Are we seeing more oil related failures in modern cars?

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There is a HUGE difference between an extended OCI and just ignoring your engine oil. Radio shows are entertainment. I have not listened to these two clowns but if they don't make that distinction then my old dog has twice as much brain power.
They also claim the reason for extended drain intervals recommended by the Manufacturers is to make their vehicles appear to be more "maintenance free" to the shopping consumer. Why buy Vehicle X when you have to change the oil every 5K when Vehicle Y says you only have to change the oil at 10K?...gee...I guess Vehicle Y is a superior design because it doesn't require as much maintenance.

At least that's how Louis describes it and blames the increase on the engine failures that he encounters at their shop.

:)

Ed
 
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They also claim the reason for extended drain intervals recommended by the Manufacturers is to make their vehicles appear to be more "maintenance free" to the shopping consumer. Why buy Vehicle X when you have to change the oil every 5K when Vehicle Y says you only have to change the oil at 10K?...gee...I guess Vehicle Y is a superior design because it doesn't require as much maintenance.

At least that's how Louis describes it and blames the increase on the engine failures that he encounters at their shop.

:)

Ed

It is a selling point. Less maintenance is attractive to those who don’t understand all the factors involved. Nobody at the dealership is going to go against the grain either. So, the senior citizen that drives 1000 miles a year going to the store and back is treated the same as the driver that puts 1000 miles a week on his cars as a delivery driver.

Over time though, one will discover the consequences of not knowing what is best.
 
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It is a selling point. Less maintenance is attractive to those who don’t understand all the factors involved. Nobody at the dealership is going to go against the grain either. So, the senior citizen that drives 1000 miles a year going to the store and back is treated the same as the driver that puts 1000 miles a week on his cars as a delivery driver.

Over time though, one will discover the consequences of not knowing what is best.
The manufacturer's should have some solid bulleted disclaimers about checking oil, doing maintenance, severe conditions, etc
 
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The manufacturer's should have some solid bulleted disclaimers about checking oil, doing maintenance, severe conditions, etc


Indeed. I was fortunate in my last buying experience as the service dept asked me about my driving routine which led to the 5000 mile/1 year oci.
 
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Yours is the only answer that makes sense. Too many people don't check their oil these days.
You would be correct in my case the last year. I dropped to 2.5 quarts of oil in my ford superduty over 11 months and 3100 miles.
I had a very severe brain injury at work a couple years ago and my ability to remember to check things I have always done is out the window. Having a terrible painful knee also takes its toll on wanting to review fluids and filters etc.
I am hoping I can get back on track using my phone to remind me of what I never used to forget..
 
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I'm in my mid 30s and a lot of my peers have no clue, or do have a clue and don't care. I have a few friends who are savvy but we are friends because we have common interests like cars.

I have other friends who drive around with parts falling off who do not care. Most of them know the cars need "stuff", but what stuff? What is a scam and what helps? I really love "If it ain't broke don't fix it". Just because it works now doesn't mean its not in the process of breaking. Things tell you when they are failing. Clicking, rattling, stumbling, it all means something.

Then I get a call when it's too late, or hear about how their car is so awful - "It's junk, I should have bought X brand!"

Yeah, that'll fix it. Wait until they learn EVs need stuff too. That is gonna be whole other mess.
 
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I'm in my mid 30s and a lot of my peers have no clue, or do have a clue and don't care. I have a few friends who are savvy but we are friends because we have common interests like cars.

I have other friends who drive around with parts falling off who do not care. Most of them know the cars need "stuff", but what stuff? What is a scam and what helps? I really love "If it ain't broke don't fix it". Just because it works now doesn't mean its not in the process of breaking. Things tell you when they are failing. Clicking, rattling, stumbling, it all means something.

Then I get a call when it's too late, or hear about how their car is so awful - "It's junk, I should have bought X brand!"

Yeah, that'll fix it. Wait until they learn EVs need stuff too. That is gonna be whole other mess.
Unless you drive a Hyundai, they might as well include a list of mechanically irrelevant noises in the owners manual.
 

KJH

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I dont believe its the oil or OCI necessarily, since the 80s or 90s consumers as a whole have been maintaining their cars like garbage. Its engine design and engine design philosophy where emissions/economy are being heavily regulated by gov and desired by consumers, all while having to pump out better performance numbers than previous generations that puts engineers in a pinch. Many in this thread have already stated this in so many ways.

If you look at the root causes of the engine failures of modern engines, its all from trying to get acceptable power numbers and low end torque(as 90% of drivers never go above 4k rpm) from the tiniest lightest least fuel burning engine. This involves thin aluminum engine blocks, direct injection, and sometimes turbochargers. Cooling systems and gasket/seal material is infinitely better than the past, but combustion chamber temps are sky high with everything turbo'ed and/or high compression which is attainable by DI, and the engine blocks, pistons and rods are thin as possible aluminum. Even with the better cooling systems, surface temps inside the combustion chamber are sky high and cook oil, gumming up passages when oil drainage is already exacerbated by complex head/valvetrain design that causes oil to drain less effectively. With the tiny turbo engines, turbos are an expensive vital item that will grenade far quicker your internals if they aren't getting proper lubrication. For companies choosing to go with larger non turbo 4cyl, those need to be 2.2l+ to satisfy the low end torque and power that the average braindead driver needs, for 4cy of that displacement you need balance shafts to run smoothly, yet another complex part that needs to have proper oiling. And so on and so on..

Basically, manufacturers are engineering themselves in circles around the fact that emissions, economy and power have taken precedence over solid reliable fundamental engine design. And honestly most OEM's do a good job of it walking this line as most engines are pretty reliable, but the failures we are seeing in terms of vital internal parts seems to be going up, instead of the head gasket, seal and belt related problems that were so frequent in the past.

Every manufacturer is doing this, but I suspect the brands like Hyundai/Kia, Chevy also use inferior engine materials and less engineering r+d(as well as hyundai/kia being inexperienced with ground up engine design) because the low sticker prices are coming from somewhere, which is why the result for those cars is rod knock and melted pistons vs relatively minor problems like oil consumption you see with Toyota and Honda etc.

Compare this to the 90s, in my opinion the golden age of engines(if you dont care about emissions). Iron blocks, aluminum blocks were thick, small and sporty cars had smaller displacement but higher revving motors, turbo cars had internals that could handle double or triple the HP of stock. If they had that mentality today along with increase in materials tech and engineering, OEM's could design an engine that could go a million miles at 8k intervals. Many Toyotas from the 90s could do that anyway.
 
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love the old legacy Toyota engines I run and my '16 Honda 1.5T (son owns now) is still great, power, efficiency at 70k but requires attention in winter drawing out and replacing diluted lubricant..otherwise a pleasant little pkg.
 
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