Tire repair $$$$$$

Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
13,573
Location
Suburban Washington DC
Labor rates are around $120/hr. Service writer creates a work order, tech finds the car in the lot and drives it into the shop. Lifts the car, pulls the wheel, dunks the tire in the water tank to find the leak, dismounts the tire, patches it, remounts it, dunks it in the water tank again to check for leaks, balances the tire, puts it back on the car, pulls the car back out, service writer finalizes the invoice, cashier rings you up. For $39 that all would have to have taken place in under 20 minutes. Kinda doubt it. Patching tires isn't a profitable service.
 

CKN

Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
9,670
Location
Utah
I had a slow leak in one of my tires . I got tired of putting air in it twice a week so this morning I went to a local shop had it repaired . They found a small screw in it , and patched the tire . Total out the door price was $39.00 !! I know everything is going up but the last tire repair was around $25 less than a year ago . If I had seen the screw I would have removed it and plugged it myself . Oh well . it's done ..
It's a patch...not a plug. It's much better. As stated-Labor rates are any where from $80.00/hr to $160.00 (local Ford dealer). The price was fair.
 

AZjeff

$50 Site Donor 2023
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
7,361
Location
in Az where the Deer and Antelope play
Not everyone has a Discount Tire in town even though it seems like it to some of us. Free tire repair is great but I've had less than great service at 2 different DT locations on my last visits.

1669758896399.jpg
 

nomas

Thread starter
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
1,300
Location
Louisiana
It's a patch... not a plug. It's much better. As stated-Labor rates are any where from $80.00/hr to $160.00 (local Ford dealer). The price was fair.
I know it's a patch . I said that I would have plugged it .
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2003
Messages
38,614
Location
ME
A haircut's $20 now, and IMO there's more expertise and liability in properly patching a tire so $39 isn't unreasonable.

Getting the attention of a living, breathing person on exclusively your problem for 20-30 minutes is easily worth that.
 
Joined
Mar 8, 2012
Messages
1,934
Location
MO
FIL just paid $60 in Naples, FL after picking up a nail from all the storm damage/cleanup. The tire shop had something like 50+ to do that day, no new tire sales, just plugging and patching.
 

AutoMechanic

Site Donor 2023
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
9,691
Location
Roanoke Virginia
I definitely wouldn’t pay to have it done but I can understand why you did. We charge $19.95 at my dealership for flat repairs. I usually give them to the techs who like doing tires cause it certainly ain’t me lol.
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2017
Messages
3,319
Location
near Cincinnati, OH
It depends on whether they are trying to make a buck off everyone or trying to create a positive customer experience to get repeat business.

They may have only one chance to make a good impression. Would I go back (for any kind of work, not just a patch) to a shop that charged $39? Not unless there were no other options within a reasonable distance.
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
1,967
Location
US
Was actually just in a local chain(Dobbs Tire and Auto) last night as a tire on my wife's Compass had gone down 10 psi after I put air in it the night before.

I pulled it off, found and marked a nail in the tread-close enough to the edge I was afraid they MIGHT consider it out of the repairable area-and decided I didn't really feel comfortable plugging it so off I went to try and get it patched.

Fortunately they were able to do it last night, and because her tires came from there they didn't charge. I was looking at their posted prices, though, and they said $30 for tires under 19" and $40 for 19" and larger.

Tires are one of those areas I've never really ventured in my own auto repair other than an occasional plug, and I'm reluctant to even do those now given what I've read/heard about how even a properly done one can damage the tire long-term.

In any case, to be honest with labor rates as they are now, $30 for a technician to dismount, inspect, plug, and remount a tire doesn't sound terrible to me. Many places will hit you for that much or more to dismount and remount a different tire.

Again, too, I've never fitted a patch but the videos I've seen of it look a decent bit more involved than plugging even once the tire is off the wheel.
 

nomas

Thread starter
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
1,300
Location
Louisiana
Whether it's reasonable for the amount of work done was never the issue . I paid a little under $25 less than a year ago at a different shop in this same town . Yesterday I paid $39.00 for the same work . This is a new location for an existing business in another area . I've noticed that their prices are higher on everything compared to the other shops locally . There is plenty of competition around here for tires and service work . They have name recognition though . I like to spread my business around since none of these guys are national franchise type operations . I'm afraid this shop is pricing itself out of future consideration from me though .
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2010
Messages
8,044
Location
Connecticut
Many of the smaller tire shops in my area are increasing their rates for this stuff because it has become their main business. My local mom and pop tire shop doesn't really sell many tires now, but they sure do mount/balance a lot of tires that people purchase online, myself included.
 
Joined
Aug 5, 2021
Messages
171
Location
on the road in NE Oklahoma
This topic reminds me of a tire plugging experience I has about 50 years ago. Nothing tragic or dangerous, just a few minutes of brushing up next to fellow human being that I still regard as a true artist in his chosen field.

I’m the early ‘70’s I was driving my Triumph Spitfire across southern Oklahoma, going from Norman to Fort Sill to visit a pal who was stationed there.

The car was about 5 years old, but still dead-on reliable. I had just driven it cross-country in a huge loop, going from Oklahoma to Seattle, down the coast to San Diego, then back to Oklahoma. All that distance in a tiny car with a great gal as my companion in adventure. Only one mishap was when I hit a pot hole and damaged the front left wheel bearing. It was a great little car.

Back to the tire plugging. When I noticed the flat front tire I pulled over to a very conveniently situated gas station.

The mechanic who was working there told me to hang on while he got his tools.

He located the leak (from a nail) with a cup of water he had tossed on the tire, and then had me back up slightly so the tire was oriented to his satisfaction. He laid out his tools on a shop towel next to the tire. In a manner like a surgeon would be doing, all the while chewing on a dead cigar.

His only remark to me was, “…how much air….” I told him 30 psi, then he did what to me seemed like magic or a well choreographed ballet.

Right there by the gas pumps he aired up tire, with one hand on the sidewall, so as to gauge how much air it was holding. After he was satisfied with the tire pressure, and with all the graceful moves of a dancer, he pulled out the nail and put in the prepared plug in one smooth motion. It happened so fast I didn’t even hear any air escaping. The guy was an artist, plain and simple. I’m sure I hadn’t been in the gas station more than 3 minutes total.

He charged me $0.50.

Z
 
Top