Wear question.

Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
5,337
Location
Southeast Texas
Asking for a friend, his truck was out of alignment, and his almost new tires on the front have bad wear (lost 50% or more) on the outside edges only. The inside edges are perfect. He moves them to the back after the alignment. Question is, will the wear start to even out with them on the back? Will the inside edge make more road contact, meaning the high spot will wear down, or will the tire wear still be even all across the whole tire meaning the outside worn edge will continue to wear at the same rate as the rest of the tire?
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2018
Messages
262
Location
Virginia
It has been my experience (only, no research):

No, once you have worn, that vehicle's wear pattern will continue, even after 'corrective' alignment.

I have had 2 tires remounted during rotation, and 'best edges' placed in 'worst edge wear' positions to extend life.
Tire guys buck that, but the monitoring data works.

I suspect, even a misaligned car is not that misaligned (or we would have gone earlier).
But the basic car, its geometry, the drive patterns, and turning speeds all remain the same.
The 2 remounts (and other half rotation) can extend the set's life way past leaving them alone - worth the $35.
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
7,293
It will never fully even out and may have handling issues. At 50% worn off the edge, I would replace them.. The tires would have to be on the back for such a long time that the tires would likely develope other wear irregularaties from not being rotated.
 
Joined
Nov 16, 2009
Messages
757
Location
Wisconsin
Must of been bad to wear so much, so soon. I’d keep an eye on things, unless dangerously worn, keep using, rotate as needed.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
4,227
Location
Somewhere in the US
Whatever wear is on them, will more or less stay there after the alignment is corrected. In order to fix the wear, the alignment has to be readjusted such that the opposite wear pattern is worn into the tire.

What's been done is probably the best way to get as much wear out of the set as possible.
 
Joined
Nov 9, 2008
Messages
19,988
Location
NH
You can fix the wear pattern on rear tires if you have a locker and a way to disable traction control. Should smooth it out a bit in short order.

I wonder if there is value in having the tires dismounted and flipped on the rims. If it's a solid rear axle then I'm not sure what the inside shoulders are doing--important but perhaps not too critical here.
 

gfh77665

Thread starter
Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
5,337
Location
Southeast Texas
I sometimes see a truck with uneven worn tires on the back, and it looks like the fuller parts of the tires make the most contact. I noticed this when following behind someone on a dusty road. Does that equate into more wear on the fuller part and less on the worn part? I would think so but not totally sure.

Anyway, his truck is fixed and the tires are rotated front to back now, so we will see what happens.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2010
Messages
10,414
Location
Champlain/Hudson Valley
I gotta guess that all the variables mentioned here make it a "case-by-case and keep an eye on it" kind of thing.

CASE 1) BIL had a 1970 Ford Supervan with the "Twin I-Beam" front suspension which needed the beams heated and bent to perform an alignment.
He had unevenly wearing tires and flipped them on the rim to even out wear. Worked just fine.

CASE 2) My 1972 Corolla de Luxe hit something and my fronts scalloped badly before I noticed. I "front to reared" them and they restored themselves.
We could dismount and mount tires ourselves. All you needed to pay for was balancing....a whopping $5 at the time.
 
Last edited:
Top