And I'll never use Dry Graphite lube again - a cherished belief Crushed!

Joined
Feb 9, 2005
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BreakFree CLP still have Teflon in it? I'd probably try that since I have a can or two on-hand.
 
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Feb 24, 2019
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There is only one lock lube that I will ever buy it's called houdini and it is amazing. Try it I'm in the electric power transmission business and am responsible in part for all maintenance work in 19 very large power substations. Some of these yards have well in excess of 100 padlocks that live their life out in the the direct elements. Every single lube that has been mentioned so far in this thread WILL attract blow dirt with the exception of Houdini.
 
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Joined
Jan 13, 2013
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Originally Posted by cronk
Ive used 3 in 1 oil from the hardware store with good results.
Never tried that on locks . Mom used to use it on her sewing machine . I have used it for gun oil .
 
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Dec 13, 2004
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I've been using Lock-Ease for years with little issue - should I stop doing that?
As I went through the thread I was starting to wonder if I was the only one still using the stuff. I've been using it for years and no problems, other than the inconvenience of having to wipe the key after use for the first week or so, lest I coat my hands and pockets with the stuff.
 
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Apr 27, 2010
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What about silicone spray? Comes with a straw to get the stuff into the lock. Won't gum up like grease. Protects more than WD40. You probably already have it on the shelf.
 
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I use Houdini and that stuff that comes in a gray can can’t remember the name right off. When I was working alongside a locksmith training to use my key cutting machine she told me never use WD40 or graphite lubricant. I need a lube for my key cutter wonder if Houdini would work?
 
Joined
Jan 2, 2004
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I use Houdini and that stuff that comes in a gray can can’t remember the name right off. When I was working alongside a locksmith training to use my key cutting machine she told me never use WD40 or graphite lubricant. I need a lube for my key cutter wonder if Houdini would work?
Someone at the local Ace recommended that stuff, he sent people to a locksmith that stocked it.

but with a key cutting machine, wouldn’t you need something more conducive for cutting or sliding lubrication to prevent brinelling or fretting wear?
 
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Jan 2, 2021
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BreakFree CLP still have Teflon in it? I'd probably try that since I have a can or two on-hand.
It dries up into a waxy, cosmoline like goop on any surface it's dried on. I wouldn't try it.

Both of my GM/Chevrolet manuals state that one need only periodically (annually) apply a *drop*, maybe two of any synthetic motor oil to a key and work it in out and of course twist the lock open and locked a few times. Withdraw they key and wipe clean. Done. The locks on the external door surfaces are "gated", the metal cover within the keyhole is pushed back when you insert the key. Not weather tight, but it does keep grime and gunk out.

If a key starts to feel stiff in a door lock, the drop of oil and working it around trick seems to keep them going. 🤘
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2021
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Central Pennsylvania
I've used Hornady One-shot Cleaner & Dry Lube with good success. Aerosol, cleans and leaves a Nanoparticle dry lubricant, no residue, no oil, no mess. Works on door hinges too, one shot, squeak is gone.
 
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Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
104
I’ve recently tried spray dry teflon and been disappointed in it. Works well on wooden drawer slides but the 2 door locks I have used it on are sticking.....and they were disassembled and cleaned prior to the spray Teflon. Guess I’ll try the Superlube or 3 in 1.
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
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Graphite dust is for locks protected from weather, like the lock on your front door--protected by the porch. Not for use in padlocks and car locks out in the weather.
 
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