Comparison between TireRack and CR tire ratings

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I am pretty much settled on RT43 H-rated 225/60R17 for 2015 Forester. I am just waiting if any deal shows up on these tires. I have until Sept.

Was randomly checking TireRack and came across their Rating chart. Consumer Report's latest tire chart is Here. Consumer Report tested T-rated tires, so my first question is, can one extrapolate T-rated tire ratings to H-rated tires?
There is another rating chart for Performance all-seasons but they are all V-rated. So I ignored that.

RT43 sits at the top on CR testing but sits down the list on TireRack's ratings. I believe TireRack ratings are user-submitted but they also have some testing data with RT43s, Here.

When you compare the TireRack tested ratings and CR ratings, they don't match. For e.g. BFGoodrich Advantage T/A, CR claims its best at hydroplaning resistance (its the only one in the whole list) whereas TireRack's spider chart says otherwise.

Why such a difference? Any idea? Or am I misunderstanding?

Thanks in advance.

(P.S. - This question is out of curiosity. I am not exactly looking for 'just get RT43s and be done with it' kind of answer.)
 
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The Tire Rack conducts their own test on tires, but doesn't test for wear. They give professional driver input usually against 2-3 other tires in the same category. I put more faith in the Tire Rack and I'm a subscriber to CU.
 
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When you compare the TireRack tested ratings and CR ratings, they don't match. For e.g. BFGoodrich Advantage T/A, CR claims its best at hydroplaning resistance (its the only one in the whole list) whereas TireRack's spider chart says otherwise.

"Hydroplaning resistance" is a pretty one-dimensional test: Can the tire pump enough water out from under it to keep it in contact with the surface.

Tire Rack's tests are much more nuanced. They don't test in water deep enough to cause hydroplaning. Their wet tests use enough water to lower the friction co-efficient to determine the handling characteristics of the tire, not swamp the tire to the point of hydroplaning.
 
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tests + opinions aside continue to shop + price what you decide on, lots of deals come + go + internet searches have their favorites $$$$
 
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Then is it safe to assume that the ratings for T-rated tires can not be extrapolated for H-rated tires?
They could. First of all, structural integrity of tire is not determined by speed index, but by load index. As long as you are using tire that has same load index, or higher, you are good.
Speed rating means tire will operate safely as long as that speed is not breached for certain period of time. Considering T rated is 112mph, you are on safe ground. Do not forget, that speed index is coupled with appropriate load index.
Now, there is subtle differences in compound etc. Even same speed index rating but different sizes could give you different test results, but not by a lot.
 
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"Hydroplaning resistance" is a pretty one-dimensional test: Can the tire pump enough water out from under it to keep it in contact with the surface.

Tire Rack's tests are much more nuanced. They don't test in water deep enough to cause hydroplaning. Their wet tests use enough water to lower the friction co-efficient to determine the handling characteristics of the tire, not swamp the tire to the point of hydroplaning.
People pay too much attention on hydroplaning. Tire could be good in hydroplaning but horrible in wet handling and braking. I had tires like that, came with a car. Excellent in hydroplaning, but braking and handling? Absolute disaster.
 
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I think I need to step in here to clear up some misconceptions.

First, the load carrying capacity (Load Index) is set by the tire standardizing organizations. Barry's Tire Tech: Load Tables What you should get from the link is that while there are many tire standardizing organizations, for practical purposes, the load index is the same for a given tire size - and it is the tire manufacturers responsibility to build a tire that meets or exceeds those standards.

But Speed Rating does indeed impact load carrying capability in that the casing is less prone to failure - both for speed and load - BUT - because the load index is set by the tire standardizing organizations, that is NOT apparent. The only way you could find out is by testing the tire! You will get a better result on the load tests.

Is there a difference between a T rated and an H rated tire as far as overall performance is concerned? If they have the same UTQG treadwear and traction rating, The tire will perform the same except for it durability (meaning résistance to structural failure) Please note the UTQG temperature rating is a form of the speed rating.

