it trying to portray the "buyers" as bad guys, but many were FFL's and all the ones I know are perfect citizens. One picture of a guy in a dark hoody has done some gunsmithing for me and lives just a few miles from me. They tried to make him appear as a criminal!
 

Astro14

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Originally Posted By: FXjohn
Originally Posted By: eljefino
Look at prescription drug turn-in programs. The premise is if there's unused dangerous stuff in peoples' houses, it gives crooks a better chance at grabbing something useful if they break in. People get complacent about the unused cultch in their homes. If its more convenient to turn them in, more will get turned in. If a gun is (nearly) forgotten about it's not serving a home defense purpose anyway.
wrong. the prescription turn in is too keep drugs out of the water system. fail.
You sure don't let the facts sway you from your rigid dogma, do you? There are many reasons for drug turn in programs, keeping them off the streets is a clearly stated goal...at least in my area.... Perhaps your area doesn't have that goal. From a press release: "The Virginia Beach Police Department will be collecting old Prescription Drugs and Over-the-Counter medications to be destroyed. This is an attempt to keep prescription drugs off of the streets, prevent juveniles from using/selling prescriptions drugs not prescribed to them, and to help keep our local waterways free of prescriptions drugs (due to use of toilets to get rid of drugs)."
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: Astro14
Originally Posted By: FXjohn
Originally Posted By: eljefino
Look at prescription drug turn-in programs. The premise is if there's unused dangerous stuff in peoples' houses, it gives crooks a better chance at grabbing something useful if they break in. People get complacent about the unused cultch in their homes. If its more convenient to turn them in, more will get turned in. If a gun is (nearly) forgotten about it's not serving a home defense purpose anyway.
wrong. the prescription turn in is too keep drugs out of the water system. fail.
You sure don't let the facts sway you from your rigid dogma, do you? There are many reasons for drug turn in programs, keeping them off the streets is a clearly stated goal...at least in my area.... Perhaps your area doesn't have that goal. From a press release: "The Virginia Beach Police Department will be collecting old Prescription Drugs and Over-the-Counter medications to be destroyed. This is an attempt to keep prescription drugs off of the streets, prevent juveniles from using/selling prescriptions drugs not prescribed to them, and to help keep our local waterways free of prescriptions drugs (due to use of toilets to get rid of drugs)."
Well, so playing Devil's advocate here, why should it be OK or practical for prescription drugs and not for guns? 2A doesnt necessarily have a play in that argument, since we as a population seem to accept that regulation, registration, third party approvals for providing, etc. is all acceptable for prescription drugs, and that it is a crime to resell them, and that misuse can also cause death or disability.
 
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Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Originally Posted By: Astro14
Originally Posted By: FXjohn
Originally Posted By: eljefino
Look at prescription drug turn-in programs. The premise is if there's unused dangerous stuff in peoples' houses, it gives crooks a better chance at grabbing something useful if they break in. People get complacent about the unused cultch in their homes. If its more convenient to turn them in, more will get turned in. If a gun is (nearly) forgotten about it's not serving a home defense purpose anyway.
wrong. the prescription turn in is too keep drugs out of the water system. fail.
You sure don't let the facts sway you from your rigid dogma, do you? There are many reasons for drug turn in programs, keeping them off the streets is a clearly stated goal...at least in my area.... Perhaps your area doesn't have that goal. From a press release: "The Virginia Beach Police Department will be collecting old Prescription Drugs and Over-the-Counter medications to be destroyed. This is an attempt to keep prescription drugs off of the streets, prevent juveniles from using/selling prescriptions drugs not prescribed to them, and to help keep our local waterways free of prescriptions drugs (due to use of toilets to get rid of drugs)."
Well, so playing Devil's advocate here, why should it be OK or practical for prescription drugs and not for guns? 2A doesnt necessarily have a play in that argument, since we as a population seem to accept that regulation, registration, third party approvals for providing, etc. is all acceptable for prescription drugs, and that it is a crime to resell them, and that misuse can also cause death or disability.
There isn't a 2nd amendment equivalent for drugs. Unfortunately the Constitution doesn't say that the right for people to use drugs shall not be infringed. So the government is happy to regulate them ad nauseam.
 

