Toyota Transfer Gear Oil 75W VOA

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173
Location
Great Lakes
Interesting, could this be for Toyota fleet fuel economy improvement?

I use 75w-90 in the front, rear and transfer case of everything and be done with it. I have owned several tundras and sequoias since 2000, all lived to 300k + miles and I still see an 2002 I sold around town that I sold in 2015, guy told me he is pushing 500k and no problems with the power train.

As a matter of fact the early tundras would sometimes have a long delay when you disengage the 4wD but after switching to 75w-90 smooth as butter. Fuel economy did suffer slightly after switching.

Rust gets them before the power train will fail at least in my neck of the woods.
 
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2
I have a 2018 4Runner with part-time 4WD that's due for a transfer case oil change. Due to the price shock, I'm looking for an alternative to Toyota's liquid gold. Turns out lots of other people are doing the same! And that there are many opinions on the topic.

My manual states I can use an equivalent to the 75W LF, but doesn't elaborate, just says to contact my dealer. So I called my dealer's Parts department and requested the primary and any alternate part number.

The Parts guy never even mentioned the 75W LF. Instead he gave me p/n 08885-02506 (75W-85 GL-5 "Differential Gear Oil") as the primary. And p/n 08885-80306 (75W-90 GL-5 "Gear Oil Super” AKA “GO-Super") as an alternate.

Then I inquired what the Service department is using for TC's. I was given p/n 00289-ATFWS (Toyota’s “World Standard” automatic transmission fluid)!

I noticed Ravenol boldly claims their 75W MTF is suitable for this particular application. But is there a recent VOA for it?
Ravenol MTF More specs on their German site

I'm ready to throw up my hands and just put in the same AMSOIL SVG 75W-90 I used for the diff. Given that the most miles I've ever put on a vehicle before dumping it was about 75K, and I don't plan to change my ways, does it really matter?! :unsure:

BTW, I live in Las Vegas, NV so my vehicle is exposed to hot weather, but rarely to sub-freezing weather and never to truly cold weather. I do get off the pavement quite often, but I never tow anything.
 
Messages
1,930
Location
Paradise of Florida
The fluid is labelled for fuel economy. You can guess what my thoughts are concerning thin fluids.

Didnt see anything internally or transfer case specific that would require anything special.

That stout additive package probably is to carry the thin visc. And, I probably wouldnt use some of the less stout substitutes that are being recommended.

Toyota actuators can be a bit grumpy when cold. Dealers like to replace them and charge a fortune. They can be contact cleaned and resealed but some models hard to get to so you pull the xfer case to swap or service the solenoids. Has nothing to do with visc other than how slow they are when cold.

Since Toyota had a history with transfer case GL5 gear oils, I would either use the OE MPG LF 75w or snub my nose at MPG and fill it with GL5 75w85 or 75w90. I dont see any commonly available GL5 75w80's in the USA. Once the gear oil is warm, it cant be any worse than the 75w LF when cold.

I dont practice shift on the fly shenanigans. I think that it would be smart to anticipate the terrain and engage/disengage 4wdHi 2wdHi as needed from a stop. I'd wager that the thinner fluid might be quicker than thicker fluids....for the clueless driver shifting into 4wd at 50mph, especially if there is some transfer case synchronisation when engaging 4wdHi. Disengaging 4wd should be a non issue regardless of fluid.
 
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2
...Toyota actuators can be a bit grumpy when cold. Dealers like to replace them and charge a fortune. They can be contact cleaned and resealed but some models hard to get to so you pull the xfer case to swap or service the solenoids. Has nothing to do with visc other than how slow they are when cold.

Since Toyota had a history with transfer case GL5 gear oils, I would either use the OE MPG LF 75w or snub my nose at MPG and fill it with GL5 75w85 or 75w90. I dont see any commonly available GL5 75w80's in the USA. Once the gear oil is warm, it cant be any worse than the 75w LF when cold.

I dont practice shift on the fly shenanigans. I think that it would be smart to anticipate the terrain and engage/disengage 4wdHi 2wdHi as needed from a stop. I'd wager that the thinner fluid might be quicker than thicker fluids....for the clueless driver shifting into 4wd at 50mph, especially if there is some transfer case synchronisation when engaging 4wdHi. Disengaging 4wd should be a non issue regardless of fluid.

I get a "clunk" when moving between 4L and 4H if the drivetrain isn't warmed up. Not something I do regularly, but in rare instances I have to make that shift before I have driven much. Is that the actuator grumpiness you refer to? When everything is warmed up, TC shifting is quiet and smooth.

My TC has not been touched yet, so presumably it has the OEM 75W LF in it. IF they are even using it at the factory, LOL.

I don't live or drive in snow country, so I only shift into/out of 4WD at low speeds on unpaved roads.

(Off-topic fun fact: my Wrangler manual recommended that I put the transmission in neutral BUT still be rolling at 2-3 MPH when shifting into/out of low range! This was a problem if I had already started a climb then realized I need low range. Actually, TC shifting was a problem all the time as the TC lever was hard to move. I'm quite happy I now have a dial instead.)

So is anyone going to talk me out of using the AMSOIL SVG 75W-90? 🙃
 
Messages
80
Location
Arkansas
I noticed Ravenol boldly claims their 75W MTF is suitable for this particular application. But is there a recent VOA for it?
Ravenol MTF More specs on their German site
The Ravenol is used by all the guys on the Toyota Tundra forums. I have it in my Tundra. Runs smoother that the Toyota factory fluid. Many who have went with 75W-85 or 75W-90 have had issues. The older Tundras would be fine, but in 2014 they went to a new transfer case that requires the 75W. I would use it only. As far as I know. the only fluid in that weight besides the Toyota fluid is Ravenol and Redline.
 
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Messages
47,692
Location
Duvall WA - Pacific NW USA
I get a "clunk" when moving between 4L and 4H if the drivetrain isn't warmed up. Not something I do regularly, but in rare instances I have to make that shift before I have driven much. Is that the actuator grumpiness you refer to? When everything is warmed up, TC shifting is quiet and smooth.

My TC has not been touched yet, so presumably it has the OEM 75W LF in it. IF they are even using it at the factory, LOL.

I don't live or drive in snow country, so I only shift into/out of 4WD at low speeds on unpaved roads.

(Off-topic fun fact: my Wrangler manual recommended that I put the transmission in neutral BUT still be rolling at 2-3 MPH when shifting into/out of low range! This was a problem if I had already started a climb then realized I need low range. Actually, TC shifting was a problem all the time as the TC lever was hard to move. I'm quite happy I now have a dial instead.)

So is anyone going to talk me out of using the AMSOIL SVG 75W-90? 🙃
You don't need that in your TC. In warm places it probably won't hurt anything, in cold places, you might have some sluggishness when changing.

This is what you want: https://www.amsoil.com/p/manual-synchromesh-transmission-fluid-5w-30-mtf/?zo=515729

I was very surprised when I changed my TC to MTF. Changing to 4Hi or 4Lo became instant. Factory fluid was always rolling for awhile. Many Toyota Tacoma and Tundra owners now running the MTF and are very happy with it. The factory fluid had ATF apparent viscosity, and I'm telling you the MTF protects better as well.
 
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