Toyota Tundra Warranty

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10,494
Location
Colorado Springs
Originally Posted by Tundra73
Originally Posted by Duffyjr
Originally Posted by Tundra73
Oh, and I just re-read the posts about when I said the oil change was $35. Let me clarify something. I think I may have confused you all. If I do nothing and let the dealer do it all, oil change, tire rotation, and multi-point inspection, the total is $108.00. The $35 I was writing about was what they would charge me for the multi-point inspection, tire rotation, and changing the oil and filter that I provide. So, you have to add the cost of the oil and filter I would buy at Walmart to the equation. Which for QSUD and filter, would be roughly $42. For a total of $77.00, which is cheaper than what the dealer charges total. Plus, unless they royally screw me, I would know exactly what oil is going in the engine.
What filter are they using? I think I would buy my own and take it in, that's $30 savings. I also didn't know Mobil Super came in synthetic, when I bought my Lucerne I asked and they said Mobil Super so I just assumed it was the conventional/blend.
They don't include the filter...I would be bringing a Toyota filter purchased at Walmart for $6. Also, yes, Mobil Super Synthetic is a full synthetic: Mobil Super Synthetic You are thinking of Mobil Super, which is just a synthetic blend.
It is "synthetic" but pour point of -39 indicates low quality base stock. For comparison M1 0W20 EP has pour point -51 since it has hefty quantity of PAO. I use in 2GR-FE M1 5W30 EP and 10,000 mile OCI. UOA showed excellent results.
 
Messages
43,305
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by PimTac
Pour point is not a accurate reflection of the quality of a base oil.
Pour Point is typically useless, having been replaced by CCS and MRV, however, it does give a small hint at whether there is PAO in the base oil blend, as PAO doesn't have wax in it, so it will produce wickedly low pour points as an artifact of its presence, far below where PPD's are no longer effective in more conventional bases.
 
Messages
1,000
Location
Pa, USA
Originally Posted by Tundra73
My 2019 Toyota Tundra has a required 5,000 mile OCI because it is the Flex Fuel (FFV) engine.
Toyota afraid of E-85? Is that really the reason?
 
Messages
43,305
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by NH73
Originally Posted by Tundra73
My 2019 Toyota Tundra has a required 5,000 mile OCI because it is the Flex Fuel (FFV) engine.
Toyota afraid of E-85? Is that really the reason?
E85 runs richer and fuel dilutes more from what I recall, which is in turn harder on the oil. So the shorter interval makes sense.
 
Messages
4,872
Location
VA
Are there any other Toyota Dealers around you? I live in between 2. Both are about 25 miles away. Maybe get a better deal?
 
Messages
1,000
Location
Pa, USA
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by NH73
Originally Posted by Tundra73
My 2019 Toyota Tundra has a required 5,000 mile OCI because it is the Flex Fuel (FFV) engine.
Toyota afraid of E-85? Is that really the reason?
E85 runs richer and fuel dilutes more from what I recall, which is in turn harder on the oil. So the shorter interval makes sense.
Was it ever proven to dilute the oil more?
 

Tundra73

Thread starter
Messages
54
Location
Arkansas
Originally Posted by NH73
Originally Posted by Tundra73
My 2019 Toyota Tundra has a required 5,000 mile OCI because it is the Flex Fuel (FFV) engine.
Toyota afraid of E-85? Is that really the reason?
The reason has now become apparent. Toyota released a TSB on it. Apparently (again, I am not as astute with mechanical issues) there is an issue when running the E85 in the engine that the system will calculate the alcohol density wrong and etc, etc eventually a new fuel pump is needed and a refresh of the ECM. Fortunately, I have not ever ran any E85.
 
Messages
558
Location
Valencia, CA
That's pretty cheap and I would continue to go to that dealer.
Originally Posted by Tundra73
Originally Posted by WagonWheel
At 5k mi, what ever option is cheaper for you! How much does the dealer charge? Do they send out coupons?
$35 which includes tire rotation.
 
