Delo 5w40 replacement

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I am looking for a replacement for Delo 5w40. I've been using it for over 15 years in ATVs, motorcycles, and other small engines (lawnmowers, snowblowers, generators, etc). Unfortunately, it has proven to be impossible to find locally right now, and I am essentially out. I cannot run a 15w as I will see temps of -30°F or colder during winter, and the ATVs generators, and snowblowers will all be used at those temps. The oil must be wet clutch compatible (motorcycles and ATVs both have wet clutches), suitable for a combined sump (motorcycle) and flat tappet cams. Ideally, it would also be a HDEO that would be suitable in ISB, 7.3 and 6.0 PS engines. I have not been impressed with Rotella in a HEUI injection systems. The bikes also didn't shift as well on Rotella as they do on the Delo.

Yes, I could stock different oils for each application. However, when I am maintaining over 50 pieces of equipment, having a "one size fits most" oil that I can change once a year is nice. Price is a concern as well, but not the end-all, I'd rather pay under $40 a gallon if possible, $65 a gallon is out of the question.

I've looked at the JASO list for 0w and 5w MA and MA1, nothing has really jumped out at me as being readily available locally. However, neither the Delo or Rotella are MA listed, despite the fact that both are well documented as performing well in these applications.
 

wwillson

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We have the same oil wish for the machinery back home. One oil to run in winter and summer, gas or diesel. The oil has to be trusted with very expensive engines. We don't lease, instead own everything, so longevity is paramount in engines that work extremely hard for most of their life. Machinery that sits outside and has to start every day without fail.

We have been running HPL cold climate 15w-40, which flows like a 5w-40. This is the only engine oil I've ever seen that doesn't cloud at -30°F and will flow right out of the container. The difference in cold cranking with this 15w-40 vs other 15w-40s or even 5w-40s is night and day. They also make a 0w-30 cold climate, but most of our engines call for 40wt. We've found the 15w-40 cold climate to be an outstanding year around oil. Wishes do come true.
 
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I was at WM a couple days ago, it seems Delo is back on the shelf.
At least around here.
There were not too many choices on the WM closest to me, though Delo is there.
 
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I wonder how Schaeffer 5w40 would work for you? With the quantity you probably need you can get free shipping. I've never used it in something with wet clutches so that would be my only concern. I have used it extensively in gas engines as well as diesel as it was intended.
 

ZeeOSix

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We have been running HPL cold climate 15w-40, which flows like a 5w-40. This is the only engine oil I've ever seen that doesn't cloud at -30°F and will flow right out of the container. The difference in cold cranking with this 15w-40 vs other 15w-40s or even 5w-40s is night and day.
Curious on why HPL would rate it as a 15W if it actually flows like a 5W ... ?? The W rating is based on the CC and MRV viscosity so seems there's a reason it ended up being rated as a 15W.
 

ZeeOSix

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The CCS and MRV line up with a 15w on our 15w40 cold climate oil. The pour point of the 15w40 cold climate and our 5w40 cold climate oils end up being the same. Both of these are primarily PAO.

David
The CCS and MRV performance, and the resulting W rating is what will determine cold starting performace - that's what the W rating is suppose to determine. Pour point isn't really a good measure of cold starting performance from what has been discussed in other threads - seems to be a disconnect there if it flows well under gravity, but shows to come in as a 15W when CCS and MRV tested. Anything you can add about that would be helpful - thanks.
 
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I am looking for a replacement for Delo 5w40. I've been using it for over 15 years in ATVs, motorcycles, and other small
Yes, I could stock different oils for each application. However, when I am maintaining over 50 pieces of equipment, having a "one size fits most" oil that I can change once a year is nice.

I looked and discovered the oil with the widest possible temperature range in your case with the most availability for usually the best price is a major brand 5w30 synthetic... It's got you covered from -30F to +95F... granted it's not a 40 but it's possible the"one size fits most" oil you're looking for...

ViscosityvTemp4.gif
 
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The CCS and MRV line up with a 15w on our 15w40 cold climate oil. The pour point of the 15w40 cold climate and our 5w40 cold climate oils end up being the same. Both of these are primarily PAO.

David

Speaking of Cold Cranking Simulation... the simulated pour difference between the the W should look like this... so it's probably why the OP is looking solely for a 0W or 5W...

