Canadian question

driven2services

Administrator
Messages
0
You Canadians...Does your gasoline still contain lead? Does this pose any concerns regarding the oil you use, synthetics in particular? I've heard that it does, but I'm not sure at all of the credibility of that message. Ken
 

Patman

Staff member
Messages
21,988
Location
Oakville, Ontario
No, we cannot get leaded fuel up here at all. As a matter of fact, a few years ago they even outlawed leaded race fuels! So you can only buy unleaded race fuel, although they do have as high as 114 octane in that. I believe it was the early 90s when that came into effect. Our fuel does have a lot of sulfur in it though, as well as MMT.
 
Messages
13
Location
Guelph Ontario Canada
I don't know about a lot of sulfur. We have similar sulfur amounts in our gasoline and diesel as does the states. http://www.sunoco.ca/content.asp?id=125 Sunoco canada's sulfur ratings for gasoline. http://www.sunoco.ca/content.asp?id=34 Sunoco canada's sulfur ratings for diesel. There is a refinery out east whose name escapes me now who is already shipping Ultra low sulfur diesel. This is the 15 ppm limit diesel that will be mandatory in both canada and the states in a few years. They also sell ultra low sulfur gasoline. So frankly we are doing pretty good. Gasoline wise, we do pretty good. The folk in the south however do get to enjoy better diesel then we do. Higher cetane values and lubricity values...but this also has a lot to do with the warmer weather you folk get to enjoy too.
 

Patman

Staff member
Messages
21,988
Location
Oakville, Ontario
Esso gas up here shows the most sulfur. My last oil analysis showed 54 on the sulfur (not sure if Terry's analysis for sulfur is a percentage or in ppm though) I use Esso gas almost exclusively (I only use Sunoco 94 when drag racing) [ September 03, 2002, 05:46 AM: Message edited by: Patman ]
 
Messages
3,845
Scale is 0-199 for soot,oxidation,nitration,and sulfur on Dyson Analysis tests. Divide by 2 for approximate percentage for comparison to other tests.
 
Messages
1,874
Location
Ocala, Florida
quote:
Originally posted by dcormann: The folk in the south however do get to enjoy better diesel then we do. Higher cetane values and lubricity values...but this also has a lot to do with the warmer weather you folk get to enjoy too.
If they are using a lower sulfur fuel, then they will have to be adding a lubricant to get better lubricity values. Most standard #2 diesel fuel do not add to the lubricity side of this fuel except through the sulfur which is what caused so many pump failures when they dropped the sulfur levels the first time. The solution was manufactures re mod'd their pumps to accomidate this problem and to my knowledge the lubricity was not added to this process. This is one of the main reasons to use a good fuel additive such as the DT2000 as it will put the lubricatin back in, and nuetralize the sulfur before it becomes acidic and builds up carbon around and onto the injectors. This along with many other factors inherent of diesel fuels (water for example).
 
Messages
13
Location
Guelph Ontario Canada
In canada, the lubricity issue is dealt with by having a lubricity minimum for #2 and #1 fuel up here. This is a government standard. CGSB minimum for #2 is 1.9 cst. During the summer the average for #2 is 3.0 - 3.2 cst. During the winter, it often will go below this for fuel that is blended for the prairies and colder regions. So the oil companies must then add lubricity additives to bring the value up to the minimum. In ontario lubricity additives are rarely added at the refinery since it naturally won't go below the minimum rating. Diesel in canada are blended to meet CGSB specifications for the different weather regions for canada ( meeting minimum low temp ratings ). The CGSB has added these lubricity values to the #1 and #2 spec in 94 when we switched to 0.05 ( low sulfur ) diesel. This is also why we don't add #1 or keroscene or any other thinner distillate to our fuels up here in the winter...we just use whats at the pump. The paranoid, or people who drive between regions, however will add antigell / de-icer to the fuel. I am not aware of similar government standard in the states for lubricity. I do know that ECD1 ( the new ultra low sulfur diesel just recently being sold in the states ) does get tested by ARCO with BOCLE ratings. 3100 BOCLE is the target they say they meet with or without lubricity additives ( depends on time of year. In comparison Biodiesel (B100) is 7000, and 0.05 ( low sulfur ) diesel is 4250. So even with new 15 ppm diesel its still provides decent lubricity values. Though I'd still want to add more lubricity additive to bring it up to at least low sulfur levels. Numbers quoted from the Cytoculture marine biodiesel page.
 
Top