Tips for sealing radiator hose

Messages
20
Location
Atlanta
I have an Acura TL with 200k miles. I replaced the thermostat as preventative maintenance as part of a timing belt job. This required me to undo the lower radiator hose from the nipple (which was a bear to get off). I had trouble reinstalling the OEM spring clamp, so I replaced with a worm drive hose clamp, and it presented with a slow drip leak. I then replaced with the original spring clamp, and now that too is still producing a drip leak. The spring clamp was locked open on my work bench for 3-4 days, so perhaps it lost some tension? The hose itself looks OK. I'm really trying to avoid having to do anything that requires me to replace too much brand new OEM coolant. My current plan is to remove the hose from the nipple (which will involve *some* coolant loss), wipe down the surfaces, brush on some Permatex #3, let it set up, and then install a new OEM hose clamp. Any other feedback or advice?
 
Messages
1,456
Location
Perris, CA
Was there any corrosion or build-up on the nipple when you reattached the hose? That's the only reason I've had one leak, and sanding it off fixed the problem.
 
Messages
7,430
Location
beaver land EH?
when touching cooling components given such high mileage, you must consider replacing the otherwise slightly swollen lower and/or upper rad hoses as preventative maintenance. Once replaced, you can use factory spring clamp or worm drive clamps (choice is all yours). Q.
 
Messages
23,043
Location
CA
Originally Posted by Parlay_Slow
Is there any possible way to replace the hose without losing most of the coolant?
No, but you can drain the coolant into a new, clean container.
 
Messages
279
Location
Upstate NY
Originally Posted by Ursatdx
It might be prudent to replace the hose as well. 200k.
THIS^^^. It's not the clamps. It's the hose that lost elasticity over 200K miles of driving. Replace with new OEM hoses.
 
Messages
4,064
Location
Central Virginia
I would agree w/new hose, but the lower hose is the cold hose and the upper is the hot side. The lower hose will last longer. That being said, I never worry about antifreeze. Just consider it a flush. I reuse the spring clamps as long as they are reasonable to reach.
 
Messages
4,398
Location
Connecticut
I always used red Loctite sealant (516 or 518) and it always sealed up any drips whether on new or old hoses....and I always used the orig factory spring clamps.
 
Messages
3,275
Location
On another site
Originally Posted by windeye
Originally Posted by Ursatdx
It might be prudent to replace the hose as well. 200k.
THIS^^^. It's not the clamps. It's the hose that lost elasticity over 200K miles of driving. Replace with new OEM hoses.
Yup; had more than one older hose fail to seal due to hardness and aging.
 
Messages
1,923
Location
Cincinnati, USA
Originally Posted by The Critic
Originally Posted by Parlay_Slow
Is there any possible way to replace the hose without losing most of the coolant?
No, but you can drain the coolant into a new, clean container.
and strain it with an old t-shirt if there's any debris in it.
 
Messages
301
Location
Central Texas
Has the hose ever been replaced? If so, How many miles and how much time ago? If the hose is not very old check to see that the screw type clamp did not distort the nipple. You may have distorted the nipple when you took the hose off.
 
Messages
9,028
Location
Marshfield , MA
I'd have to see the hose before I condemned it. I goop all the hoses I have off with Permatex Aviation Forma-gasket . Non-hardening and slippery as well as a sealer . Great for eroded aluminum. grin2
 
Messages
325
Location
Colorado
Originally Posted by Anduril
Was there any corrosion or build-up on the nipple when you reattached the hose? That's the only reason I've had one leak, and sanding it off fixed the problem.
+1 I was surprised at how much build-up I had when I changed both hoses on my 95 Maxima. Some 3M aluminum oxide sandpaper wrapped around the nipple and used in a "shoe-shine" fashion quickly cleaned it up. (Stuff a paper towel in the nipple to avoid getting debris inside.) Putting on new hoses also seems prudent and consider any lost coolant if you don't collect it, another good flush if you did just a drain/refill which only gets a portion of the coolant out of the block.
 
Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Originally Posted by andyd
I'd have to see the hose before I condemned it. I goop all the hoses I have off with Permatex Aviation Forma-gasket . Non-hardening and slippery as well as a sealer . Great for eroded aluminum. grin2
Good idea, I have also used Rectorseal sealants, sometimes T Plus 2.
 
Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Maybe nothing wrong with the hose, use a sealer on it. I just worked on my 206,000 mile Trooper with 3.2L engine, replaced intake gaskets and when I looked at the many hoses around that manifold, I examined them carefully, and nothing was wrong with them. But with the original spring clamps they leaked. I used rectorseal and Norma hose clamps from Amazon, best clamps ever, and now no leaks. To verify tightness, rent from AutoZone the radiator pressure tool, make up a soap solution, and check for air bubbles on all connections. See on my engine, you cant get to many connections without taking off the upper intake manifold.
 
Messages
5,812
Location
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Originally Posted by andyd
I'd have to see the hose before I condemned it. I goop all the hoses I have off with Permatex Aviation Forma-gasket . Non-hardening and slippery as well as a sealer . Great for eroded aluminum. grin2
How do we know that it's not plastic?
 
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