UsedOilFlowTest5.jpg
 
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ZeeOSix

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Speaking of Cold Cranking Simulation... the simulated pour difference between the the W should look like this... so it's probably why the OP is looking solely for a 0W or 5W...

1667954720990.png
If you read post #9, there is typically a disconnect between the pour point (and a gravity kinematic viscosity pour "test" like that) and the CCS (cold cranking dynamic viscosity) and MRV (pumpability dynamic viscosity) tested viscosity. The SAE "W" rating is based on the CCS and MRV test viscosity and not the pour point temperature for a reason.
 
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The CCS and MRV performance, and the resulting W rating is what will determine cold starting performace - that's what the W rating is suppose to determine. Pour point isn't really a good measure of cold starting performance from what has been discussed in other threads - seems to be a disconnect there if it flows well under gravity, but shows to come in as a 15W when CCS and MRV tested. Anything you can add about that would be helpful - thanks.
I’ll try to say it a different way. We make 3 cold climate oils. Two of them are 5w40 and 15w40. These oils both adhere to SAE J300 for CCS and MRV for their respective 5w and 15w. The irony is even though they both adhere to J300 the pour points are ironically the same. Agreed pour point is not part of J300. We run it on our oils anyway. I mentioned these are both primarily PAO which is why I feel the base stocks are driving the similar pour points. The advantage for Wayne is for his farm equipment, he can use a PAO based 15w40 year around and take advantage of the benefit of better cold weather performance from the better base stock. His green equipment will be better off when starting in the winter because of the PAO.

We have all the equipment for SAE J300 in our lab and measure each of the oils we make.

The 5w will still be more fluid. There is no question about that.

David
 

ZeeOSix

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I’ll try to say it a different way. We make 3 cold climate oils. Two of them are 5w40 and 15w40. These oils both adhere to SAE J300 for CCS and MRV for their respective 5w and 15w. The irony is even though they both adhere to J300 the pour points are ironically the same. Agreed pour point is not part of J300. We run it on our oils anyway. I mentioned these are both primarily PAO which is why I feel the base stocks are driving the similar pour points. The advantage for Wayne is for his farm equipment, he can use a PAO based 15w40 year around and take advantage of the benefit of better cold weather performance from the better base stock. His green equipment will be better off when starting in the winter because of the PAO.

We have all the equipment for SAE J300 in our lab and measure each of the oils we make.

The 5w will still be more fluid. There is no question about that.

David
Thanks for the input. If they both have the same pour point, but one is rated as a 5W and the other as a 15W per the SAE CCS and MRV tests, then I would think that the 5W would allow better cold starting and pumpability at very cold temperatures in real use in the field than the 15W. If you had two identical snow blowers, one with the 5W-40 and one with the 15W-40, I'd expect the one with the 5W to start easier and pump better at say -20F than the one with the 15W. That's what the W rating is suppose to represent, regardless of pour point. This is why the "cold oil flow races" done by Project Farm are misleading, which has been pointed out and discussed in many threads.
 
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Thanks for the input. If they both have the same pour point, but one is rated as a 5W and the other as a 15W per the SAE CCS and MRV tests, then I would think that the 5W would allow better cold starting and pumpability at very cold temperatures in real use in the field than the 15W. If you had two identical snow blowers, one with the 5W-40 and one with the 15W-40, I'd expect the one with the 5W to start easier and pump better at say -20F than the one with the 15W. That's what the W rating is suppose to represent, regardless of pour point. This is why the "cold oil flow races" done by Project Farm are misleading, which has been pointed out and discussed in many threads.
This is true and I have not implied anything different.
 

ZeeOSix

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This is true and I have not implied anything different.
Nor have I implied anything different. But the take away is that an oil with a 5W rating should have better cold weather starting performance than a 15W, regardless of what the pour point is, or what the base oil it's made from, or how it does in a kinematic oil flow "race". If the CCS and MRV dynamic viscosity are less at -xx degrees C, then it should perform better at that cold temperature. Your 5W-40 cold oil formula should perform better in cold weather than your 15W-40, just like any other oil when comparing the W rating. The whole point of the CCS and MRV test is to give an oil a W rating that doesn't care what the base oil is, only what the dynamic viscosity of the finished product is to determine cold cranking and pumablility performance. If those tests don't really do that, then I guess SAE better rethink the W rating.
 
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