Cleaning albums with wood glue?

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Originally Posted by aquariuscsm
What's the best type of stylus? Conical or elliptical? I have an elliptical JICO Shure clone in my Shure R1000 cartridge.
JICO can be much better than SHURE O.E., sounds like a decent combo. Though I am not familiar with the R1000 coils and pole pieces. Sounds like a Radio Shack Rebrand of a M75ED. Depends on your TT and what you are doing with it and expecting from it. For involved listening a 3x7 mill NUDE elliptical Diamond on a low mass, stiff canteliver would do the trick if set up well. To go to a severe Line contact i.e; Pramanik or Shibata or Van Den Hull would require and advanced, solid and very adjustable tonearm for SRA and Azimuth for every record. Good for archiving or Showing off to your friends what a madman you are smile b&o made some stupendous sounding moving iron cross (mmc) miniaturised cartridges. They sound much like a Studer R-to-R Master copy playback. No 7-10 khz rise and sizzle here. My buddy Jim owns two MMC-1 - with drilled ruby cantilever. He's a b&o fanatic. ______ I went from a Pickering 625E to a b&0 on my first "real" TT a Pioneer PL12D in the 70's That b&0 SP12 was an ear opener - even played through a garbage, but "new" Yamaha 610 II Integrated Amp. I use a nice Conical on a v-15 moving iron for vintage 45 playback or well worn records. [Linked Image]
 
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Originally Posted by aquariuscsm
Anyone remember when records from the 80s always had this sticker on them haha! [Linked Image]
Sure do!
 
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Dec 30, 2006
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Originally Posted by ARCOgraphite
Originally Posted by aquariuscsm
What's the best type of stylus? Conical or elliptical? I have an elliptical JICO Shure clone in my Shure R1000 cartridge.
JICO can be much better than SHURE O.E., sounds like a decent combo. Though I am not familiar with the R1000 coils and pole pieces. Sounds like a Radio Shack Rebrand of a M75ED. Depends on your TT and what you are doing with it and expecting from it. For involved listening a 3x7 mill NUDE elliptical Diamond on a low mass, stiff canteliver would do the trick if set up well. To go to a severe Line contact i.e; Pramanik or Shibata or Van Den Hull would require and advanced, solid and very adjustable tonearm for SRA and Azimuth for every record. Good for archiving or Showing off to your friends what a madman you are smile b&o made some stupendous sounding moving iron cross (mmc) miniaturised cartridges. They sound much like a Studer R-to-R Master copy playback. No 7-10 khz rise and sizzle here. My buddy Jim owns two MMC-1 - with drilled ruby cantilever. He's a b&o fanatic. ______ I went from a Pickering 625E to a b&0 on my first "real" TT a Pioneer PL12D in the 70's That b&0 SP12 was an ear opener - even played through a garbage, but "new" Yamaha 610 II Integrated Amp. I use a nice Conical on a v-15 moving iron for vintage 45 playback or well worn records. [Linked Image]
My current turntable is a Realistic LAB-440 (that's the one with the Shure cartridge). I also have a Hitachi turntable from around 1983 that has an Audio Technica. I can't remember the model,I'll have to dig it out. I remember the Audio Technica has crisper highs, but the Shure seems to track older records (1960s rock) better.
 
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I have cleaned many vinyl albums with glue. Get Aleene's glue in the WalMart craft department. It is PVA glue. I thin it with a little distilled water. Make a "daisy" of glue on one side of the record and, with a light paper or plastic card, spread it evenly over the surface. Don't get it on the label as it will ruin it. When the glue dries clear, adhere a piece of Scotch tape, like a short spoke, protruding from the edge. With a quick pull, the glue will start to come off. Pull it all off (usually one piece). If there any little bits of glue around, especially the lead in groove, use more tape to pull them off. Do the other side the same way. This process takes a lot of time, but it is like a facial for vinyl. I also think the PVA is so like the vinyl that it "refreshes" the vinyl. I had a half speed mastered Joni Mitchell album that was so noisy I didn't play it. For some reason, I kept it. A glue treatment literally made it like new. Now if you have an old album made with regrind vinyl (they recycled records that didn't sell, grinding label and all), the glue probably won't cure it. Likewise a severely damaged surface is just going to be a clean severely damaged surface. PVA glue is also used in woodworking, but I don't remember the particular brand. Pulling the glue off also makes one heck of a static charge. I use a Zerostat to reduce this quickly, but it will dissipate with time. Higher humidity helps. Practice on an old album and you will quickly get the hang of it. I save this process for the albums that won't Spin-Clean.
 
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
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Originally Posted by jennings
I have cleaned many vinyl albums with glue. Get Aleene's glue in the WalMart craft department. It is PVA glue. I thin it with a little distilled water. Make a "daisy" of glue on one side of the record and, with a light paper or plastic card, spread it evenly over the surface. Don't get it on the label as it will ruin it. When the glue dries clear, adhere a piece of Scotch tape, like a short spoke, protruding from the edge. With a quick pull, the glue will start to come off. Pull it all off (usually one piece). If there any little bits of glue around, especially the lead in groove, use more tape to pull them off. Do the other side the same way. This process takes a lot of time, but it is like a facial for vinyl. I also think the PVA is so like the vinyl that it "refreshes" the vinyl. I had a half speed mastered Joni Mitchell album that was so noisy I didn't play it. For some reason, I kept it. A glue treatment literally made it like new. Now if you have an old album made with regrind vinyl (they recycled records that didn't sell, grinding label and all), the glue probably won't cure it. Likewise a severely damaged surface is just going to be a clean severely damaged surface. PVA glue is also used in woodworking, but I don't remember the particular brand. Pulling the glue off also makes one heck of a static charge. I use a Zerostat to reduce this quickly, but it will dissipate with time. Higher humidity helps. Practice on an old album and you will quickly get the hang of it. I save this process for the albums that won't Spin-Clean.
I've bought a few records (mid 60s rock) that look like new old stock,but play hissy or distorted. I always wrote them off as being a bad press. We're these perhaps made from recycled records?
 
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