Hyundai V6 Engines

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Aug 12, 2022
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11
Hyundai V6 Engines use flat tappet solid lifters that are recommended to be lashed at 60,000 miles. I would like to not have to do this if I can minimize the wear by having the best lubricants for this. The 2 engines I have are the Kia Telluride 3.8 liter V6 (13:1) compression and the Genesis GV80 3.5 liter Twin Turbo. I have been using Pennzoil Ultra Platinum full synthetic 5w30 with BG MOA PN115 additive on the Kia Telluride & the Genesis GV80 has free oil changes from the dealer using Quaker State full synthetic 0w30 BG MOA PN115 additive. The Genesis dealer got me onto the BG MOA product saying the drive train would be guaranteed for the life of the car with this and I plan for these 2 cars to be the last I ever buy as long as they hold up.

I bought the BG MOA PN115 cheap @ $7 a can so it isn't hurting me and it had added Zinc which seems to be a positive for wear resistance on flat tappet type cams/lifters. I have read the do and mainly don't s on buying snake oil additives and a good synthetic oil by itself should be all you need. I just don't want to mess with lashing these because I only trust myself doing it. I build engines as a hobby so I can do it. In some of the high pressure friction bearing tests I have seen some additives like Motorkote helped but has high Chlorinated Paraffins which cause other corrosive issues overtime.

Reading these posts makes me realize we have some pretty smart people here and wonder if anyone had some ideas on this? Thanks!
 

JTK

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Aren't these engines shim/bucket lash adjustment like most today? The cams sit right over the valve stems. direct acting style. No rollers, HLA's, etc.
 
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Hyundai V6 Engines use flat tappet solid lifters that are recommended to be lashed at 60,000 miles. I would like to not have to do this if I can minimize the wear by having the best lubricants for this. The 2 engines I have are the Kia Telluride 3.8 liter V6 (13:1) compression and the Genesis GV80 3.5 liter Twin Turbo. I have been using Pennzoil Ultra Platinum full synthetic 5w30 with BG MOA PN115 additive on the Kia Telluride & the Genesis GV80 has free oil changes from the dealer using Quaker State full synthetic 0w30 BG MOA PN115 additive. The Genesis dealer got me onto the BG MOA product saying the drive train would be guaranteed for the life of the car with this and I plan for these 2 cars to be the last I ever buy as long as they hold up.

I bought the BG MOA PN115 cheap @ $7 a can so it isn't hurting me and it had added Zinc which seems to be a positive for wear resistance on flat tappet type cams/lifters. I have read the do and mainly don't s on buying snake oil additives and a good synthetic oil by itself should be all you need. I just don't want to mess with lashing these because I only trust myself doing it. I build engines as a hobby so I can do it. In some of the high pressure friction bearing tests I have seen some additives like Motorkote helped but has high Chlorinated Paraffins which cause other corrosive issues overtime.

Reading these posts makes me realize we have some pretty smart people here and wonder if anyone had some ideas on this? Thanks!
My 4 banger has solid lifters as well, 200k and never adjusted them. For best wear protection on a Korean engine I always recommend the thickest oil it will start with, for me up here in the frigid northeast, that's 15w-50 in the summer and 0w40 in the winter.
 
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You will need to get them checked, no oil or additive is going to fully stop wear on these cam shims. He takes the cams out a around 12:45 in this video, it will give you a idea of the cam bucket and shim set up.
I'm actually doing this on my 1979 CB750 right now and the new shims need to be one size smaller as valve seat wear (valves now sitting slightly higher in the head) has tightened up the clearances between the cam and shims.

 

Rancejunge

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Thanks for all the replies. These engines are cam-over-bucket but isn't this about the same effect as flat tappet? The cam is not hitting a roller with bearings to displace pressure but hitting a flat piece of bucket metal. So I guess what I am looking for are oils that have high pressure lubricant properties. Does anyone know what the highest load pressure is in these modern engines? The rod bearing, Crank bearing, piston side wall load, cam lobe load or high pressure direct injector pump load?

Most oil additives I have researched are worthless, most dilute the properties of really good oil that have already done a lot of research on lubricity.

B1874 Thank you for your great post and video! Very insightful! I had forgotten about seat wear and that is not related to what oil you use. I remember lead in the gas was good for valve seat wear but terrible for the environment. Always a point counterpoint or no free lunch LOL!

I was thinking of using Motorkote for a few thousand miles under continuous long road trip use then change the oil soon before any of the long term effects from Chlorinated Paraffin can happen. It looks like from tests I have seen the benefits cling to the metal after it has been removed.
 
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OVERKILL

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Thanks for all the replies. These engines are cam-over-bucket but isn't this about the same effect as flat tappet? The cam is not hitting a roller with bearings to displace pressure but hitting a flat piece of bucket metal. So I guess what I am looking for are oils that have high pressure lubricant properties.
Cam over bucket is less, often far less, severe in terms of pressure between the lobe/bucket interface than you'd find on a pushrod engine where the lifter is riding a lobe and above it you have the mass of the pushrod and ratio of the rocker to act upon, yet most hydraulic flat tappet applications that weren't GM when they had that run of soft cams, fared just fine on whatever oil was on the shelf at the time, which wasn't anywhere near as good as oils are now.

