Is there any practical benefit to letting a passenger car oil warm up before driving?

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What makes their synthetic 75w90 lousy is I have to roll slowly for for near a mile on days the temp is below 20f till the gear lube warms up enough it doesn't put a drag on my car. Next time you leave your driveway on a day in the teens shift your auto trans into neutral and you'll feel yourself slow down same as if you had a sticky caliper.

I even checked their synthetic gear lube msds and there's nothing synthetic otherwise it wouldn't take a mile of rolling for the oil to thin
 
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So then you’re saying it deviates from either the proper winter rating or the grade? That’s agnostic to the base stock composition. If you’re having all those issues you’re probably using the incorrect grade. A synthetic oil may get you better heat resistance but if it’s the same grade then it’s the same grade. Plus a thicker oil will heat up faster than a thinner one. Again not dependent on the base stock.
 
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Lol...let's end this discussion cause I don't want to go around in circles with u...sounds like your a Walmart employee the way your defending them....I specifically said 75w90 gear oil..the only way that's going to warm up is when your rolling. What I'm saying supertech synthetic gear oil isn't synthetic..They're lying because I never had this problem with other gear oils taking so long to warm up.

Have a good day🙂
 

OVERKILL

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I noticed that my Tiguan if the low fuel indicator is on it will shut itself off after a remote start. Machine-imposed "no gas, no idle".
Yup, my FCA products are the same way. You open the door and a message indicates remote start terminated due to fuel level or something along those lines.
 
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Lol...let's end this discussion cause I don't want to go around in circles with u...sounds like your a Walmart employee the way your defending them....I specifically said 75w90 gear oil..the only way that's going to warm up is when your rolling. What I'm saying supertech synthetic gear oil isn't synthetic..They're lying because I never had this problem with other gear oils taking so long to warm up.

Have a good day🙂
We're not going around in any circles at all, you just keep posting incorrect information and I was responding to it.

And nobody is lying. Another thing you seem to want to make up along with my employment.
 

OVERKILL

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What makes their synthetic 75w90 lousy is I have to roll slowly for for near a mile on days the temp is below 20f till the gear lube warms up enough it doesn't put a drag on my car. Next time you leave your driveway on a day in the teens shift your auto trans into neutral and you'll feel yourself slow down same as if you had a sticky caliper.

I even checked their synthetic gear lube msds and there's nothing synthetic otherwise it wouldn't take a mile of rolling for the oil to thin
An MSDS is not a recipe and not all manufacturers call out base oil composition in them. Just because Mobil shows PAO and typically Group III (GTL and otherwise) in their SDS sheets doesn't mean that other brands are going to.

The Winter rating of the gear lube means that it has passed the requisite testing to carry that label:
SAE J306 - Current.jpg


It's likely that Warren (who produces most, if not all, of the Supertech products) is using Group III, which is consistent with the labelling requirements.
 
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Lol...let's end this discussion cause I don't want to go around in circles with u...sounds like your a Walmart employee the way your defending them....I specifically said 75w90 gear oil..the only way that's going to warm up is when your rolling. What I'm saying supertech synthetic gear oil isn't synthetic..They're lying because I never had this problem with other gear oils taking so long to warm up.

Have a good day🙂
Plenty of good options out there if you dont like it.. but syn or conventional doesnt matter for thickness. IF its 75w90 then its 75w90.
For the amount needed you could use redline, amsoil, or motul if it makes you feel better.
 

Astro14

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Lol...let's end this discussion cause I don't want to go around in circles with u...sounds like your a Walmart employee the way your defending them....I specifically said 75w90 gear oil..the only way that's going to warm up is when your rolling. What I'm saying supertech synthetic gear oil isn't synthetic..They're lying because I never had this problem with other gear oils taking so long to warm up.

Have a good day🙂
If the oil is that bad, why is it still in your car?
 
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I always warm up the car because thats what I learned from my father in the old days when he warms up the car before going to school. Thats maybe old news but I still do it now. In winter (which is not very cold here) I let it for at least 2 minutes. In warm weather its 30 sec to a minute. Whether its right or not doing so makes me comfortable so I still do.
 