Astro14

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They key difference between the two programs is the use of taxpayer money. If you've got prescriptions that you no longer need, you should be able to turn them in for various reasons, all of which support the public good. But none of those programs are offering taxpayer money to turn in your drugs. The gun programs are buybacks; using public money to incentivize the turn in. And they generally get junk. They do not accomplish the stated purpose; getting guns off the streets. They use public money to get the rusty gun from Grandma's attic, which is a specious accomplishment.
 
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Originally Posted By: Astro14
The gun programs are buybacks; using public money to incentivize the turn in. And they generally get junk. They do not accomplish the stated purpose; getting guns off the streets. They use public money to get the rusty gun from Grandma's attic, which is a specious accomplishment.
And even if they say that they're not using appropriated funds (as in the case of NJ), it's still costing NJ residents to fund these programs. Money seized from drug dealers is still the state's money. It's still your money (NJ residents). It's money that could be applied towards other crime prevention programs that DO use appropriated funds. And it's money that was earned/generated from activities funded by appropriated money (drug busts, etc). Them claiming that they're not using taxpayer resources is a little disingenuous in my opinion.
 
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Originally Posted By: Astro14
The gun programs are buybacks; using public money to incentivize the turn in. And they generally get junk. They do not accomplish the stated purpose; getting guns off the streets. They use public money to get the rusty gun from Grandma's attic, which is a specious accomplishment.
Practically speaking though, getting rid of guns from grandma's attic must diminish the gun supply on the street a bit. Up here, if you are junior criminal just getting started, its probably quite a bit more expensive to get ahold of a handgun, as there isn't handguns available here at every home to steal. I imagine you have to come up with some real cash and you also have to deal with bigger fish than you which maybe a bigger deterrent than the police. I would assume in a lower income neighborhood in the US, any highschool kid can get ahold of a rusty old revolver easily for not a lot of money?
 
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Originally Posted By: IndyIan
Practically speaking though, getting rid of guns from grandma's attic must diminish the gun supply on the street a bit. Up here, if you are junior criminal just getting started, its probably quite a bit more expensive to get ahold of a handgun, as there isn't handguns available here at every home to steal. I imagine you have to come up with some real cash and you also have to deal with bigger fish than you which maybe a bigger deterrent than the police. I would assume in a lower income neighborhood in the US, any highschool kid can get ahold of a rusty old revolver easily for not a lot of money?
Do you know any of this or are you guessing? What we do know is that coke and meth are illegal everywhere and yet drug dealers have supplies. Guns would be no different. If there is demand they'll appear. Most common street criminals here don't have a gun and if they do it's usually a cheapo.
 
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Originally Posted By: Robenstein
Originally Posted By: BMWTurboDzl
meh ..the. country was founded by smugglers who started getting pinched by the crown and some big slave traders out of New England. The guns were for hunting.
I am a professor of American history. I can tell you that if you put down as an answer I would give you a big fat zero for points. Guns were used for hunting, but also as tools of defense against raiding parties on the frontier. The British crown did not like to invest in the defense of the colonists for the great part of colonial American history. They only did so when they had to because it was INSANELY expensive. This is evident because the French and Indian War/Seven Years War about bankrupted the British and they instituted all of those harsh economic measures in the colonies to make them pay back the motherland for their efforts in the earlier war. Those new and harsh policies made some people turn to a black market, but not all. [/quote] This isn't a classroom but a forum. I was being a little over the top trying to make a point that the Revolution over "the right to bear arms".
 
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Originally Posted By: BMWTurboDzl
I am a professor of American history.
Does that establish objectivity in this regard? smile
 
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There is no such thing as pure objectivity. By simply discussing or researching a subject you are already being biased by saying this subject is more deserving of my attention and time right now than others. And no, not a classroom but if one is going to argue a point and present evidence, it should be accurate.
 
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