Toyota 5.7L burning oil

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213
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Great Lakes
A bit of back sorry, I maintain a 5.7L for a buddy of mine which has 70K miles. I have maintained it since about 20K miles and it always used Mobil 1 AFE 0w-20 every 5K miles as he does not want deviate from the recommended viscosity. Did not use a drop between oil changes

Fast forward to the last three oil changes, I used RGT since we scored a stash like a lot have and the truck starts using oil 1qt per 1K miles. So at 4K we dumped the oil and used Mobil 1 AFE again and oil burning stopped? Now on the third oil change went back to RGT since we have a stash to use and burning started again.

I am starting to re think my position that oil is oil. Maybe there is some truth to the fact that certain cars prefer certain oils.

Wondering if we should dump it so as not to poison the CATS with all that oil burning or wait till OCI time?

Not bashing RGT as I use it in other vehicles and I am brand agnostic.

I may try supertech, valvoline as I have those in the stash as well to see how those behave. With an 8quart sump though hate to waste good oil.
 
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17,931
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NH
Not sure it will kill the cats, many a Saturn and Corolla soldiered on with high oil consumption and nary a problem. That said... I'd use the M1 and go to 10k OCI's if worried about money, it's an 8 quart sump and unless if he is towing, unlikely to be an issue.
 

Drew7a

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213
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Great Lakes
If it went from "did not use a drop between oil changes" to 1 quart in 1000 miles, either someone is making it up or there is some serious mechanical problem at hand. There really is no other explanation. That's going from "no" oil usage in 5000 miles to using five quarts.
Then back to no oil consumption when using M1. If it were “a serious mechanical problem” do you think the problem would resolve itself by switching brands?
 

Drew7a

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213
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Great Lakes
I've had cars consume a random quart when I change brands, but it always tapers off after that and the next change generally has no consumption. Not something I've ever been able to explain and I've only seen it a time or two.
This is also the first I have seen this behavior and like you have no explanation.
 
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17,241
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Upper Midwest
Then back to no oil consumption when using M1. If it were “a serious mechanical problem” do you think the problem would resolve itself by switching brands?
If not B then A.

Seriously though that is way beyond any "brand change" consumption anyone has ever posted here. I change brands all the time in both my new Tiguan (twice now) and my ancient old cars and I never see anything like this. In fact I'm not sure I've ever seen increased consumption due to a brand change, but maybe that's just me. Other people have, but not going from zero to 1 quart per 1000 miles.
 
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A long time ago I experienced some consumption when I switched brands but it was no where near anything like one quart per 1000 miles. That’s a huge jump. In the car this happened on me I had been using Castrol GTX for many miles and switched to Pennzoil since I had it given to me. As I recall it was something like one quart in 4000 miles.

I switched back to GTX and no consumption.
 
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My experience has shown that some cars like certain oils. My 19' Sorento burned M1 and not PP. My 03' Matrix burns everything, so go figure with that. Find one that doesn't burn and go with that. As long as it's fill synth, you're good. If M1 doesn't burn for you, then use it.
 
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17,241
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Upper Midwest
My experience has shown that some cars like certain oils. My 19' Sorento burned M1 and not PP. My 03' Matrix burns everything, so go figure with that. Find one that doesn't burn and go with that. As long as it's fill synth, you're good. If M1 doesn't burn for you, then use it.
Did your Sorento burn oil at a differential rate of 1 quart per 1000 miles?
 
Had a similar experience with a 2013 Subaru Legacy. Car had the 2.5 FB engine that the internet has blown up as a major oil burner. I never experienced major consumption, but it typically used between 3/4 and 1 quart in a 5K oci. I switched brands between Mobil 1 AFE, PP, and QSUD all in 0W20 flavor. I then did a change with Vavoline SynPower 0W20 (it was on sale) and had no consumption. Next oil change went back to PP and the consumption started again. Made a permanent switch to the Valvoline and never experienced any more oil consumption on the car until we traded it. I can't explain it, but I saw it with my own eyes.
 

Drew7a

Thread starter
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213
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Great Lakes
Opposite happened to me, switched to RGT and my oil consumption stopped.
Agreed, the Honda and Chevy engines are purring along with RGT.

the 5.7L is also noticeably quieter on RGT vs M1. I guess it is back to M1 on the 5.7L or may try Valvoline or Supetech.
 
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17,241
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Upper Midwest
Had a similar experience with a 2013 Subaru Legacy. Car had the 2.5 FB engine that the internet has blown up as a major oil burner. I never experienced major consumption, but it typically used between 3/4 and 1 quart in a 5K oci. I switched brands between Mobil 1 AFE, PP, and QSUD all in 0W20 flavor. I then did a change with Vavoline SynPower 0W20 (it was on sale) and had no consumption. Next oil change went back to PP and the consumption started again. Made a permanent switch to the Valvoline and never experienced any more oil consumption on the car until we traded it. I can't explain it, but I saw it with my own eyes.
Actually though that is not similar. You were seeing perhaps 1 quart in 5000 miles as a differential, the OP is saying 1 quart in 1000 miles. That's a far higher difference between what you saw and what he's posting.
 
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10,695
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Like all mechanical things, there are variations between individual engines of the same type. Add in 0W-water thin oil and even the most minor of imperfections can lead to oil consumption. While the Toyota engines are known to be of very high quality, it would not be surprising to find that a more conventional viscosity solved and/or prevented the problem.

Honda/Acura had and still has a rash of oil consumption issues. Mostly due to the low tension piston rings, failing to seal after far less than 0.001 inches of wear. That's right! A wear number so low, it's measured with 4 significant digits. It's interesting to note that the components removed from those Honda engines often still meet new specifications. Replacement with upgraded parts (read more conventional) solves the problem and the engines go on to live for the typical and expected long lifespan.

What we are seeing are, to some extent, oil related failures. We can successfully use low tension piston rings in bores with tight tolerance control (high quality). But add in wild temperature swings, ultra thin oils, cylinder deactivation, and long oil change intervals and the ability of a thin, low tension ring to seal can be compromised. This should come as no surprise.

In much the same way that it's no surprise that timing chains stretch (wear) much more quickly when engines are operated with thin oils, contaminated with soot and fuel for extended drain intervals.
 
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17,241
Location
Upper Midwest
Like all mechanical things, there are variations between individual engines of the same type. Add in 0W-water thin oil and even the most minor of imperfections can lead to oil consumption. While the Toyota engines are known to be of very high quality, it would not be surprising to find that a more conventional viscosity solved and/or prevented the problem.
The winter rating of the oil doesn't have jack to do with it.
 
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10,695
Location
Jupiter, Florida
The winter rating of the oil doesn't have jack to do with it.
Utterly incorrect. The winter rating of the oil is analogous to the viscosity of the base stock. Sure, PAO's and Esters can achieve a viscosity spread that partially mimics old school conventional multi grade oils. However, I promise the base stock of all 0W oils is very thin, and the VII's do not provide the exact same protection as a higher viscosity oil of a similar rating that is made without VII's. Both pour point depressants and VII's shear with use too. Leading to lower "in use" viscosity. Period, end of story.
 
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