Different brand tires right and left side.

atikovi

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Call me a pessimistic sob, but I would imagine that if you were involved in a wreck, even if it wasn't your fault, the opposing courtroom lawyer would tear you to shreds with that setup. But, hey, I guess I'm just somebody who always imagines the worst case scenario.
Nope because there is nothing illegal about it. Show me one state that requires the same brand of tire on the same axle. Here is the state inspection tire requirements for Maryland, one of the hardest states to pass inspection in: http://mdrules.elaws.us/comar/11.14.02.04 See #6 where it says, (6) Tires are not the same type of construction or size on the same axle of the vehicle. (Difference in brand or tread design is not cause for rejection.) Tire construction types are mismatched. (Difference in brand, rating, or identification is not cause for rejection)

But the the cars with a headlight out, missing muffler, cracked windshield, disabled TPMS system, disconnected sway bar, busted mirror, etc. are OK?
 
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On the drive axle running two different brands for a long time risks wearing out the spider gears in, or overheating, the differential. Even if the two tires are the same nominal diameter, the rolling resistance could differ with the same result. Diffs aren't cheap.

So I wouldn't do what you did. Run two of the same in front and the other two in rear, as others suggest.
 

atikovi

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Even if the two tires are the same nominal diameter, the rolling resistance could differ with the same result.
How so? How would rolling resistance affect the speed of one tire from the other tire? One would have to be skidding for that to happen. Be that as it may, roads are rarely dead straight. The differential is designed to handle much greater speed differences between wheels and this setup is minuscule in comparison.
 
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You did it wrong, were supposed to get the skinniest tires that would mount on the rims, then leave them in front and the tire difference is then because it's a drag racer. ;) Of course you then have to floor it every time you take off from a stop.

Otherwise I don't see the big deal about different tire brands on same side, as they aren't white letter so nobody is going to notice, (besides, aging Jetta not classic or sports car) but as others already mentioned your handling will be better with same model on same *axle*... with aged tires that aren't going to give the best traction in the first place.
 

atikovi

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your handling will be better with same model on same *axle*
Why? Because intuition says they should? Maybe if you're on a racetrack at 9/10ths you will notice a difference. In daily driving, not so much. Drove it around today and never even rolled over once in a curve. You would have no idea if you drove it that the tires were a different brand side to side.
 
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So the problem here is with differing grip levels and handling. Part of the problem is that these problems only show up in emergency maneuvers - just when you don't want them to show up.

A quick test would be to brake severely and see if the car slews to one side. If it does, then you have a problem. If it doesn't, it doesn't mean you don't have a problem. It would take destroying a set of tires to be sure - hardly worth the cost.
 

atikovi

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As I said before, there is no proof that this will cause any issues or that it's unsafe. People just have a gut feeling it is, because they have always been conditioned to believe that identical tires should be on the same axle.

Same theory as, if you damage one shock or or strut on your car, you must replace both even if the other one is perfectly fine. Or if one side of the front brakes are damaged requiring new pads, you must also replace the pads on the other side even when they are like new.
 
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Same theory as, if you damage one shock or or strut on your car, you must replace both even if the other one is perfectly fine. Or if one side of the front brakes are damaged requiring new pads, you must also replace the pads on the other side even when they are like new.
That is my theory, and part of why I buy new cars, and drive them long term, and service them myself. I replace shocks/struts in pairs as well as brake pads. If I can't get the same make tire, in the event of a failure, I replace both.

If you buy a used car, you have to go through it and check for a bunch of jackleg repairs. If I saw a car with mismatched tires , aftermarket wheels, I walk away. Unfortunately , especially in this market not everyone knows and gets taken advantage of.
 
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Nope because there is nothing illegal about it. Show me one state that requires the same brand of tire on the same axle.
That is true, nothing illegal that I am aware of. I've run a different tire on the same axle and inspections in Mass only care about tread depth, suspension condition and emissions. Personally, I like to keep the same tread on the same axle, but I don't think you're going to notice anything bopping around DC.

I will say, you just can't win here at BITOG either. A while back, someone asked if a tire was good. It had 3/32'nds, a crack in the sidewall and I was wrong for recommending a new tire. God forbid, you put different tires of the same size on each side of the vehicle. You're taking your life into your own hands @atikovi .
 
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You just had a tire engineer tell you what the problem with it was... yet you maintains it is all fine...

