Gun oil article

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502
Location
OR, USA
I'll admit that I don't have very many guns with solid wood stocks or grips so I wasn't thinking of oil softening wood. And yes, revolvers are prone to being disabled by small amounts of dirt and varnish. Which is why revolvers in particular should be kept clean and any gun is better off using oils that don't cause varnish. BSW
 
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6,639
Location
South Florida
It's pretty obvious that the "military authorities" referenced in the article are 3rd world military authorities and not USA/Canada or any other western army that can afford to give their troops NATO authorized small arms lubricants. For the peasant soldiers of Cambodia, many parts of Africa, Muslim soldiers, and parts of South America, yes, they would benefit by lubricating and cleaning their weapons with readily available ATF and motor oil, rather than cooking oils. I think we can all agree on that premise. Cooking oils go rancid and turn to a sticky mess that could get a soldier killed.
 
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73
Location
Mississippi
I have pretty much stopped using oil on my guns except for maybe little bit swabbed inside the bore. For past couple of years I have used some type of carnuba spray wax. Automotive type. Use on metal, wood,and synthetic stocks. Works great. I have tried several types and they all work the same but My favorite is called protectall.
 

AMC

Messages
957
Location
South Eastern, CT
Originally Posted by ChrisD46
I'd have no problem using Corrosion X for protection to wipe down all metal parts - for lube on critical parts I'd be inclined to use an oil more specific for the task .
Don't let the name fool you, Corrosion-X is an amazing lubricant first and foremost. It just happens to be an excellent rust preventer and penetrant also.
 
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517
Location
MD
Originally Posted by AMC
Originally Posted by ChrisD46
I'd have no problem using Corrosion X for protection to wipe down all metal parts - for lube on critical parts I'd be inclined to use an oil more specific for the task .
Don't let the name fool you, Corrosion-X is an amazing lubricant first and foremost. It just happens to be an excellent rust preventer and penetrant also.
Glad to hear that, as I've been using Corrosion X for Guns as the lube on all lube points (including rails) of the ARs recently. No issues so far.
 
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256
Location
ga
Been using atf on my guns and motorcycle chains for years. Works good lasts a long time. I do add a couple table spoons of 80W90 to to container I use for chain oil and a little surplus gun oil used on the GAU-8 in the A-10 Warthog in that I use for guns.
 
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102
Location
IN
The AR aside, I don't understand the fascination with running guns "wet." Even for the AR, that's for desert or "moon dust" environments. Most guns just don't need it. Also, btw, I've seen a bunch of guys suffer lube-related failures taking over-oiled shotguns out for pheasant, rabbit, etc when it's down near zero.
 
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6,748
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
I've found if you run an AR wet, they clean up a lot easier. Especially if you get them good and hot in the process. A lot of this is common sense. If you're hunting birds, deer, whatever, you're only going to fire a few rounds in an entire afternoon. So a lot of lubrication isn't required. And may be detrimental in very cold weather. But shooting an AR or auto pistol at the range on a hot Summer day, extra lubrication is going to be far more of a benefit than less.
 
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102
Location
IN
Originally Posted by billt460
I've found if you run an AR wet, they clean up a lot easier. Especially if you get them good and hot in the process. A lot of this is common sense. If you're hunting birds, deer, whatever, you're only going to fire a few rounds in an entire afternoon. So a lot of lubrication isn't required. And may be detrimental in very cold weather. But shooting an AR or auto pistol at the range on a hot Summer day, extra lubrication is going to be far more of a benefit than less.
I'll give you the AR point. Thing is a carbon collecting machine. Re semiauto pistols, anyway, I've never found any of mine -- Colt, Sig, Beretta, S&W & Ruger at the moment -- difficult no matter the round count. I generally clean with G-96, hit the slides with some very light-consistency grease -- been using Lubriplate SFL-0 lately -- and a couple drops of oil where maker recommends, and I'm done. Matter of fact, only gun I really hate cleaning or find it a chore: Yep, the AR.
 
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325
Location
Northern KY
Originally Posted by billt460
Originally Posted by bsmithwins
Originally Posted by UG_Passat
.......More oil isn't better.
I've never seen a gun too oily to work, Ive seen several that were too dry to run, including a Glock. BSW
The only thing they proved is that guns in ideal conditions aren't harmed by overlubrication. Let them drag those guns around in the dirt for a couple of days and see how well they cycle. There is absolutely such a thing as overlubrication of a gun, just like there is with an engine. It was really dumb when one of them was joking about attracting sand when they went directly from th lube bath to shooting them. Lube doesn't "attract" sand, but a gun dripping with lube will certainly trap the dust and sand that it contacts. There are three conditions of lubrication: over, under and correct. Strive for correct.
 
