Water heater heat trap

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Sep 30, 2013
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15,265
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Indiana
The new water heater I bought wants a 6” minimum heat trap for the cold water supply located at the bottom of the unit as shown from the instruction manual.

My existing line runs on the ceiling so I was just hoping to 90* down and then 90* back into the heater like my work of art shows. This would service the same purpose correct?

I just take this to mean they don’t want the cold water supply line going straight into the unit.


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dlundblad

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Because heat rises, looks like your 'second' diagram would be needed.
As the instructions show - 6" minimum.

Edited: In the first diagram, there is nothing to prevent heated water from rising up the pipe.
Thanks. I’ll make it like my second drawing.
 
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Jan 1, 2003
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Daytona Beach
I run a heat pump water heater here in FL. Yes, there's plenty of humidity, and the heat pump portion removes some, just not enough to make a huge difference down here.
Be aware that the heat pump will move warm air from your conditioned space into the water. Once again, my heater is in the garage, SO, plenty of heat. Up North however, you may end up overcooling your installed location.
I run it strictly in "economy" mode (heat pump only) and it only needs to run 1.5 hrs a day to bring the 66 gallon tank to 140° F. I only run it that high because of the long underground runs to the useage point. A lot of heat is lost there.
I also run mine on a timer, so it comes on during the highest temp part of the day.

Anyway, it's been great for over 4 years now, and saves me a ton of money on electricity. Energyguide annual usage is 1600 KWH, but I'm sure I fall well below that.
 
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Kingman, Arizona
I bought a new house in June. The only use for natural gas was the water heater. So I replaced it with a hybrid water heater. The savings are double, no base natural gas fee and low operating cost. Now it looks like the new tax bill will give me a 30% tax credit for it.
 
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Athens, GA
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
2,983
Location
Athens, GA
I run a heat pump water heater here in FL. Yes, there's plenty of humidity, and the heat pump portion removes some, just not enough to make a huge difference down here.
Be aware that the heat pump will move warm air from your conditioned space into the water. Once again, my heater is in the garage, SO, plenty of heat. Up North however, you may end up overcooling your installed location.
I run it strictly in "economy" mode (heat pump only) and it only needs to run 1.5 hrs a day to bring the 66 gallon tank to 140° F. I only run it that high because of the long underground runs to the useage point. A lot of heat is lost there.
I also run mine on a timer, so it comes on during the highest temp part of the day.

Anyway, it's been great for over 4 years now, and saves me a ton of money on electricity. Energyguide annual usage is 1600 KWH, but I'm sure I fall well below that.
Economy mode on the Rheem will still run the elements. You need to lock it into heat pump only mode if you don't want them to run. The big debate is why Rheem does that, but no real answers to that question. Mine is currently in heat pump only mode and I'll see this winter if the 'economy' mode makes a difference as my garage temps cool down.

Right now I use about 1/3-1/4 the electricity my resistive heater used. I'm on track to break even on the purchase price in under 2 years. Granted, I got the unit for $500 after rebates.
 

dlundblad

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Joined
Sep 30, 2013
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Got it installed today. Overall I’m happy with it. The water inlet and outlet locations as well as the heat trap made everything a little bulky. My little farmhouse basement didn’t help either.

I ran it in “electric” mode for about an hr to get it up to temp. Now it’s on heat pump.
 
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