HELP! ECHO Leaf Blower Octane Question

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6
Location
NJ
Hey there, I have a spanking brand new ECHO leaf blower (PB-251) that I got yesterday for Father's Day and had a question about octane. I mixed up a one-gallon batch of 2 cycle fuel mix using 87 octane and in my excitement forgot that the manual calls for 89 until just now. I topped off the blower with the 87 mix yesterday and all seemed fine when I ran it. I am concerned however that I might do damage to the engine running the 87 mix (detonation, pinging, etc). I think my options are: 1. Dump all the 87 mix in and start over with 89? (This is a pain because I have to dispose the 87 mix and waste money.) 2. Use some Lucas Octane Booster that I have to bring the fuel up to 89. Is this even safe to do to a leaf blower? 3. Run it in my lawn mower. 4. Run it in my Volvo turbo wagon. :) 5. Run the blower with the 87 and don't worry about it. What should I do? Thanks!
 

nrvous

Thread starter
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6
Location
NJ
Think I'll cause any damage to the engine, especially since it's brand new and still in the break in period? Kills me to run the 87 as I swore I was going to maintain this blower 'by the book'!
 
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JHZR2

Staff member
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44,859
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New Jersey
My father has operated his echo chainsaw on 87 for about 25 years now... I would go with the right fuel, but wouldnt worry about it much.
 
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4,622
Location
Western Washington
No, you will not cause any damage to your engine. Just don't let that gas sit and get old, as it loses octane while sitting. The reason you want to run 89 is because when you add oil to gas it lowers the octane about 2 points. So by starting out with 89 you're actually running 87 ( or so ). Which means that this batch you mixed up is around 85 octane, again no big deal as long as you use it fairly quickly, say within 45-60 days or so. BTW, you can safely run this in your mower to help use it up, no problem. Congratulations on the blower, Echo makes some good products :)
 
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5
Location
northern michigan
If you read the warranty page in the manual, it will state that the warranty is void with the use of 87 octane fuel. They have had some ring sticking issues that have scored the cylinders. Dump the fuel into your car(the 2 oz of oil won't hurt anything in a large tank),mix a fresh batch with premium & you're only out about 2 bucks. Bob
 

nrvous

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6
Location
NJ
That's exactly what I was worried about! If I put it in the car it won't damage the cat or O2 sensors, etc?
 
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4,622
Location
Western Washington
 Originally Posted By: baddad
If you read the warranty page in the manual, it will state that the warranty is void with the use of 87 octane fuel. They have had some ring sticking issues that have scored the cylinders. Dump the fuel into your car(the 2 oz of oil won't hurt anything in a large tank),mix a fresh batch with premium & you're only out about 2 bucks. Bob
If the rings stick, it's not due to the octane rating of the fuel. Too much oil in the fuel, or set too rich on the carb, or poor quality mix ( or a combination of these ) are what makes rings stick. BTW, stuck rings generally will not score the cylider, they simply will not create compression.
 
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Western Washington
Also, don't use premium, simply because they are not selling as much of it these days due to the higher cost, therefore it sits longer at the gas sation and could be quite old when you buy it. Much better to get some 89 octane from a bigger gas station that moves a lot of gas and use it up within 60-90 days.
 
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3,029
Location
Richmond, VA
1. My Echo 2601 weedeater that is now at least 10 years old gets a steady diet of 87 octane and Amsoil syn mix at 80:1 and runs flawlessly with virtually zero maintenance. I've never done anything other than change air filters and this was used commercially for 6 years. 2. If it is the same engine 25.1cc at least when I bought it they were/are bullitproof. Unless you run it without mixed gas you honestly cannot kill it (trust me some of my employees tried after 7 straight hours of weedeating embankments) 3. Don't worry about the gas sitting too long in a gas can, sure it may lose a few octane but I have used gas in a can that has been sitting for 7-8 months with zero problems. Just do NOT let gas sit in the trimmer for more than a month. Run it dry if you are going to let it sit for a month or more. 4. I love mine, still idles perfectly - go to sleep and don't worry about it.
 