If you want I can go into more detail about how tire manufacturers deal with speed tests and load tests.
 
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I am making this a separate post to deal with the difference between Tire Rack test results and Consumer Reports test results.

First, tires are a compromise and every testing outfit has their own ideas of what's important and what's not.

In the case of CR, they like long wearing, inexpensive, high wet and snow traction.

Tire rack prefers good handling tires. But Tire Rack has a problem. they can't pump enough water onto their test pads to really test hydroplaning resistance. What they wind up testing more closely resembles dry traction.
 
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I am making this a separate post to deal with the difference between Tire Rack test results and Consumer Reports test results.

First, tires are a compromise and every testing outfit has their own ideas of what's important and what's not.

In the case of CR, they like long wearing, inexpensive, high wet and snow traction.

Tire rack prefers good handling tires. But Tire Rack has a problem. they can't pump enough water onto their test pads to really test hydroplaning resistance. What they wind up testing more closely resembles dry traction.
I never knew they have issue with pumping enough water.
I personally do not pay too much attention to CR, and selectively take TR info. More attention I would pay to ADAC if tire was tested by them.
 
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I don’t put a whole lot of value in Consumer Reports or Tire Rack. Tire Rack does come a little closer to real world tire characteristics. UTQG ratings stamped on the side of the tire and load index are what I look at when buying tires. Those details served me well on my last two sets of tires. One set was Goodyear Eagle Sports for a 2013 KIA Optima and the other were Hankook Ventus S1 Noble 2 on a 2017 Ford Escape. Both tires had excellent resistance to hydroplaning.
 
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Is there a difference between a T rated and an H rated tire as far as overall performance is concerned? If they have the same UTQG treadwear and traction rating, The tire will perform the same except for it durability (meaning résistance to structural failure) Please note the UTQG temperature rating is a form of the speed rating.

Will a H rated tire stand up to pot hole damage better than the T?
 
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When I visited CR test facility they said that they had to repave the wet/hydroplaning circuit as it was draining too fast and water was not deep enough.
TR may have too well shaped circuit to hold enough water (5 or 8 mm not sure what standard calls for).

Krzys
 
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People pay too much attention on hydroplaning. Tire could be good in hydroplaning but horrible in wet handling and braking. I had tires like that, came with a car. Excellent in hydroplaning, but braking and handling? Absolute disaster.
Yep. The Bridgestones on my old Caliber would never hydroplane, but were otherwise miserable in the rain.

TR’s own test results have always pretty much mirrored my own experiences. I don’t pay much attention to the consumer reviews, as my definition of “loud” or “wore out very quickly” is entirely different from someone else’s.
 
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I use TR & CR tire ratings as a guideline, not as gospel, when buying tires. I look for tires that fit my criteria down to a "T"(no pun) or as close to checking off the most boxes in my criteria.

We've had 2 set(4 tires) of AltiMAX RT43.
2001 Lexus RX300 AWD(225-70-16) in "T" speed rating
2015 Honda Civic LX (195-65-15) in "H" speed rating
These mentioned speed ratings^^^ is what their respective vehicles stated on their door jamb so this is what I bought. Both cars came(OE) with soft riding tires, again, in their respective speed ratings.

I was a bit concerned with the RT43 in "H" speed rating on the Civic as I thought it may have made the car's ride too firm/harsh compared to the OE but, that was not the case. It rides just fine and this Civic LX is a nice riding/quiet compact sedan.

We love the RT43s on both cars and recommend them to many here at Bob's and on the outside to friends & family. My SIL, per my recommendation, put the RT43 on her 2014 GMC Terrain 2.4L(4cyl) AWD(235-60-17 "H" speed rating) and love's them as well.

As a consumer, we like the RT43s for their overall-ness/everyday-ness in the good things these tires do well. Which is just about everything, without(really) doing anything poorly. I mean, they're not a performance tire but, they're nice performing without calling attention to themselves.
 
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