Workbench rebuild - 2x4 kit experience?

JHZR2

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Specifically, this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0030T1BRE?pc_redir=1408764475&robot_redir=1 It's really just molded legs to simplify 2x4 construction of a workbench. Of course making a workbench using legs made of 2x4 or 4x4 is really easy. Workbench construction is not rocket science. But the kit linked to is well reviewed, and I suppose makes things simpler and faster. I may re-build my workbench to be longer than 8', and for whatever reason that product specifies up to 8'. Regardless, I'm sure longer lumber would fit in the kit, or be easy to build from scratch. So, anyone have experience with kits like this? Any pros or cons? I can build either way, just wanted other opinions. Thanks!
 
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Kit looks good. I built a few workbenches for myself and a few more when I was working in a scene shop. I always liked to make 1 leg from 2 pieces of 1x4. Glue with a good waterproof glue and staple or screw them to form a 2x4 Less chance of warping that way. As you mentioned yourself its easy to without the kit too, Either way remember to make the top out of 2 pieces of glued togethered 3/4" ply and add a sacrificial nailed on piece of whatever surface you like. No glue so you can replace it.
 
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Originally Posted By: paulo57509
I think the kit is fine. The hard part will be trying to find straight, off-the-rack 2x4's.
I used the kit to build a 3' by 8' bench, and that was my experience. It does make for fast construction, and with 3/4" plywood on top and bottom (I omitted the middle shelf), it's plenty sturdy. I do wish I'd added a sacrificial top, but maybe next time.
 
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One more thing, If you decide to build it to over 8", It makes more sense most of the time to build two shorter benches instead. Easier should you need to move stuff around for whatever reason and you also have the option to use different Materials for the tops so that some tasks are better suited on one, Some on the other. Like one wood top and one metal top.
 
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Originally Posted By: 123Saab
One more thing, If you decide to build it to over 8", It makes more sense most of the time to build two shorter benches instead. Easier should you need to move stuff around for whatever reason and you also have the option to use different Materials for the tops so that some tasks are better suited on one, Some on the other. Like one wood top and one metal top.
+1 When I built my last set of work benches, I built several that were five and six feet long and simply placed them end to end. It makes it MUCH easier if you have to move one. I have even considered for the next set putting them on wheels to make it even easier to move.
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: paulo57509
I think the kit is fine. The hard part will be trying to find straight, off-the-rack 2x4's.
Well that's an issue if I make the legs out of 2x4 or 4x4s too, no?
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: GreeCguy
Originally Posted By: 123Saab
One more thing, If you decide to build it to over 8", It makes more sense most of the time to build two shorter benches instead. Easier should you need to move stuff around for whatever reason and you also have the option to use different Materials for the tops so that some tasks are better suited on one, Some on the other. Like one wood top and one metal top.
+1 When I built my last set of work benches, I built several that were five and six feet long and simply placed them end to end. It makes it MUCH easier if you have to move one. I have even considered for the next set putting them on wheels to make it even easier to move.
Both of you have good points. And there are cases where I might want them to be at a right angle vs linear, too, so two it is, perhaps even on casters. Would make rearrangement utility faster and raise the work height a bit since I'm pretty tall.
 
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I wouldn't have that in my shop or garage. At only 36 inches high I'd be spending my time at the bench stooped over. And since there are full depth shelves below that, I wouldn't be able to pull my stool up to it and work on something like a carburetor-I'd have to stand and do it or have the stool far enough back so my knees don't hit the shelves. For what that costs I can do a lot of cutting, gluing and screwing and end up with a far better workbench-one that actually that fits me, and it will be far stronger.
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
I wouldn't have that in my shop or garage. At only 36 inches high I'd be spending my time at the bench stooped over. And since there are full depth shelves below that, I wouldn't be able to pull my stool up to it and work on something like a carburetor-I'd have to stand and do it or have the stool far enough back so my knees don't hit the shelves. For what that costs I can do a lot of cutting, gluing and screwing and end up with a far better workbench-one that actually that fits me, and it will be far stronger.
Yeah I haven't measured my current workbench, which is an ideal height. But anything can be raised on blocks or casters.
 

Kestas

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I got creative and made both my workbenches -- garage and basement. My basement workbench surface is made of 2 by 12s, with framing underneath... no kit necessary. I'm tall, so I made sure the height was perfect for me. Both workbenches are sturdy, nailed to the wall, and I can hammer on them.
 
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