Comparison between TireRack and CR tire ratings

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Somewhere in the US
CapriRacer said:
But Tire Rack has a problem. they can't pump enough water onto their test pads to really test hydroplaning resistance.
[citation needed]

Admittedly, this is anecdotal:

As some of you are aware. I used to work for a major tire manufacturer. Shortly after Tire Rack installed their wet pad, we got the results of one of their tests - and the results were different than ours. We asked some questions and our test folks concluded that Tire Rack's water film was thinner than ours. We told them of our findings and they said they couldn't pump more water, and they were satisfied with the conditions.
 
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203
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Northern Michigan
Admittedly, this is anecdotal:

As some of you are aware. I used to work for a major tire manufacturer. Shortly after Tire Rack installed their wet pad, we got the results of one of their tests - and the results were different than ours. We asked some questions and our test folks concluded that Tire Rack's water film was thinner than ours. We told them of our findings and they said they couldn't pump more water, and they were satisfied with the conditions.
Thanks for sharing this,
So is there a National (or International) that specifies how this test is to be performed... or do the various tire manufacturers and sellers (like CR and Tire Rack) have their own way of doing it.
 
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3,980
Location
Somewhere in the US
So is there a National (or International) that specifies how this test is to be performed... or do the various tire manufacturers and sellers (like CR and Tire Rack) have their own way of doing it.

Well, there are standardized tests, but one of the biggest problems is the road surface itself. Road surfaces are so different - particularly in the different parts of the world (and even within smallish areas - say the same county!) that it is extremely difficult to duplicate results.

Worse, the tread compounds will interact with the macrotexture of the road surface such that there can be reversals. That is, test on one surface and you get a rank order, but test on a different surface and get a different order.

As a result, most specifications for traction, reference a single location where ALL tests have to be performed. In the case of the UTQG traction rating test, that surface is in San Angelo, Texas. It is monitored using an SRTT (Standard Reference Test Tire) - a former Uniroyal design, now supplied by Michelin from certified materials.

SAE has a series of standardized tests, but, again, the results will vary according to road surface.

There is a mixed bag of tests that are performed - and what tests are run and how much credence is given depends on who is evaluating the results.

The good news is the truly great traction compounds will always rank high, and truly poor traction compounds will always rank low - it's that the order might be different depending on what test is run and where it is run.
 
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12,750
Location
Colorado Springs
Well, there are standardized tests, but one of the biggest problems is the road surface itself. Road surfaces are so different - particularly in the different parts of the world (and even within smallish areas - say the same county!) that it is extremely difficult to duplicate results.

Worse, the tread compounds will interact with the macrotexture of the road surface such that there can be reversals. That is, test on one surface and you get a rank order, but test on a different surface and get a different order.

As a result, most specifications for traction, reference a single location where ALL tests have to be performed. In the case of the UTQG traction rating test, that surface is in San Angelo, Texas. It is monitored using an SRTT (Standard Reference Test Tire) - a former Uniroyal design, now supplied by Michelin from certified materials.

SAE has a series of standardized tests, but, again, the results will vary according to road surface.

There is a mixed bag of tests that are performed - and what tests are run and how much credence is given depends on who is evaluating the results.

The good news is the truly great traction compounds will always rank high, and truly poor traction compounds will always rank low - it's that the order might be different depending on what test is run and where it is run.
Most inconsistent surface is here in the US. States have much more say over construction of interstates than similar roads in other developed countries where there is more centralization of political power. Even in the states, interstates vary as local politics is pushing local suppliers.
I59 through Alabama, from Birmingham to Chattanooga, TN is perfect example. Road surface changes as one goes through different counties.
 
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Chicagoland
Most inconsistent surface is here in the US. States have much more say over construction of interstates than similar roads in other developed countries where there is more centralization of political power. Even in the states, interstates vary as local politics is pushing local suppliers.
I59 through Alabama, from Birmingham to Chattanooga, TN is perfect example. Road surface changes as one goes through different counties.

Different counties? We have different surfaces depending on the lane!
 
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197
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DFW Metroplex
In the case of the UTQG traction rating test, that surface is in San Angelo, Texas. It is monitored using an SRTT (Standard Reference Test Tire) - a former Uniroyal design, now supplied by Michelin from certified materials.

I drive by that place every now and again. It’s quite impressive to see, even from the outside like I am. I’d love to take a few laps on their course there, too bad they don’t rent it out on the weekends to local folks to test out their own suspension upgrades. :cool:
 
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3,121
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Northeast
We've had 2 set(4 tires) of AltiMAX RT43.
2001 Lexus RX300 AWD(225-70-16) in "T" speed rating
2015 Honda Civic LX (195-65-15) in "H" speed rating
These mentioned speed ratings^^^ is what their respective vehicles stated on their door jamb so this is what I bought. Both cars came(OE) with soft riding tires, again, in their respective speed ratings.

I was a bit concerned with the RT43 in "H" speed rating on the Civic as I thought it may have made the car's ride too firm/harsh compared to the OE but, that was not the case. It rides just fine and this Civic LX is a nice riding/quiet compact sedan.

We love the RT43s on both cars and recommend them to many here at Bob's and on the outside to friends & family. My SIL, per my recommendation, put the RT43 on her 2014 GMC Terrain 2.4L(4cyl) AWD(235-60-17 "H" speed rating) and love's them as well.

As a consumer, we like the RT43s for their overall-ness/everyday-ness in the good things these tires do well. Which is just about everything, without(really) doing anything poorly. I mean, they're not a performance tire but, they're nice performing without calling attention to themselves.


There's a difference in the siping of the T and H . I believe the H also has a thicker sidewall than the T .
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57
Location
Pretoria, SA
Was randomly checking TireRack and came across their Rating chart. Consumer Report's latest tire chart is Here. Consumer Report tested T-rated tires, so my first question is, can one extrapolate T-rated tire ratings to H-rated tires?

You’re comparing apples with oranges.

Tire Rack does performance tests with skilled drivers driving high performance vehicles with the auto enthusiast in mind. It does not do long-range testing, or test wear.

Consumer Reports tests tires on its fleet of test vehicles, and does instrumented tests on its own test track, with a view to an ordinary driver with an emphasis on tire wear rather than performance at the limits.

The H vs T rating issue has been a topic of controversy. Some tire dealers claim that replacing H-rated tires with T-rated tires is dangerous. The major difference appears to be that T-rated tires last longer since in general.


My impression is that if two tires of the same make and model share the same tread pattern and design but one is T (118 mph) rated and the other H (130 mph) rated, in most driving by most people there is not a detectable difference.
 
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1,545
Location
iowa
After installing, and recommending tires for over 18 years now, I long ago came to the conclusion that picking the perfect tire is like trying to buy the perfect pair of shoes for someone else. You might love them, and the look for your feet, but everybody's foot, and perception is different! Tire surveys, and what anybody says, is only a guide. I think traction for the conditions is most important.
 
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