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Modern engines are built to MUCH tighter tolerances and don't require the warm up of yesteryear. My first car was a 73 Hornet(in 1984) and here in NE Wisconsin in the winter it required at least 2 or 3 min for it to run right. Mostly due to the fact it was carbureted rather than fuel injected. Once TBI and such became common, the classic "warmup" wasn't really necessary. My routine is to start my truck, let the computer boot up, hit the seat heater, steering wheel heater, turn off the autostart(2020 GMC AT4 with 3.0 Duramax), adjust the radio and then go. I leave the heater on but the fan on low so the coolant is first diverted to the cabin heat and warms up quicker. I drive about a mile at 35mph before I really need to get up to speed so no real concern.
 
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People get too myopic about engine warmup when the trans and differential oils are more important in my opinion. My G37 AWD when I put it in neutral before the diff oil is warm will slow me down like I drove thru deep water...so I have to drive around a couple blocks till the lousy supertech gear oil,which I'm draining in August for something better, warms up so I don't feel a drag or blow out my axle seals.
Use Ansoil MT 75w90. That's what I used when I had my 02 Maxima 6 Speed MT. Greatly smoothened shifts vs whatever was in there before I bought it (likely Nissan FF)
 
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Modern engines are built to MUCH tighter tolerances and don't require the warm up of yesteryear. My first car was a 73 Hornet(in 1984) and here in NE Wisconsin in the winter it required at least 2 or 3 min for it to run right. Mostly due to the fact it was carbureted rather than fuel injected. Once TBI and such became common, the classic "warmup" wasn't really necessary. My routine is to start my truck, let the computer boot up, hit the seat heater, steering wheel heater, turn off the autostart(2020 GMC AT4 with 3.0 Duramax), adjust the radio and then go. I leave the heater on but the fan on low so the coolant is first diverted to the cabin heat and warms up quicker. I drive about a mile at 35mph before I really need to get up to speed so no real concern.
I doubt that. Where have you seen production tolerances for engines?
 
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I doubt that. Where have you seen production tolerances for engines?
I'm retired and now work part time at a machine shop where we build mostly old school muscle. We also do modern power as well so I KNOW and SEE the tolerances. I'm telling you for a fact that the tolerances in almost every critical aspect are tighter AND more consistent from the factory now compared to those of years past. From journals, to bearings, piston/ring clearances to oil pumps to oil galleries...it's not a whole lot but they do carry "tighter" specs in most areas we machine. If you think a SBC is anywhere near the technology of a modern Aluminum block, direct injection, directionally cooled, VVT engine then you've been out of the loop for a while now...
 
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I'm retired and now work part time at a machine shop where we build mostly old school muscle. We also do modern power as well so I KNOW and SEE the tolerances. I'm telling you for a fact that the tolerances in almost every critical aspect are tighter AND more consistent from the factory now compared to those of years past. From journals, to bearings, piston/ring clearances to oil pumps to oil galleries...it's not a whole lot but they do carry "tighter" specs in most areas we machine. If you think a SBC is anywhere near the technology of a modern Aluminum block, direct injection, directionally cooled, VVT engine then you've been out of the loop for a while now...
Okay, thanks. But I'm still a little unsure how that's related to the warmup time.
 
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Aluminium and steel have different expansion rates, you don't want to spin up an aluminum block or aluminum rod engine until it's up to temp, but honestly that goes for all engines anyways right.
Moral of the story is you aren't going to hurt anything driving easily when its cold and you aren't going to hurt anything letting it warm up either. So just do what you prefer. I like to hop in a warm vehicle plus I have kids so it's waste fuel and get into a warm truck for me. Not going to lose any sleep over the fuel losses, that's why I own two turbo v8's, terrible choice for fuel savings.
 
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Okay, thanks. But I'm still a little unsure how that's related to the warmup time.
Modern engines have much more strategically placed and often thinner jackets to promote heating and cooling. Open deck design, variable cooling direction etc mean modern powerplants are much more efficient at warming up that straight walled FE engines.
 
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