Brake bleeder corrosion

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Apr 17, 2012
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West Michigan
Living in Michigan (aka Capital of the Salt Belt, USA) I've had many problems with seized and corroded brake bleeders in the past. As such, any time I open them I like ot make sure they are well soaked in oil before and after bleeding. I also like to leave a little oil in the bleeder itself under the dust cover to inhibit moisture and maybe work its way into the bleeder threads. On the admittedly rare occasion that I need to replace the bleeder, or that I'm installing a new caliper what is the best thread dope to use? There are a ton of options out there so I'll list a few that come to mind but if you have a better choice post it! - regular grease (lb-cg lithium grease, eg JT-6) - #2 grease with moly (eg: schaeffers or Synpower) - white lithium grease - moly compound (eg: Jet-Lube MP-50) - silicone brake or dielectric grease (3M, Motorcraft, etc) - anti seize compound (such as permatex) - thread sealant (eg: Permatex 56521) - teflon tape - oil, of any type - dry I noticed, years ago when installing on a motorcycle, that SpeedBleeders offers a dedicated thread sealant but I have no idea what it is or where to purchase except from them. At this time I typically use silicone brake lube like motorcraft XG-3A or an anti seize compound to prevent future corrosion if its a new assembly but I'd love to go with safest and most effective option out there.
 
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
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South Wales, UK
I've always used a little copper grease on the threads without issue. If I've not had them out before I spend 10-15minutes wire brushing them to remove any dirt or corrosion and soak them in a good penetrating fluid for a few days. Usually they will come out with no fuss, if they fight me I use my small impact driver and a suitable socket to get them out. I've not lost the fight yet!
 
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Jan 10, 2017
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Michigan
Originally Posted by WyrTwister
Are stainless steel bleed screws valuable ?
Only if the caliper they are threaded into is also stainless.
 
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MA, Mittelfranken.de
Originally Posted by WyrTwister
Are stainless steel bleed screws valuable ?
Sure, and they can be used without issue in iron and aluminum calipers. Copper or a non metal never seize that contains graphite when using them in, this will prevent galvanic corrosion in the threads. Graphite based is probably the best in these application. When using stainless fasteners in aluminum which we do all the time, you must be religious with the use of never seize. https://www.probolt-usa.com/stainle...parts/stainless-steel-bleed-nipples.html
 
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May 26, 2014
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Columbus,Nebraska
Coat them with Eastwood Anti-Corrosion aerosol product. I've use the product on components prone to rusting and it seems to stay in place for years. I used the product on the bare metal CV joints shortly after I purchased the vehicle and it's still there. You can remove this product with mineral spirits or brake cleaner. It goes on thin and then congeals to a wax like coating that seems to be durable. It goes on son thin it will penetrate small clearances and make an effective seal. I like the amber color as you don't have to shake the can.
 

wtd

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Jun 25, 2002
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3,200
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southwest Mo.
I had to replace both calipers recently on my 98 K3500 chevy truck because the bleeder valves broke off. This time I put some synthetic caliper grease around the threads to see if that will keep the water off of the threads. The problem with these calipers is that the bleeder valves sit down inside a little bowl on the caliper so any water that gets up there would sit inside of the bowl. I plan on checking periodically to see if the grease stays put.
 

buck91

Thread starter
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Apr 17, 2012
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West Michigan
Well, lets bring this back to the top and see if there are any new ideas. Seems like the winners so far are:

1. Never Seize, copper or graphite anti seize
2. Silicone Grease
3. other Brake grease, non-silicone

I'm curious about these stainless steel bleeders. Given that most calipers are cast iron I'm not sure how much they would help. Maybe some- but then if they are too soft or brittle it might be like two steps forward and one step back.
 
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Apr 25, 2017
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Ohio
I'm curious about these stainless steel bleeders. Given that most calipers are cast iron
Stainless with cast iron is better than carbon steel with cast iron 🤷‍♂️ In the 1st case, only one piece will rust while in the 2nd, both will (can).
 
Joined
Apr 1, 2020
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Pacific Northwest
I don't usually put anything on, not living in the rust belt.

I would expect the best way to keep them free is to give all your cars an annual brake bleed and give them a shot of your favorite panther pee while you're at it.
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2014
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On the road Midwest
Well, lets bring this back to the top and see if there are any new ideas. Seems like the winners so far are:

1. Never Seize, copper or graphite anti seize
2. Silicone Grease
3. other Brake grease, non-silicone

I'm curious about these stainless steel bleeders. Given that most calipers are cast iron I'm not sure how much they would help. Maybe some- but then if they are too soft or brittle it might be like two steps forward and one step back.
Stainless steel speed bleeders are definitely the way to go. They WON'T rust. Some people may balk at $15 or so per pair, but I've never heard of anyone who has them crying about them; they're so wonderful (one man bleeding) I'm pretty sure they're patented. http://www.speedbleeder.com/size.htm
 
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