Messages
43,305
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by NH73
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by NH73
Originally Posted by Tundra73
My 2019 Toyota Tundra has a required 5,000 mile OCI because it is the Flex Fuel (FFV) engine.
Toyota afraid of E-85? Is that really the reason?
E85 runs richer and fuel dilutes more from what I recall, which is in turn harder on the oil. So the shorter interval makes sense.
Was it ever proven to dilute the oil more?
Unfortunately we don't get enough UOA's of E85 use on here, but I believe that's the premise.
 
Messages
3
Location
Jersey
That's a bunch of miles in a truck that is not known for gas mileage cool I'm not entirely sure why you're worried about spending just a little more money for the OCI that the manufacturer suggests. Yes, it may be overkill but so is commuting in a Tundra
 

Tundra73

Thread starter
Messages
54
Location
Arkansas
Originally Posted by Harry_Seaward
That's a bunch of miles in a truck that is not known for gas mileage cool
Didn't buy it for mpg, I bought it for reliability. cool
Quote
I'm not entirely sure why you're worried about spending just a little more money for the OCI that the manufacturer suggests.
It isn't about the money so much as it is about the oil. I want to know for certain a good oil is being used. I am not particularly fond on Mobil Super Synthetic...if that is really what is being used. For a 5,000 mile OCI, I think the best cost/oil quality choice for me is QSUD. So, I think I am going to go with having the dealership perform the maintenance, but I provide the oil and filter. Once the warranty is up, I will switch to Mobil 1 EP and a 10,000 mile OCI, having the dealership continuing to perform the maintenance.
 
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13,299
Location
1/2 hr N.E. of Detroit
Dealers overall don't like when customers bring their own oil. They don't want to wait for one drip every five seconds, before reinstalling the oil pan bolt. So odds are they will give you an oil change that might be a full quart short of your new oil supplied and may not return your leftover quart. For oil changes, you are better-off finding an oil change lube shop that lets you watch the process. Have the tires rotated every 10K with the oil change. Be wary of dealers doing both jobs. My Hyundai dealer did the rotation first - then the oil change. Half-ezz backwards, thus not letting the oil drain completely while the tires were being rotated. I found this out when I complained about my dipstick still being quite dark, when the vehicle was returned to me. At 7.5K and two sets of oil changes already completed on my Hyundai, that new oil should have been clear on the dipstick. No dealer ever touches my oil again.
 
Messages
3
Location
Jersey
If I were to let the dealer change it, I would allow the dealer to use their oil. It meets Toyota's spec and if you were to have any issues they would be more likely to help you out since you have allowed them to do all the maintenance with their parts. You start bringing in your own oil to the dealer and they'll be less likely to stand behind the service. At the end of the day it's really a non issue. It will run just as long on their oil as it would on ANY other oil. Or maybe it would last 10k more miles on some special oil but you'll never know the difference
 
Messages
16,832
Location
NH
Originally Posted by super20dan
I also bought my tundra for reliability, certainly not for the 12.5 mpg as I tow a lawn service trailer. fuel cost avg 10$ per day
Would other trucks do much better in stop and go while towing the same trailer? I mean, Tundra doesn't use any of the standard tricks to make mpg, but I don't think it's somehow that much worse when under actual load.
 
Messages
1,000
Location
Pa, USA
Originally Posted by Tundra73
Originally Posted by NH73
Originally Posted by Tundra73
My 2019 Toyota Tundra has a required 5,000 mile OCI because it is the Flex Fuel (FFV) engine.
Toyota afraid of E-85? Is that really the reason?
The reason has now become apparent. Toyota released a TSB on it. Apparently (again, I am not as astute with mechanical issues) there is an issue when running the E85 in the engine that the system will calculate the alcohol density wrong and etc, etc eventually a new fuel pump is needed and a refresh of the ECM. Fortunately, I have not ever ran any E85.
Sounds like Toyota can't make a FFV.
 
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