Flushed 2013 camry atf

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You can mark the stick at cold.
That is a bit of a slippery slope. Hypothetically, you would need to correct the fluid level when the trans fluid is "hot" in order to have an accurate cold level.

Some manufacturers provide instructions on what they consider to be hot - and this often includes a specific trans fluid temp range. If the user does not own a scan tool that can verify the fluid temp, the trans may be overfilled (or underfilled) when hot, which leads to an incorrect cold reading. And often times, a warmed up engine (from a coolant or oil temp standpoint) does not result in a trans that is warmed up; my truck is a great example of this.
 
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You can mark the stick at cold.
There’s no stick. It’s a straw that allows the trans to trickle out to the correct level, hard to explain. But you only check at a certain fluid temp window and it is a pretty small and precise window.

I ran through the gears after a drain and fill, performed the procedure to verify the desired temp was achieved, and within that time, running through gears just 1 more time, I was hotter than the desired temp already. Engine was not at operating temp. It was a warmer day outside, but if I remember right, I only hit reverse and shifted through forward gears 2 times each before I exceeded the desired temp and had to wait for cooldown.
 
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Toyota don’t want y’all to be doing transmisson service it’s filled for life darn it please listen to the car manufacturers and trust them they will never steer u wrong 🤓
 
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I’ve never used a temp gun. The straw itself is crude because the spill rate is a little subjective while the engine is running. plus the operating temp for the trans could be -20f to 220f, with all of the shrinkage and expansion in between. I just do it warm, by hand. Good hot bath temp. :)

the only time I screwed up is when I ran it while draining, getting 6.5 quarts out over the normal 4. Heads explode when I mention this, but it’s still pumping oil/foam, with no clutches engaged and no load. Have done it for years for the first change I might do on a car with unknown history. During refill, I waited until the straw *stopped* straw And didn’t realize there was still air in it. it didn’t sound right on the test drive, and it took 2 more quarts after that to reach the straw.

i prefer a dipstick to the straw, but after getting the feel for it, it’s been fine. I know the straw method may not reveal bubbles well, and that you cap it when itnchanges from FLOW to sort-of-sloshing-flow and not when it’s Not Flowing.
 

xgmad

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Feb 6, 2021
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Toyota don’t want y’all to be doing transmisson service it’s filled for life darn it please listen to the car manufacturers and trust them they will never steer u wrong 🤓
lol, they sure made it a "lifetime" fill by including a transmission cooler with a conveniently placed return line :ROFLMAO: . I never listen to recommendations from that darn service manual, a bunch of nonsense! 0w20? more like 5w30 and above! T-ws only? more like cheap valvoline maxlife that is waay better...for my POCKET! :ROFLMAO:
 
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So today I flushed the camry's transmission fluid, the odometer was at 90,052.

At 90,052 and mostly being highway miles, the fluid did still have a redish tint to it, so it is possible to just flush it at 100,000 but I flushed early.

View attachment 83133

Flushing this transmission was very easy to do, but it sucks that you must open a wheel to get to the fill port, if there is an adapter to pump fluid into the pan, get that instead of having to open the wheel as the adapter will make it much easier to do.

You will need 3 jugs of valvoline maxlife (what I used and is 17.99 on amazon per gallon) or whatever you prefer and also a transmission filter.

-IMPORTANT to make sure the car is leveled when you are doing this for accurate final fill of transmission fluid

You will need allen key set to loosen the pan drain plug and the straw that helps with the level, a ratcheting clamp remover (which made the job waaay easier, but optional) , a good big pan able to hold around 8 quarts, and some tubing that is 1/4, and a hand pump or whatever pump you have to pump the new fluid into the pan (if you have an adapter) or the side port.

Locate the transmission cooler View attachment 83135 <--- It looks like this , locate the lower tube on the cooler, follow that tube and it should go down, and at the end of that tube, disconnect it, and then in the metal pipe sticking out, insert your tubing, and then route the tubing into a pan or something.


Go underneath the car where the transmission pan is, remove the hex bolt, it should be on tight , so use some strength, and then some fluid might come out, if not, with the same allen key, remove the inner plastic straw, and then the old fluid should come out, with the straw out, if you have a transmission filter, remove the whole pan, remove and insert a new filter, screw in your fill adapter if you have it and then connect it to your pump and transmission fluid jug with new fluid in it, make sure you pump at least 4 quarts into the pan, no worries of overfilling as this is going to be used to flush everything out, after you have done that, start the car and make sure you turn it off if bubbles start coming out IMMEDIATLEY! , I stayed on the safe side and just let the car run for 3 seconds, pump new transmission fluid, and then repeat that until new fluid starts coming out.

Once new fluid comes out, make sure you put the return line back and put the clamp back on.
Underneath the pan, remove the adapter, put the straw back in first and then bolt.
Let the car get to operating temperature, and then open the drain bolt again to check if fluid is coming out , if alot of fluid is coming out, let it drain until it starts trickling, if no fluid comes out, you will need to fill the pan more. After you have gotten the final fill completed, put the drain plug back in. You should be done.

Don't do this in a transmission with like 400,000 miles and the fluid was never changed, at this point you might need another transmission or rebuild it.
I would do a drain and fill, a la spill and fill, easier to do when cold, I have seen successes with this method to use the trans pump to get all the fluid out but I would prefer a slow and gradual method.

I have always taken reading COLD, since hot can vary.. and replaced same amount as removed after this reading.
 
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There’s no stick. It’s a straw that allows the trans to trickle out to the correct level, hard to explain. But you only check at a certain fluid temp window and it is a pretty small and precise window.

I ran through the gears after a drain and fill, performed the procedure to verify the desired temp was achieved, and within that time, running through gears just 1 more time, I was hotter than the desired temp already. Engine was not at operating temp. It was a warmer day outside, but if I remember right, I only hit reverse and shifted through forward gears 2 times each before I exceeded the desired temp and had to wait for cooldown.
Sounds like my Beetle’s transmission pan. It’s the same way. Thanks for clarifying.

On my Chrysler T&C, I had a clean, empty catch pan underneath to catch the fluid, then I used a marked gallon jug to measure what came out. I put in the same amount of fluid.

However, I’m always nervous about getting it right, so I’m not quick to do transmission fluid changes. The mood has to be right…..
 
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