Best circa 2000-2008 truck?

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My parents 2000 Tundra is a pleasure to drive and reliable with 117k. It seems like a decent choice in early part of 2000’s. A precursor to the refined trucks GM and Ford became along the way.
 

Huie83

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Originally Posted By: Richie
My old 2002 Tundra was indestructible. I can only hope the same for my 2012.
Good to know. I think I'm pretty much set on a 2007 on up Tundra. Looking around outside of my tri-state area, they are in my upper price range with just a little over 100K miles which is fine by me. I think it would serve me good for a long time. One thing I've noticed while watching the competitive comparisons is everyone disses on the Tundra for only having a C channel frame in the bed section of the truck and it flexes a lot. From what I have read, Toyota calls this their triple-tech frame and it's designed like this on purpose. Its fully boxed up front, partially in the mid and just a c channel in the rear for more flex and better handling. It also has a two piece drive shaft. Chevy touts it has a super stiff frame that is fully boxed all the way back, same with Ford I believe. Opinions on frame flex?
 
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As much as I call the Tundra a Lexus in drag, the 1st gen was a hit for Toyota and it's a good truck. Sturdy drivetrain based off the Land Cruiser 100 series and the LS400/430 of that era, timing belt is a fact of life but not a terrible job to do unless you need to cam seals on a VVT-i equipped UZ-series V8. The V6 Tundras are dogs but still plenty tough. The F150 of that era from 2004-2008 was probably when Ford started to refine them, and the GMT800 Chevy/GMC aren't bad. The latter introduced the LSx V8s to the GM trucks, but I'd be leery with the 4L60E unless it was properly rebuilt. I liked driving a friend's cousin's 2004 F150 FX4.
 
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I love my 03 Dakota sport, extended cab 4x4 5-speed manual with 4.7 v8. It's hard finding one without rust though, and even those can have problems.
 
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Originally Posted By: Huie83
Originally Posted By: Richie
My old 2002 Tundra was indestructible. I can only hope the same for my 2012.
Good to know. I think I'm pretty much set on a 2007 on up Tundra. Looking around outside of my tri-state area, they are in my upper price range with just a little over 100K miles which is fine by me. I think it would serve me good for a long time.
Few thoughts: 2007-2009 did have the 4.7L V8 available, which is timing belt and 5AT. In 2010 they added the 4.6L, which is timing chain, and runs a 6AT. "Many" of the 4.6 owners don't really report better mpg than the 5.7. So, I'd grab the 5.7 if possible, 4.6 only if it has the tow package (has some deeper gearing to make up for the torque loss, which shows up on any incline). Not that I have anything against the 4.7 but many don't like having to deal with the belts. [Which might work to your advantage?] Been a while but there were a few problem areas, starting around 2010, give or take. Cam tower oil leaks are a big job, and seem to pop up on the 5.7's (but not the 4.6). Water pumps. Steering racks. Front diff, a number got built with wrong preload and go bad. I've heard of a few rear wheel bearings but that might just be normal bearing wearout. Transmissions seem robust; the temp gauge on the dash is an idiot gauge and won't tell you anything--but Aisin's don't care about high heat. Tow package (which is standard on 5.7) has a decent ATF cooler. ATF is "lifetime" and a bit of a pain to change as there is no dipstick. And of course, rust...
Quote:
One thing I've noticed while watching the competitive comparisons is everyone disses on the Tundra for only having a C channel frame in the bed section of the truck and it flexes a lot. From what I have read, Toyota calls this their triple-tech frame and it's designed like this on purpose. Its fully boxed up front, partially in the mid and just a c channel in the rear for more flex and better handling. It also has a two piece drive shaft. Chevy touts it has a super stiff frame that is fully boxed all the way back, same with Ford I believe. Opinions on frame flex?
Been a while here too, but my recollection was that they all flex. None are somehow 100% stiff, and as a result, they all can hit a harmonic on just the right surface where they all can do a dance. If it was a real problem, we'd have seen snapped frames by now. If anything I wish mine wasn't boxed up front. Harder to oil seal a boxed frame. Water and sand can pile in over time on a boxed frame, and it gets out how? * Oh, do watch out for payload. Tundra was low on payload, which makes their tow rating a bit suspicious IMO. Or at the very least, in order to hit max tow, don't plan on having anything else in the truck, as every ounce of payload will be taken up by tongue weight. My Tundra only has something like 1,255lb payload, nothing to write home about (but sufficient for my needs).
 

