Damaged Rhino Ramps

Messages
167
Location
NE Pennsylvania
I have a set of 12,000 lb. rated Rhino ramps that are slightly damaged. I have a modified stone driveway (gravel mixed with a little bit of dirt for better compaction). My theory is that one of the larger stones must have been forced up against one of the plastic divider pieces under the bottom of one of the ramps. Anyhow, one of these divider pieces in the grid-shaped bottom is cracked about three-quarters of the way through. My first question is, could I replace just one ramp, or must I buy a new set? I guess I should call Blitz Mfg. who I believe are the manufacturers. I am concerned that even if I replace the ramps, I will run into the same problem. Would it be better to use two pieces of plywood on the ground before setting the ramps in place? Is there some potential problem with this solution? Would it be better to replace the ramps with a jack and jackstand set-up instead, or would these be worse off on a (fairly well compacted) gravel driveway. Lastly, how much does asphalt cost? [Big Grin]
 
Messages
3,558
Location
SE Pa
Don't use that ramp. Contact Blitz for a replacement. I understand they are good to deal with. Unless I have to get at the brakes or suspension components, I prefer ramps over jacks/stands where a full lift is not required. But I wouldn't use those hollow Rhinos (or any ramp for that matter) on a loose fill surface. Plywood is ok, but concrete or macadam is better.
 
Messages
8,711
Location
Nothern USA
The sturdy wood ones I built for my Grand Am might be OK on gravel. Just an oak 2 x 8 and some 4 x 6 blocks. They fit under the air dam, and raised it enough for me to fit under.
 
Messages
21
Location
Oak Ridge, TN
If you do much work on your cars, you might consider pouring a slab just big enough to accomodate a set of ramps/jack/jackstands. That certainly would be safer than using any of the above on loose fill! Go by Home Depot for advice. A small slab (or two, depending on how you design it)should be a not too difficult DIY project and will last a life time. Allen
 

Thorn

Thread starter
Messages
167
Location
NE Pennsylvania
So is there any relatively safe way to lift a vehicle on a surface other than concrete or asphalt (macadam)? I suspect that this area has been a driveway for decades (I've only lived in the house for ~6 years). Therefore, it is compacted really well, and it is not exactly "loose". Imagine a well-used unpaved road that is really pretty solid - that's sort of what the driveway is like. It is not loose gravel. Even in very heavy rain, the ground here does not become unstable.
 
Messages
53
Location
Florida
For the $30 it cost for a new set I would not take the chance. Just get a new set and put some plywood under them next time.
 
Messages
1,841
Location
United We Stand
I've cracked a set "meaning both ramps" way worse then that and they still work fine. FYI rear drive cars/trucks can and will push a set of ramps right across a concrete slab with out some rubber for grip. You name it I've probably done it to a set of Rhino's. On a compacted drive way you are fine with a set of ramps. My 8k ramps still hold my F150 fine as cracked up as they are I wouldn't loose any sleep. You can also use jack stands on compacted ground, just cut some 3/4in. ply wood or sub-flooring for under each jack stand. Actaully that works on any kind of ground and the shoulder of the road in a pinch.
 
Messages
3,558
Location
SE Pa
quote:
Originally posted by Thorn: So is there any relatively safe way to lift a vehicle on a surface other than concrete or asphalt (macadam)? I suspect that this area has been a driveway for decades (I've only lived in the house for ~6 years). Therefore, it is compacted really well, and it is not exactly "loose". Imagine a well-used unpaved road that is really pretty solid - that's sort of what the driveway is like. It is not loose gravel. Even in very heavy rain, the ground here does not become unstable.
Yes. Lay down sheets of steel, thicker plywood, or some other material to distribute the load over a wider area. But the right way is a well built concrete or macadam pad. The problem with ramps and many jacks and jack stands is that they concentrate the load over a very small surface area. The PSI loads placed at the contact points is sufficiently high to break or cut through lesser materials, such as loose fill and topsoil. The base of one of those Rhinos is probably only a couple of square inches, and in the form of 1/8-1/4 inch blades. You do the math. But it's your driveway, your car, your ramps . . . and your safety. You do what you want.
 

Al

Messages
19,248
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
I would be reluctant to tell you there is no problem without seeing it. But I have the 12,000 lb. ones and also the 6,000# ones and I find it hard to believe that there would be any measurable loss of strength. The 6000 lb. ones have far less webbing. I'll bet the damaged one will support 12,000 pounds by itself. But as mentioned..I bet they will replace it.
 
Messages
369
Location
midwest
Use ramps anyday...forget about jacks. It will be a cold day in **** before I crawl under a car propped up on jacks. A VERY cold one at that!!!
 
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