Anything into oil (from Discover Magazine)

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43,658
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'Stralia
No, it means that if you put 100 BTUs of waste into the produces 85 btus. If you take that same 100btus and put it into landfill, you get none BTUs.
 

garyb80

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Check it out. Science - Reuters Plant to Make Clean Power from Turkey Droppings Wed Dec 15, 5:12 PM ET Science - Reuters By Timothy Gardner NEW YORK (Reuters) - Turkey leftovers will take on a whole new use after a Minnesota company finishes construction of a power plant fired by the birds' droppings. It may not be the total answer to relieving the United States' addiction to foreign oil, but the plant will burn 90 percent turkey dung and create clean power for 55,000 homes. Three poultry litter plants have already been built in England, but the Benson, Minnesota-based facility will be the first large-scale plant of its type in the U.S. and the largest in the world, according to operator Fibrominn, a subsidiary of power plant builder Homeland Renewable Energy, LLC of Boston. Turkey dung is prized over pig excrement and cow chips. "Poultry litter is drier material, so it burns better, and there's a lot of it," said Charles Grecco, of HH Media, LLC, an investment bank that helped arrange $202 million in financing for the plant. The 55-megawatt plant will burn 700,000 tons of dung a year and produce fertilizer as a by-product, a process that will keep phosphorus and nitrates found in the raw litter from seeping into water supplies, said Grecco. No extra amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide would be emitted than would be naturally emitted as the dung decomposes, said Grecco. Utility Xcel has agreed to purchase the turkey power, said company spokesman Ed Legge. Under 1994 Minnesota state legislation, Xcel is required to buy a small amount of power made from biomass in exchange for clearance to store spent nuclear fuel outside its Red Wing nuclear plant in Minnesota. Fibrowatt, LLC, a Philadelphia-based developer, which is mostly owned by Homeland Renewable Energy, is pursing other plants in poultry-growing U.S. states.
 
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Texas
I ran across this poking around on the net. According to a recent article by Fortune Magazine, the Carthage plant is currently producing about 400 barrels per day of crude oil. This oil is being refined as No. 2 (a standard grade oil which is used for diesel and gasoline) and No. 4 (a lower grade oil used in industrial heating). As of February, 2005, the Carthage plant received an economic setback. It was thought that concern over mad cow disease would prevent the use of turkey waste as cattle feed, and thus this waste would be free. However, turkey waste is still used as feed, so the feed stock costs from $30 to $40 per ton, adding $15 to $20 per barrel to the cost of the oil. On top of the expenses, the roughly $42 per barrel biofuel tax credit on production costs that had been hoped for didn't materialize because the oil produced did not meet the definition of "biofuel" according to the relevant American tax legislation. Final cost is $80/barrel ($1.90/gal), making it uneconomic compared to the net wholesale price of conventional diesel of about $72/barrel ($1.73/gal) (as of April 2005 - view current price). However, this setback does not apply to other forms of waste such as plastics. In addition, the UK has outlawed using turkey waste as cattle feed. The pilot plant in Carthage, Missouri was temporarily shut down due to smell complaints, but was soon restarted when it was discovered that many of the smells were not actually generated by the plant. (reported by the Kansas City Star, April 12, 2005). Furthermore, the plant agreed to install an enhanced thermal oxidizer and to upgrade its air scrubber system under a court order. [3] Since the plant is located only four blocks from the tourist-attracting town center, this has strained relations with the mayor and citizens of Carthage. If it cannot be resolved, this could lead to NIMBYism, making it difficult to implement this technology widely.
 
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130
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Colorado
100 BTU potential from feedstock = 100% 15 BTU input to realize potential subtracted from the potential, therefore 85% efficiency. Whats so difficult to understand? 666% efficiency? Thats flawed logic.
 
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Northern CA
quote:
Originally posted by 'Tard: 100 BTU potential from feedstock = 100% 15 BTU input to realize potential subtracted from the potential, therefore 85% efficiency. Whats so difficult to understand? 666% efficiency? Thats flawed logic.
The Devil made them do it [Big Grin]
 
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