Huie83

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Originally Posted By: supton
Originally Posted By: Huie83
Originally Posted By: Richie
My old 2002 Tundra was indestructible. I can only hope the same for my 2012.
Good to know. I think I'm pretty much set on a 2007 on up Tundra. Looking around outside of my tri-state area, they are in my upper price range with just a little over 100K miles which is fine by me. I think it would serve me good for a long time.
Few thoughts: 2007-2009 did have the 4.7L V8 available, which is timing belt and 5AT. In 2010 they added the 4.6L, which is timing chain, and runs a 6AT. "Many" of the 4.6 owners don't really report better mpg than the 5.7. So, I'd grab the 5.7 if possible, 4.6 only if it has the tow package (has some deeper gearing to make up for the torque loss, which shows up on any incline). Not that I have anything against the 4.7 but many don't like having to deal with the belts. [Which might work to your advantage?] Been a while but there were a few problem areas, starting around 2010, give or take. Cam tower oil leaks are a big job, and seem to pop up on the 5.7's (but not the 4.6). Water pumps. Steering racks. Front diff, a number got built with wrong preload and go bad. I've heard of a few rear wheel bearings but that might just be normal bearing wearout. Transmissions seem robust; the temp gauge on the dash is an idiot gauge and won't tell you anything--but Aisin's don't care about high heat. Tow package (which is standard on 5.7) has a decent ATF cooler. ATF is "lifetime" and a bit of a pain to change as there is no dipstick. And of course, rust...
Quote:
One thing I've noticed while watching the competitive comparisons is everyone disses on the Tundra for only having a C channel frame in the bed section of the truck and it flexes a lot. From what I have read, Toyota calls this their triple-tech frame and it's designed like this on purpose. Its fully boxed up front, partially in the mid and just a c channel in the rear for more flex and better handling. It also has a two piece drive shaft. Chevy touts it has a super stiff frame that is fully boxed all the way back, same with Ford I believe. Opinions on frame flex?
Been a while here too, but my recollection was that they all flex. None are somehow 100% stiff, and as a result, they all can hit a harmonic on just the right surface where they all can do a dance. If it was a real problem, we'd have seen snapped frames by now. If anything I wish mine wasn't boxed up front. Harder to oil seal a boxed frame. Water and sand can pile in over time on a boxed frame, and it gets out how? * Oh, do watch out for payload. Tundra was low on payload, which makes their tow rating a bit suspicious IMO. Or at the very least, in order to hit max tow, don't plan on having anything else in the truck, as every ounce of payload will be taken up by tongue weight. My Tundra only has something like 1,255lb payload, nothing to write home about (but sufficient for my needs).
Thanks for all the input, much appreciated. Lots of the 07-08's I have been looking at have the 4.7 which is fine. I'd rather have the 5.7 but the 4.7 will do fine for my needs. I've done the timing belt in our 06 Sienna and the job on the 4.7 is pretty similar. We'll see though, I may be able to use it as a bargaining chip in my advantage but it would be nice to not have to worry about it. I'm still looking at 04-06 Silverado's and Sierra's too. The 07-12 I believe were during their bankruptcy and from everything I've read suffered heavily quality wise from that. One Other option is the Nissan Titan from the mid-late 2000's. If anyone has one I'd like to hear your experiences. The price is right on these.
 
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