tires are squealing after car repair

Messages
3,872
Location
southern mo
I replaced both front control arms on my saturn. Didn't undo tierod or struts. Now low speed turns the tires squeal. I did get trans fluid on the tires drove through the puddle of it. I also replaced the axle shaft and made a mess and drove over the puddle when I was moving the car after the repair. I drove about 45 miles and they are still doing it. What the heck. I checked my work again and I did it fine car drives straight and feels good just annoying tire noise.....what gives?
 

Nick1994

$50 Site Donor
Messages
13,282
Location
Phoenix, AZ
New control arms have new bushings and ball joints, it may have been aligned with the worn out ones but with new ones they're at a different position. I got an alignment a month ago at Fletchers and it was only $39.99
 
Messages
1,322
Location
Central Oklahoma
I'm no expert but my guess would be it's the surface you are driving on. Here In OK, they love using asphalt. When hot it's very "squishy" and when turning, the tires squeal. Or perhaps the trans fluid is still sticking to the tire's outer tread (which only contacts the road while cornering)? Hopefully someone more experienced will help.
 
Messages
349
Location
Ohio
It won't be to noticeable by eye but with new lower ball joints your tires are going to be pointed more inwards which is called toe in ,,,,,Toe in will create very loud tire squeal at very low speeds,Your going to have to adjust both tie rod ends evenly
 
Messages
231
Location
Tucson, AZ
This ^. I had my Mustang do this once. Squealed and darted back and forth on the road. My dad and I had done a tie rod adjustment to adjust the toe-in, and hadn't tightened the sleeve bolts enough. They had loosened up just a little, causing toe-out and the symptoms and noise I described. Now my dad was a heck of a mechanic and wouldn't believe it until I showed him. There was at least 1/4" static toe-out, and who knows how much dynamic toe-out with the sleeves loose. We readjusted it & really tightened them down & no more issues. We used to adjust the camber by putting a large magnet that had a flat back edge, parallel to the front, on the disc rotor. Put a bubble level on the back side, and adjusted the eccentric cams that car used until it was good. Was able to measure the castor satisfactorily that way, too, by knowing how the camber changed as the tire moved from full in to full out. Learned to adjust caster, then camber, then toe last, as the previous item affected the others. We did as good as any shop would have. Great times working on that '67 Mustang fastback with my dad. Modified the front end geometry to match the Shelby's. Good stuff. Gary
 
Messages
4,497
Location
Massachusetts
Originally Posted By: Oil Changer
I was taught that it is always best to get an alignment after any suspension R&R.
thumbsup That's what I recommend to my customers but unfortunately most want the cheapest way out.
 

ram_man

Thread starter
Messages
3,872
Location
southern mo
The steering wheel is exactly where it was before hand. The alignment didn't change. Would getting trans fluid on the tires cause it?
 
Messages
22,446
Location
Apple Valley, California
Originally Posted By: Zaedock
Originally Posted By: Oil Changer
I was taught that it is always best to get an alignment after any suspension R&R.
thumbsup That's what I recommend to my customers but unfortunately most want the cheapest way out.
x2
 
Messages
5,651
Location
Iowa
Originally Posted By: ram_man
The steering wheel is exactly where it was before hand. The alignment didn't change. Would getting trans fluid on the tires cause it?
Just because the wheel didn't change, doesn't mean the alignment didn't change. Get it checked- I bet they'll find it's off.
 
Messages
394
Location
San Diego, California
Originally Posted By: The_Eric
Originally Posted By: ram_man
The steering wheel is exactly where it was before hand. The alignment didn't change. Would getting trans fluid on the tires cause it?
Just because the wheel didn't change, doesn't mean the alignment didn't change. Get it checked- I bet they'll find it's off.
This. The bushings in the new arms are not yet compressed from years of the car's weight sitting on them. The alignment has changed, even if slight. Toe-out usually causes this in my experience.
 
Messages
40,710
Location
Great Lakes
Originally Posted By: ram_man
The steering wheel is exactly where it was before hand. The alignment didn't change.
LOL There is a lot more to an alignment than just steering wheel position. How would you know that your car has proper camber, caster, and toe by looking at the steering wheel?
 
Messages
229
Location
Ballwin, MO
I remember my mechanics always telling me that if you replaced any suspension component (other than possibly a shock absorber) that an alignment would be needed. I agree with the other posters that the squealing sound indicates the need for an alignment. I don't think the trans fluid on the tires has anything to do with this. I also agree that just because the steering wheel position didn't change that that DOES NOT MEAN that the alignment itself did not change. For example, if you had excessive toe-in or toe-out that was an equal amount incorrect on both sides, I think your steering wheel would still be straight but your alignment itself would be way out.
 
Messages
3,492
Location
NJ, USA
Originally Posted By: Jasper8146
I remember my mechanics always telling me that if you replaced any suspension component (other than possibly a shock absorber) that an alignment would be needed.
Please add to your list of alignment-not-required parts: swaybar links/bushings and (sometimes) pressed-in ball joints. Replacement of control arms as ram_man has done definitely requires an alignment.
 
Messages
2,871
Location
High Tax Illinois
Anytime you replace anything mechanical on the front suspension/steering you have to re-align it. There's too much difference in parts for you not to. Shocks or sway bar bushings would be the only thing not needing a re-alignment, as they are a different maintenance item not directly connected to steering or the suspension. Steering wheel position has nothing to do front end alignment being correct or wrong. It is a good indicator if car comes back with mud on left or right front tires and its not straight anymore, as perhaps children/wife/girlfriend put in the ditch.
 
Originally Posted By: ram_man
The steering wheel is exactly where it was before hand. The alignment didn't change. Would getting trans fluid on the tires cause it?
It's statements like this that indicate that you aren't fully aware of what all is involved in alignment..... Get an alignment and the noise will be gone and your tires will wear longer too.
 
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