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1,928
Location
Ohio,USA
 Originally Posted By: hate2work
Also, don't use premium, simply because they are not selling as much of it these days due to the higher cost, therefore it sits longer at the gas sation and could be quite old when you buy it. Much better to get some 89 octane from a bigger gas station that moves a lot of gas and use it up within 60-90 days.
Just what would lead you to believe that 89-octane fuel would be, for the lack of a better term, fresher? The fact is that beyond Echo's requirement for their power equipment, I've never seen any vehicle that calls for a mid-grade gasoline. Regular, yes. Premium, yes. Mid-grade, never once in all of my, or my father's, years.
 
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3,029
Location
Richmond, VA
hunter, I do not recall if it was in the manual or if the dealer told me but I also recall that 89 oct is required, but like I said over 10 years on mine with 87 oct with zero problems
 
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nrvous

Thread starter
Messages
6
Location
NJ
Looks like I can't take the risk of voiding the warranty. That's why I wanted the ECHO in the first place - for the 5 year warranty. Going to try to find a gas station to take the 87 mix or run it in my car if I can't come up with another option. Thanks for all the help.
 
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1,928
Location
Ohio,USA
 Originally Posted By: Barkleymut
hunter, I do not recall if it was in the manual or if the dealer told me but I also recall that 89 oct is required, but like I said over 10 years on mine with 87 oct with zero problems
Yeah, that's what I meant. That while Echo requires it, I've never seen anyone else do so. I can't imagine there are enough Echo owners, putting enough time on their equipment, to burn through enough 89-octane to ensure it's fresher than the premium gasoline at any particular station.
 
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3,029
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Richmond, VA
nrvous, if you cannot stomach running it in your blower then please put it in your car. There is no chance that 2 or 3 oz of a lubricant will affect 14 gallons (1792 oz)
 
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39,806
Location
Great Lakes
 Originally Posted By: hate2work
Also, don't use premium, simply because they are not selling as much of it these days due to the higher cost, therefore it sits longer at the gas sation and could be quite old when you buy it. Much better to get some 89 octane from a bigger gas station that moves a lot of gas and use it up within 60-90 days.
AFAIK, most stations don't actually have a dedicated tank for 89 octane gas. They have an 87 octane tank and an 91/93 octane tank. Then they blend the two in correct proportions if someone chooses to buy 89. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Do_gas_stations_mix_87_octane_and_91_octane_at_the_pump_to_make_89_octane
 
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2,044
Location
Toronto-ish, Canada
 Originally Posted By: hate2work
 Originally Posted By: baddad
If you read the warranty page in the manual, it will state that the warranty is void with the use of 87 octane fuel. They have had some ring sticking issues that have scored the cylinders. Dump the fuel into your car(the 2 oz of oil won't hurt anything in a large tank),mix a fresh batch with premium & you're only out about 2 bucks. Bob
If the rings stick, it's not due to the octane rating of the fuel. Too much oil in the fuel, or set too rich on the carb, or poor quality mix ( or a combination of these ) are what makes rings stick. BTW, stuck rings generally will not score the cylider, they simply will not create compression.
IMO, these and other arguments are simply academic if the warranty page says to use 89 or better. The machine is brand new (probably for Father's Day). Preserve the warranty and call it a lesson learned. It's a shame to waste, but you aren't out that much cash. People put 2-stroke oil in their automotive fuel on purpose, you should be fine. But if you're squeamish about that too, just top off the pre-mix can with fuel and run it out in the mower.
 
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Messages
4,622
Location
Western Washington
 Originally Posted By: rshunter
 Originally Posted By: hate2work
Also, don't use premium, simply because they are not selling as much of it these days due to the higher cost, therefore it sits longer at the gas sation and could be quite old when you buy it. Much better to get some 89 octane from a bigger gas station that moves a lot of gas and use it up within 60-90 days.
Just what would lead you to believe that 89-octane fuel would be, for the lack of a better term, fresher? The fact is that beyond Echo's requirement for their power equipment, I've never seen any vehicle that calls for a mid-grade gasoline. Regular, yes. Premium, yes. Mid-grade, never once in all of my, or my father's, years.
Evidently you didn't read my post that you quoted. The answer is right there. Not only have I seen that first hand in my business, but it has been confirmed many times through the station owners as well. The fact is that they just don't move as much premium fuel as the other two, therefore there is a chance that you could be buying ( and paying a premium for ) less fresh gasoline. BTW, Stihl also recommends 89 octane gas, it's right in their manuals.
 
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