Toyota's new electric oil pump.

Flow increases when the passages are wider with reduced pressure and pressure increases with reduced flow when they are smaller.
Flow volume and velocity can only increase in a larger/wider passage if the pressure also increases. Flow volume can't increase in a fixed size passage (regardless of its size) unless the driving pressure also increases. Viscosity is constant for this discussion.

If you're looking at a PD oil pump running at a constant RPM, then the output flow volume is constant, and the flow pressure and velocity change according to the size (flow resistance) of the passage. Larger passage gives lower velocity and less pressure, and smaller passage gives higher velocity and higher pressure - but in both cases the flow volume is the same.
 
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Flow volume and velocity can only increase in a larger/wider passage if the pressure also increases. Flow volume can't increase in a fixed size passage (regardless of its size) unless the driving pressure also increases. Viscosity is constant for this discussion.
If you're looking at a PD oil pump running at a constant RPM, then the output flow volume is constant, and the flow pressure and velocity change according to the size (flow resistance) of the passage. Larger passage gives lower velocity and less pressure, and smaller passage gives higher velocity and higher pressure - but in both cases the flow volume is the same.

Most flow drag by far is determined by the tightest/narrowest spot
which I think is the bearings at the very end of the path anyway.
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What a crazy thread. There are too many variables involved to just say high PSI is better than low PSI. Being fixated on PSI ignores orifice and passage sizes and a host of other design parameters.

Flow increases when the passages are wider with reduced pressure and pressure increases with reduced flow when they are smaller.
I didn’t do it for PSI. i don’t know what the oil pressure even is bc there is no gauges. I live in 100 degree plus heat and in talking with an aquatance whom is a lexus master tech, he said the 3.5 will consume the 0w20, and will not the 5w30 as they never had consumption issues when those engines used 5w30 and only switched to 0w20 only bc of CAFE.
 
Leased car? Smart move.🤣
Call it what you want, just bc it’s a lease doesn’t mean you run trash oil, don’t change it and not give a fu**. Even though I don’t and will never buy used vehicles, someone like maybe your family member is going to possibly buy this when I turn it in and it was well taken care of. And people like you are the reason I would never buy a used vehicle. We laugh at people like you at the dealership, spend 62,000 dollars on a car and run the cheapest fuel, oil, and tires. While your paying a $1,000.00 car note. I don’t work like that.
 
Isn't this too new to tell?
These models featuring the variable displacement pump came out in late 2017 but the previous gen Toyotas still had low oil pressure pumps that were non variable and had about 5-8psi at hot idle and those didn't seem to have oil pressure issues either. The oiling system for sure can be affected by the pressure as it helps with delivery but a very well designed oiling system will allow for proper oiling with low pressure. But there have been engines that didn't have a properly designed oiling system where low oil pressure would provide sufficient lubrification and needed higher oil pressure to make up for it.
 
An electric motor for an oil pump. What could go wrong?

Lots, especially since with the previous mechanical system were very reliable. IMO, the big advantage to this electrical system is when you have a turbo you can circulate the oil after shutdown. Otherwise you run the risk of rats eating wiring for the oil pump.
 
We laugh at people like you at the dealership, spend 62,000 dollars on a car and run the cheapest fuel, oil, and tires. While your paying a $1,000.00 car note. I don’t work like that.
The funny part is, many of those leases become CPOs - only if the servicing was done on time(and preferably at the dealership who inked the lease), 1st tier tires were installed and no collision repair or even an aftermarket windshield. Else, it’s going to an Manheim or ADESA lot to auction. The service loaners at Lexus become CPOs in many cases.

I haven’t seen the CPO criteria at Audi, BMW or Mercedes.
 
The funny part is, many of those leases become CPOs - only if the servicing was done on time(and preferably at the dealership who inked the lease), 1st tier tires were installed and no collision repair or even an aftermarket windshield. Else, it’s going to an Manheim or ADESA lot to auction. The service loaners at Lexus become CPOs in many cases.

I haven’t seen the CPO criteria at Audi, BMW or Mercedes.

We laugh at people who spend 62,000 dollars on a car and run the cheapest fuel, oil, and tires. While your paying a $1,000.00 car note. This is a in general statement, financing mostly.
 
We laugh at people who spend 62,000 dollars on a car and run the cheapest fuel, oil, and tires. While your paying a $1,000.00 car note. This is a in general statement, financing mostly.
Oh yea, I’ve seen LingLong and Leao tires on newish Lexus and BMWs recently, Laufenns on a Tesla and many take nice cars to Oil Changers/Jiffy Lube.

I’ve heard of the sales tower at dealerships ding lease returns for Chinese tires.
 
Most flow drag by far is determined by the tightest/narrowest spot
which I think is the bearings at the very end of the path anyway.
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True, that's why oil pressure goes down (with same oil viscosity & temp) if the main and rod journal bearings get worn. Low oil pressure can also be caused by a worn or damaged oil pump.
 
In my 2022 Lexus RX350 as soon as I got it home at 20 miles, I switched it to Mobil 1 ESP 0w30 C3 rated oil and currently at 12,000 miles. Don’t wait just do it. Mine is a lease.
Why do you use a diesel oil??
 
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Shouldn't the title read 'Toyota finally using an electronically controlled
oil pump'
(more than a decade after the rest of the industry did) then?
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Why do you use a diesel oil??
ACEA Cx sequences are dual-rated for gas and diesel - especially automotive diesels using Bluetec/SCR and DPF and gassers using GPFs. The VW/BMW/Mercedes oil specs build on ACEA Cx alongside A/B specs. ACEA Ex sequences are strictly HDEO.
 
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