Project Farm videos are for entertainment only, there's no correlation there between any of these "tests" and actual engines in service.

Avoid chlorinated paraffins.

If you want something with higher levels of AW additives, use a full-SAPS Euro oil, though this is really unnecessary in this application.
 
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Moly is a good AW agent, and Valvoline EP oils have nearly 300ppm of it. The QS synthetic you are using has a good amount as well.
 
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down in the park
Hyundai V6 Engines use flat tappet solid lifters that are recommended to be lashed at 60,000 miles. I would like to not have to do this if I can minimize the wear by having the best lubricants for this. The 2 engines I have are the Kia Telluride 3.8 liter V6 (13:1) compression and the Genesis GV80 3.5 liter Twin Turbo. I have been using Pennzoil Ultra Platinum full synthetic 5w30 with BG MOA PN115 additive on the Kia Telluride & the Genesis GV80 has free oil changes from the dealer using Quaker State full synthetic 0w30 BG MOA PN115 additive. The Genesis dealer got me onto the BG MOA product saying the drive train would be guaranteed for the life of the car with this and I plan for these 2 cars to be the last I ever buy as long as they hold up.

I bought the BG MOA PN115 cheap @ $7 a can so it isn't hurting me and it had added Zinc which seems to be a positive for wear resistance on flat tappet type cams/lifters. I have read the do and mainly don't s on buying snake oil additives and a good synthetic oil by itself should be all you need. I just don't want to mess with lashing these because I only trust myself doing it. I build engines as a hobby so I can do it. In some of the high pressure friction bearing tests I have seen some additives like Motorkote helped but has high Chlorinated Paraffins which cause other corrosive issues overtime.

Reading these posts makes me realize we have some pretty smart people here and wonder if anyone had some ideas on this? Thanks!

it's extremely rare for ohc engines needing lash adjustment, and those that do likely had out of spec clearance from the get go if not abused.
 
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I would use good oil and do 5k oil changes. Then wait and see how it's running at 60k and go from there.
 
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You have to remember that as an exhaust valve wears it recedes into the head making the valve to bucket/cam clearance less. In days of old intake valves tended to be right on or a little loose. Exhaust valves were always tight.
 
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I doubt you’ll need to reshim the buckets at all. Hyundai claims to use a “diamond like coating” (DLC) on the buckets. The only times I’ve heard of a Hyundai engine needing to be reshimmed was when the engine was severely neglected.

IMO, I’d be more worried about the rod bearings fail than anything else. All of Hyundai’s GDI engines have a history of rod bearing failures.
 
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My relative has a Hyundai V-6. It requires that valve adjustment. Now at 180,000 miles it has never been adjusted and runs like new. Not that I recommend going that long.
 
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Cincinnati
Hyundai V6 Engines use flat tappet solid lifters that are recommended to be lashed at 60,000 miles. I would like to not have to do this if I can minimize the wear by having the best lubricants for this. The 2 engines I have are the Kia Telluride 3.8 liter V6 (13:1) compression and the Genesis GV80 3.5 liter Twin Turbo. I have been using Pennzoil Ultra Platinum full synthetic 5w30 with BG MOA PN115 additive on the Kia Telluride & the Genesis GV80 has free oil changes from the dealer using Quaker State full synthetic 0w30 BG MOA PN115 additive. The Genesis dealer got me onto the BG MOA product saying the drive train would be guaranteed for the life of the car with this and I plan for these 2 cars to be the last I ever buy as long as they hold up.

I bought the BG MOA PN115 cheap @ $7 a can so it isn't hurting me and it had added Zinc which seems to be a positive for wear resistance on flat tappet type cams/lifters. I have read the do and mainly don't s on buying snake oil additives and a good synthetic oil by itself should be all you need. I just don't want to mess with lashing these because I only trust myself doing it. I build engines as a hobby so I can do it. In some of the high pressure friction bearing tests I have seen some additives like Motorkote helped but has high Chlorinated Paraffins which cause other corrosive issues overtime.

Reading these posts makes me realize we have some pretty smart people here and wonder if anyone had some ideas on this? Thanks!

"......recommended to be lashed at 60,000 miles....."

Uh, as in "tied to the mast and lashed repeatedly?"

Seriously. I have a 2015 3.3L Santa Fe and I obviously missed that admonishment.

Where does that come from?

What model years are your (nice) G80 and Kis?

It sounds like another "dealer add on..."

Isn't the drivetrain warranty guaranteeing 10 yr/100k?
 

Rancejunge

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Joined
Aug 12, 2022
Messages
11
Kia Telluride is 2022 Genesis GV80 is a 2021. Lambda engines use two timing chains (by one for each head) and variable valve timing (Hyundai's CVVT). The valves are actuated via solid buckets (there are not hydraulic cam followers). In this case, the adjustment is required every 60,000 miles (100,000 km).
 
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