Honda timing belts........

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The Honda ones are THAT tight & as Trav pointed out.....The Buick 3800's are notorious as well.

Since I posted to this thread......Did a timing belt job on a 2011 Odyssey J35, My 3/4" impact wouldn't do it even after bypassing the regulator on my compressor to 185 psi. Had to use the breaker bar & starter trick, Took approximately 11 tries !!!!!!

I don't think there's a 1/2" drive impact on the planet that would've broke this one loose.
 
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The Honda ones are THAT tight & as Trav pointed out.....The Buick 3800's are notorious as well.

Since I posted to this thread......Did a timing belt job on a 2011 Odyssey J35, My 3/4" impact wouldn't do it even after bypassing the regulator on my compressor to 185 psi. Had to use the breaker bar & stater trick, Took approximately 11 tries !!!!!!

I don't think there's a 1/2" drive impact on the planet that would've broke this one loose.

Well, one thing I think we can safely say Cline, is that none of us have to worry about the crazy things falling off!


When Deboss garage was shilling for the Milwaukee Fuel stuff, I sent him an email begging to find a couple of J Series cars to take the crank bolts off of. Never did it. Probably tried and failed and deleted the footage!! LOL.

I will be really interested the next time I do the TL. I put oil in all the spots that the FSM said to put oil. Who wants to take the bet that I'll still have to starter bump it?
 
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Guys I know what it’s like to struggle with these crank bolts. The makita XWT08Z impact is my answer to any of these super stubborn bolts. It truly is one awesome impact. It is however large and heavy. Nowadays you can find the tool only fairly cheap too. Worked out great for me being I already have a makita lineup. 239 bucks and it came with a free 5ah battery. Milwaukee also has one that’s just as or even more powerful. It’s always going back and forth between the 2 on who has the latest most power. Both are quality tools I just think makita is a bit better.


Have you ever tried it on a Honda bolt?
 
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4,974
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Fort Worth, Texas
Well, one thing I think we can safely say Cline, is that none of us have to worry about the crazy things falling off!


When Deboss garage was shilling for the Milwaukee Fuel stuff, I sent him an email begging to find a couple of J Series cars to take the crank bolts off of. Never did it. Probably tried and failed and deleted the footage!! LOL.

I will be really interested the next time I do the TL. I put oil in all the spots that the FSM said to put oil. Who wants to take the bet that I'll still have to starter bump it?

If an electric 1/2" impact could do several different J-series untouched crank bolts.....I'd be beyond impressed & would invest in one. But I'm a sceptic when it comes to electric 1/2" stuff as I've seen them fall short of what a ancient IR 231 will do @ 150 psi with good volume.

I have relapsed all my air powered 3/8" drive Impacts & Ratchets with electric & has worked out very well, So I'm not against electric/battery powered tools.
 
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sw ohio
The Honda ones are THAT tight & as Trav pointed out.....The Buick 3800's are notorious as well.

Since I posted to this thread......Did a timing belt job on a 2011 Odyssey J35, My 3/4" impact wouldn't do it even after bypassing the regulator on my compressor to 185 psi. Had to use the breaker bar & starter trick, Took approximately 11 tries !!!!!!

I don't think there's a 1/2" drive impact on the planet that would've broke this one loose.
What about using that high mass Lisle socket with your impact? Several YouTubes show that combo just zipping that bolt off.
 
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CA
What about using that high mass Lisle socket with your impact? Several YouTubes show that combo just zipping that bolt off.
The results have been inconsistent for me.
The only tool combination that has delivered consistent results would be the crank pulley holder, two breaker bars and a 5’ piece of pipe.
 
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The results have been inconsistent for me.
The only tool combination that has delivered consistent results would be the crank pulley holder, two breaker bars and a 5’ piece of pipe.
THe Ingersoll power sockets are the key. I have done over a dozen Honda belts since I bought that socket. I take them out with that socket and my cordless impact. Only use the holding tool to torque the bolt anymore
 
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That looks like a BBK Audi S4 motor. The timing chain guides are plastic and will fail if not replaced with metal ones.
 