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102
Location
IN
"The only thing they proved is that guns in ideal conditions aren't harmed by overlubrication. Let them drag those guns around in the dirt for a couple of days and see how well they cycle. There is absolutely such a thing as overlubrication of a gun, just like there is with an engine. It was really dumb when one of them was joking about attracting sand when they went directly from th lube bath to shooting them. Lube doesn't "attract" sand, but a gun dripping with lube will certainly trap the dust and sand that it contacts. There are three conditions of lubrication: over, under and correct. Strive for correct." Way too much sense in one place.
 
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3,310
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Parts Unknown
Originally Posted by bsmithwins
Originally Posted by UG_Passat
Originally Posted by buck91
Originally Posted by 007
Too much oil of any kind is a BAD thing in ANY firearm!
This is not the common wisdom in AR land.
More oil isn't better. More can be detrimental, where it can drip and lubricate the cartridge case inside the chamber, causing a failure of the cartridge case inside the chamber. There is a sweet spot for lubrication.
I've never seen a gun too oily to work, Ive seen several that were too dry to run, including a Glock. If you're talking about oil getting into the primer and causing a failure to fire, that can happen. Ammunition you're staking your life on should have sealed primers to prevent exactly that type of failure. BSW
Much of the commercial ammo doesn't require primer joint sealant. Military ammo requires sealant in the casemouth and primer joint. But the issue is lubrication of the chamber and thus the case, by changing the friction, the brass case can expand too much and fail.. This is why for the military the gun experts specify the sweet spot for lubrication in the manuals
 
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6,748
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
Originally Posted by Elkins45
Let them drag those guns around in the dirt for a couple of days and see how well they cycle.
They could put them in a vice and beat them with a 12 pound sledge while they're at it. duh
 
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3,269
Location
West Michigan
Originally Posted by UG_Passat
...Much of the commercial ammo doesn't require primer joint sealant. Military ammo requires sealant in the casemouth and primer joint. But the issue is lubrication of the chamber and thus the case, by changing the friction, the brass case can expand too much and fail.. This is why for the military the gun experts specify the sweet spot for lubrication in the manuals
Any idea which, if any, commercial loads use sealant? I believe Federal XM193 does, correct?
 
Messages
102
Location
IN
I've seen seen beginners bring .22LR pistols to the Illinois concealed carry qualifier (.22s are allowed) they've either never field stripped/cleaned/lube cleaned or cleaned but then (a) oiled the whiz out of 'em or (b) not lubed at all. Invariably, those guns start to have feed problems. Fortunately, a quick field strip, a spritz of whatever CLP product is handy and some quick work with a toothbrush and a rag will put 'em up and running. Also, I've seen revolvers gunked up at the crane, the latch, the ejection rod, etc. Some were in like new condition, just over "cared for" and stored poorly. All guns aren't ARs, and some are less tolerant of improper care than others. Gun care is not a huge hairy deal, but I think especially among beginners or the non-enthusiast, there is some apprehension about it, and they tend to use either no lube product or too much or some "wonder" solution that isn't. There's certainly a sweet spot, IMO, and it's moderate, usually modest, lubrication.
 
Messages
325
Location
Northern KY
Originally Posted by billt460
Originally Posted by Elkins45
Let them drag those guns around in the dirt for a couple of days and see how well they cycle.
They could put them in a vice and beat them with a 12 pound sledge while they're at it. duh
I've been shooting for close to 50 years. I have frequently carried guns in conditions where they were exposed to dirt, leaves, pollen, dust, sand, etc. I have yet to have carried them in conditions where they were subjected to random severe impacts. Perhaps your experience has been different.
 
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6,748
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
Originally Posted by Elkins45
I've been shooting for close to 50 years. I have frequently carried guns in conditions where they were exposed to dirt, leaves, pollen, dust, sand, etc..
You didn't, "drag them through the dirt for a couple of days". And if all you were doing was simply trying to prove a point by being a bit over dramatic,......... So was Vickers.
 
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4,177
Location
Texas
I have been using ATF and / or engine oil on my guns for 10 - 20 years ( I use grease on the Garand & M1A ) . No problems . I run a new AR wet with ATF during break in . Kind of messy , the excess gets slung off , but no big deal . If you want to get specific , engine oil is probably better in summer & ATF in winter . Due to viscosity . Although 5W-30 synthetic would probably be fine , year round . I have read of the Russians , during WWII , thinning their gun oil ( engine oil ? ) with gasoline in the winter . Do not know if that is true ? Thanks , :-)
 
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