Conventional 15-40 base oil question

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11
Location
Vic, Australia
Group II - the API CK-4 sulfur limit would stop you from blending with high proportion of group I as the additive package contributes most of the 4,000ppm maximum sulfur limit. Typically it would be 3,600-3,800ppm sulfur from the detergent (calcium sulfonate/magnesium sulfonate) and anti-wear package (ZDDP which contains sulfur).

In any case, Global group I availability is becoming less as refineries produce products such as Group II, II+, III, III+ to help meet the higher demands of the more modern oil specifications.

If you call Group III (hydrocracked) conventional then it would be Group II and Group III. In many parts of the world Group III is called synthetic.
 
Messages
246
Location
Iowa
Group II - the API CK-4 sulfur limit would stop you from blending with high proportion of group I as the additive package contributes most of the 4,000ppm maximum sulfur limit. Typically it would be 3,600-3,800ppm sulfur from the detergent (calcium sulfonate/magnesium sulfonate) and anti-wear package (ZDDP which contains sulfur).

In any case, Global group I availability is becoming less as refineries produce products such as Group II, II+, III, III+ to help meet the higher demands of the more modern oil specifications.

If you call Group III (hydrocracked) conventional then it would be Group II and Group III. In many parts of the world Group III is called synthetic.

Just curious... Is this why oils like Mobil Delvac 1300 are now semi-synthetic? It was conventional for a long time.
 

Loneryder48

Thread starter
Messages
124
Group II - the API CK-4 sulfur limit would stop you from blending with high proportion of group I as the additive package contributes most of the 4,000ppm maximum sulfur limit. Typically it would be 3,600-3,800ppm sulfur from the detergent (calcium sulfonate/magnesium sulfonate) and anti-wear package (ZDDP which contains sulfur).

In any case, Global group I availability is becoming less as refineries produce products such as Group II, II+, III, III+ to help meet the higher demands of the more modern oil specifications.

If you call Group III (hydrocracked) conventional then it would be Group II and Group III. In many parts of the world Group III is called synthetic.
Thanks for that answer. Makes sense.
 
Messages
5,291
Location
Paramount, California
Group II.

Technically there is no difference between Group II and Group III, other than an arbitrarily set viscosity index (VI) limit, with VI ≤ 119 called Group II and VI ≥ 120 called Group III. They are both made through the identical hydroprocessing (hydrogenation) process in the same facility with the same equipment, which includes hydrocracking, hydroisomerization, hydrofinishing, etc., the only difference being the severity of the process, which determines the VI. For the same reason, a Group III base stock with VI = 120 is significantly inferior to a Group III base stock with VI = 140.
 
Messages
172
Location
Brazil
What is the chance that a conventional HDEO that is only API SL , E7 , CI-4, be a Grp II?

Is there a spec that could give me a hint it is II and not I ?
 
Messages
10
Location
Karachi, Pakistan
If you're asking about Rimula R4X i am quite sure it is Group 1, or at least i recall reading something about it on oil-club.ru.
It's an old school HDEO.

Interesting...yet it’s CI4. Here in Pakistan were able to get it in 15w40 and 20w50 flavors. Planning on filling my Kubota v2203 genset with the thicker grade since we spend much of the year well over 75F.
 
Messages
172
Location
Brazil
If you're asking about Rimula R4X i am quite sure it is Group 1, or at least i recall reading something about it on oil-club.ru.
It's an old school HDEO.

Thanks FCD

The R4x is on the market for quite some time, so i believe the formula may have changed over the years.

Not only the Rimula, but i would like to know if there is any hint a HDEO could be Grp II, so i can look for them.
 
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