Penny conscious and pound foolish.

I would also walk from a car with mismatched tires, it is an indicator of other corner cutting and ineptness in repairs.
 

OVERKILL

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You just had a tire engineer tell you what the problem with it was... yet you maintains it is all fine...

Penny conscious and pound foolish.

I would also walk from a car with mismatched tires, it is an indicator of other corner cutting and ineptness in repairs.
Yup, when @CapriRacer speaks, I listen. He knows far more about this subject than the rest of us.
 
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It's fine of course, but you have to consider considering the source of these comments. There are plenty here that would say mixing differnet brands of oil will cause "additive clash" and be very harmful to your motor.
 
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Why? Because intuition says they should? Maybe if you're on a racetrack at 9/10ths you will notice a difference. In daily driving, not so much. Drove it around today and never even rolled over once in a curve. You would have no idea if you drove it that the tires were a different brand side to side.
So all tires are magically equal and I can just buy based on price? That's good to know, except, it's not true.

There are worse things, but then there are better things too, like mounting same on same axle if you need to run different tires at all. It's not like this is even something that would cost money, just a simple choice.
 
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CKN

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You just had a tire engineer tell you what the problem with it was... yet you maintains it is all fine...

Penny conscious and pound foolish.

I would also walk from a car with mismatched tires, it is an indicator of other corner cutting and ineptness in repairs.
This is BITOG.......
 

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It's fine of course, but you have to consider considering the source of these comments. There are plenty here that would say mixing differnet brands of oil will cause "additive clash" and be very harmful to your motor.
I don't recall anyone saying that additive clash would be "very harmful". I do recall mention of potential negative synergies that could reduce the overall effectiveness/performance of the additive package and result in poorer performance than either of the fully formulated products on their own. That's a far cry from "very harmful" and wouldn't be measurable by "Average Joe".

Same with the potential blending of two very different based lubricants where the PPD dose ends up not being correct for the resulting combination, reducing the Winter rating (IE: a couple 5w-30's turning into a 10w-30). Again, Average Joe wouldn't notice this.

The desire to construct strawmen to prop up a behaviour or belief is strong with many on here, and there seems to be a real issue with the liberal use of hyperbole to misconstrue or misconstruct legitimate scientific and tribological critiques of certain practices, where the deference to the "pile of failed engines" defence is the universal backstop, despite nobody making those critiques or presenting those caveats as indicating that would be the result.
 

CKN

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I don't recall anyone saying that additive clash would be "very harmful". I do recall mention of potential negative synergies that could reduce the overall effectiveness/performance of the additive package and result in poorer performance than either of the fully formulated products on their own. That's a far cry from "very harmful" and wouldn't be measurable by "Average Joe".

Same with the potential blending of two very different based lubricants where the PPD dose ends up not being correct for the resulting combination, reducing the Winter rating (IE: a couple 5w-30's turning into a 10w-30). Again, Average Joe wouldn't notice this.

The desire to construct strawmen to prop up a behaviour or belief is strong with many on here, and there seems to be a real issue with the liberal use of hyperbole to misconstrue or misconstruct legitimate scientific and tribological critiques of certain practices, where the deference to the "pile of failed engines" defence is the universal backstop, despite nobody making those critiques or presenting those caveats as indicating that would be the result.
To be fair-it's not only on BITOG. There are many keyboard mechanics, oil engineers, and epidemiologists on "The Net".

But yes-we agree!
 
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I don't recall anyone saying that additive clash would be "very harmful". I do recall mention of potential negative synergies that could reduce the overall effectiveness/performance of the additive package and result in poorer performance than either of the fully formulated products on their own. That's a far cry from "very harmful" and wouldn't be measurable by "Average Joe".

Same with the potential blending of two very different based lubricants where the PPD dose ends up not being correct for the resulting combination, reducing the Winter rating (IE: a couple 5w-30's turning into a 10w-30). Again, Average Joe wouldn't notice this.

The desire to construct strawmen to prop up a behaviour or belief is strong with many on here, and there seems to be a real issue with the liberal use of hyperbole to misconstrue or misconstruct legitimate scientific and tribological critiques of certain practices, where the deference to the "pile of failed engines" defence is the universal backstop, despite nobody making those critiques or presenting those caveats as indicating that would be the result.
yeah yeah. whatever.
 
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