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Fort Worth, Texas
Got another Honda Odyssey in for a Timing Belt, 2012 model with 130,xxx on the clock. From what I can tell has never been apart before.
Based on Timmastertech's recommendation.....I bought a Ingersoll Rand 19mm power socket. And I bought a Milwaukee 2767 1/2" drive impact......
It zipped the crank bolt right off, Not exactly a scientific test by any means but next time I'll try my IR 231 with the power socket to see what happens.

Far as the Milwaukee impact......I don't like it, It's bulky & far too heavy to use it like I do my IR 231. Not that I bought it for production work in the shop. I'll use it for stuff out of reach of my air system.
Another thing I noticed.....Extensions & Impact Wobble Sockets kills the power more so than with a air impact.




 
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I did the TB on my 2012 odyssey last year
I used the aisin kit from rockauto
Most difficult part was getting off the crank bolt was unreal...
Had to go buy hi flow fitting for my air compressor and impact wrench.
Crank pulley holder tool and lisle heavy wall crank bolt socket.
The rear cam has to be slightly rotated forward(1/2 tooth) to get the belt on the correct tooth, use a wrench or breaker bar not a ratchet
Tensioner had a slight leak at 112k on original belt components

Pro tip
Also make sure you torque all fittings and don't forget to torque the PS pump and drive to Disney world and back before checking that the bolts are only finger tight.....🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️
 
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1,196
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Athens, GA
Pro tip
Also make sure you torque all fittings and don't forget to torque the PS pump and drive to Disney world and back before checking that the bolts are only finger tight.....🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️

Ooops. It happens. Tear anything up?

Also, looking at that 130k pic Cline posted makes me wonder what mileage Honda tested that system too. Just about every one I've ever seen come off looks practically brand new. Granted, you can't judge just by the looks, but I think there's a ton of wiggle room built into that 105k mile replacement requirement.
 
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Also, looking at that 130k pic Cline posted makes me wonder what mileage Honda tested that system too. Just about every one I've ever seen come off looks practically brand new. Granted, you can't judge just by the looks, but I think there's a ton of wiggle room built into that 105k mile replacement requirement.

That's a new belt, But.....The original belt was in good shape. Had a bad/leaky Tensioner causing noise. I have no doubt these belts can go 200K, But rarely can the Tensioner go that far.

I've seen Toyota UZ & MZ belts go 300K before failure, Though they are a much wider belt & Toyota obviously uses a better Tensioner
 
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The rear cam has to be slightly rotated forward(1/2 tooth) to get the belt on the correct tooth, use a wrench or breaker bar not a ratchet

I recommend against rotating the rear cam gear clockwise, Rotate the front cam gear counter clockwise to remove & install the timing belt. In Fact.....I stop a little short (One tooth) of TDC at the Crank so the rear cam doesn't jump clockwise on valve spring pressure.

Before removing the old belt, I mark it with a paint pen at the 2 cam gear alignment marks....Then transfer the marks to the new belt.
Start with the rear cam which is still out of position-counter clockwise & secure the belt to the cam gear with the painted mark aligned with the mark on the cam gear (I use a Zip Tie).
Rotate the front cam gear counter clockwise 'till you can slip the belt on with the 2 marks aligned, Secure the belt to the cam gear. Now you can use your small breaker bar & 17mm socket to pull BOTH cam gears clockwise into alignment.

The crank will still be set a little counter clockwise from TDC.....That's good as you can slip the belt on & turn it clockwise to take up the slack & it will be dead on.
While holding the belt in place......Install the lower Belt Guard as it will keep the belt on the crank gear while you install the Tensioner.

I like to put a flat blade screwdriver between the tensioner & tensioner pulley assembly before pulling the pin & slowly releasing the tensioner.
 
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