Key doesn't lock/unlock door

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Got a '12 Civic that has keys (2) that can't lock or unlock the driver's door. I don't recall off-hand, but you turn the key right to lock and left to unlock or vis-versa but nothing happens. The key fits, turns, etc, etc, the key fob locks and unlocks, the interior switch locks and unlocks. With (2) different keys doing this, it's not the physical key, right ? Do the tumblers get worn out ? Then again, don't most people use the fob to unlock the doors ?

Google doesn't indicate it's a very common issue or at least I haven't found much that sound similar. What about the "rod" that connects the lock to the actuator ? Here's a diagram: https://www.hondapartsnow.com/genui...oning/front_door_locks_outer_handle,4028829,2
 
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I'd be very surprised if a 10-year-old car with a fob had "worn out" the tumbler. I wonder if the linkage isn't disconnected (you'd have to pop the door panel off to see - it's that piece you linked in the diagram (there should be a plastic clip that secures/connects that, but it's been a while since I've had a door panel off)) or if it wasn't replaced with a different cylinder (though I'd expect the key to not even turn in that case).
 

01rangerxl

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If the key turns, I doubt it's a failure of the cylinder itself. Typically with a bad cylinder it won't turn, at least not in the direction it needs to. There is probably a linkage issue between the cylinder and the lock/latch. Maybe a missing rod or broken plastic retainer for that rod.
 

Hall

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Once I looked at the diagram, I did start suspecting it was the linkage / rod / connection between the lock cylinder and the actuator. Didn't think about a bushing but I think I've seen them before when I've looked at other vehicles. I don't see a bushing spec'd on the diagram so if that's the culprit, hopefully there's generic ones that will work that I can get at O'Reillys or similar.

Seems Honda sells the rod by itself (what I linked above) or an assembly with the rod and (2) bushings... Can also buy the bushings by themselves at $2.30/each. Might just be worth having the dealer order them (so I don't have to pay 5x the cost for 'shipping' from someone online) and have them when I pull the door panel. Then again, pulling panels isn't that difficult.

I'd be very surprised if a 10-year-old car with a fob had "worn out" the tumbler.
I thought the same, plus, who uses their key to unlock their door nowadays when they have a (working) fob ?
 

Hall

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This was much simpler to resolve than I thought after watching videos (of the previous generation - key difference (no pun intended)). If you look at the parts diagram in my first post again, notice the rod sticking straight out of the lock cylinder (# 14)? Honda changed to this design on '12 models while previous years used a flexible cable that turned 90º downward and then had a double-bushing connection into the actuator.

On this model, that rod has an "X" or "+" shaped end that goes directly into a mating connector that's built into the actuator. It's not even necessary to remove the inner door panel. On the latch side of the door, there's a rubber plug that exposes a fastener that secures the lock cylinder housing. You gently pry it away from the outside and when you do, you can see the backside of the actuator (which seems to be mounted higher than previous years as well). Just re-align the rod into the actuator and reassemble.
 
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To prevent and avoid this situation, you should, from time to time, clean the lock from dirt and lubricate it with kerosene or special agents against rust, dust, and freezing.
 
Joined
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To prevent and avoid this situation, you should, from time to time, clean the lock from dirt and lubricate it with kerosene or special agents against rust, dust, and freezing. In addition, to not face a stuck key and not to puzzle over how to get the key out of the door lock, you can hang it on the keyhole cover, which will prevent debris and dust. But since I, like most people, have not found time to how to clean my lock, I have faced a problem. My key was stuck in the door, and it would not come out. Fortunately, a locksmith from the company https://mylocallocksmithtx.com/grand-prairie/ came to my rescue and came right after my call.
 
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