John Deer LA 105 Oil Recomendation

Messages
13
Location
Eastern Pa
Its that time of year, when the mowing season is over and I change the oil in my equipment for the winter. I have a John Deer riding lawnmower, and a Toro push mower. I have been using Mobil One 5/30 in both with no issues, but I wonder if this is the correct oil. Thanks in advance for any help Andy
 
Messages
419
Location
Va
I believe that 5w30 synthetic oil is the recommendation from Briggs and Stratton for all climates. I personally have used 10w 30 conventional, 30HD conventional, 15w 40 conventional and 5w30 synthetic. All with success. I really think that 5w30 synthetic is one of the better choices.
 
Messages
9,120
Location
Illinois
Isn't 5w30 a little thin for summertime use? Barely makes it past 80 degrees. Here's from the John Deere documentation. I'd be using 10w-30, unless you're using it to push snow. Better summertime protection, past 100 degrees.
 
Messages
6,638
Location
South Florida
You didn't say what engine manufacturer you have in your equipment, but Briggs and Stratton's number one oil recommendation FOR ALL THERE SMALL ENGINES is 5W30 synthetic. Let me repeat that for you, Briggs and Stratton's NUMBER ONE oil recommendation FOR ALL THERE SMALL ENGINES is 5W30 synthetic, and has been for at least 5 years now. The chart posted above only applies if you are using conventional, non-synthetic oil. They also recommend 10W30 conventional and SAE30 conventional oil in their engines, but say that 5W30 synthetic oil offers the best protection. Mobil 1 5W30 is a fantastic oil for your application and will serve you well. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Here is the current viscosity chart provided by Briggs and Stratton: Oil Recommendation SAE 30 40° F and higher (5° C and higher) is good for all purpose use above 40° F, use below 40° F will cause hard starting. 10W-30 0 to 100° F (-18 to 38° C) is better for varying temperature conditions. This grade of oil improves cold weather starting, but may increase oil consumption at 80° F(27° C) or higher. Synthetic 5W-30 -20 to 120° F (-30 to 40° C) provides the best protection at all temperatures as well as improved starting with less oil consumption. 5W-30 40° F and below (5° C and below) is recommended for winter use, and works best in cold conditions.
 
Messages
5,069
Location
Saratoga, NY
AndySantoro, bottom line, if you're not experiencing significant consumption with the M1 5W30 synthetic, then you're fine sticking with it. If you have some consumption, and would like it to go down, you could try a 10W30 synthetic which should be a tad more shear-stable than the 5W30. Since these are engines primarily run in warm weather, the extra 1-2% of cold starting ease you will get with a 5W30 probably won't even be noticed. As it is, you are taking better care of your OPE engines than 95% of the buying public. Cheers. Bubbatime posted the officla B&S recommendation, but if I were to pick nits, I think it's a bit naive. They are saying you will get less consumption with straight 30 than 10W30 in warm temps? Maybe ... but only under the most tortuous conditions. Most 10W30 oils are VERY shear stable nowadays ... especially the synthetics and good synthetic blends. Unless you have an application where you start the engine and let it run for several hours or even days, I would never use a straight 30 anymore.
 
Messages
6,638
Location
South Florida
Originally Posted By: Bror Jace
They are saying you will get less consumption with straight 30 than 10W30 in warm temps? Maybe ... but only under the most tortuous conditions. Most 10W30 oils are VERY shear stable nowadays ... especially the synthetics and good synthetic blends. Unless you have an application where you start the engine and let it run for several hours or even days, I would never use a straight 30 anymore.
Down here the conventional 10W30 consumes like crazy in certain engines. If I lived in New York I wouldn't mind using a 10W30. But it absolutely gets guzzled down here. SAE30 use is still highly recommended in this neck of the woods. I run SAE30 in almost everything that can run a 30 weight except Kohler Command engines which get the factory recommended 10W30. Some engines get 15W40 and some get 10W30 synthetic, depending on customer request. Plus, when the OVERNIGHT LOW is 72-79 degrees for about 9 months out of the year, a multi-grade offers zero benefit.
 

JTK

Messages
13,518
Location
Buffalo, NY
Originally Posted By: Bror Jace
Unless you have an application where you start the engine and let it run for several hours or even days, I would never use a straight 30 anymore.
Agreed. Unless the SAE30 is spec'd for HD, Diesel, OPE, etc. use. I see no point in it. I personally see no point in 10w30 anymore either and would just run a 5w30 over a conventional, non OPE SAE30.
 
Messages
6,638
Location
South Florida
Originally Posted By: JTK
I personally see no point in 10w30 anymore either and would just run a 5w30 over a conventional, non OPE SAE30.
Running conventional 5W30 in the south...
 
Messages
10,783
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Originally Posted By: bubbatime
Originally Posted By: JTK
I personally see no point in 10w30 anymore either and would just run a 5w30 over a conventional, non OPE SAE30.
Running conventional 5W30 in the south...
I love it!!!!! Too funny.
 
Messages
265
Location
South La
I use M1 HM 10/30 or WM SuperTec syth 10/30 in all my air cool engines. I change oil once a year and down south here it does get hot. No problems as far as oil levels or protection.
 
Messages
4,560
Location
N.C.
I've been using supertech hd30 wt for years. My liquid cooled Kawasaki smoked on startup with Mobil 1 10w30 years ago when it was fairly new. The dealer said to run it at wot and it would clear up, which it would, until the next cold start, but I switched to straight 30 wt and it stopped smoking on startup...I guessed the 10w30 might have been too thin and could be leaking past the valve seals....IDK. I might try a change this winter with a synthetic HDEO and see what happens.
 
Messages
5,069
Location
Saratoga, NY
gman2304, Try a high-mileage formula if you think the seals might be the source of the leaks/consumption. Other culprits could be the worn valve guides, scratched cylinder walls or worn/sticking piston rings. Oil consumption is not ideal, but a little puff of blue smoke upon start-up is not really a problem provided you run the mower enough after initial start-up that you thoroughly burn off any oil getting into the combustion cylinder so as to not foul the spark plug. In North Carolina, you might be fine with a straight-weight all year 'round. Many of us on this forum deal with sub-freezing temperatures for months every year.
 
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